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Archive for the ‘virtual reality’ category: Page 5

Jan 18, 2020

Not sure how old this video is

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, information science, robotics/AI, virtual reality

Not sure how old this video is. But, Very impressive if it is able to grab random objects at these speeds; although i suspect it needed a lot of training before.


This handy #roboticarm can be trained to catch practically anything. 🤖 💪

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Jan 16, 2020

360 Video: Go on a Mission With Zipline’s Delivery Drones

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, drones, mobile phones, virtual reality

With 360 video, IEEE Spectrum takes you behind the scenes with one of the world’s first drone-delivery companies. Zipline, based in California, is using drones to deliver blood to hospitals throughout Rwanda. At an operations center in Muhanga, you’ll watch as Zipline technicians assemble the modular drones, fill their cargo holds, and launch them via catapult. You’ll see a package float down from the sky above a rural hospital, and you’ll get a closeup look at Zipline’s ingenious method for capturing returning drones.

You can follow the action in a 360-degree video in three ways: 1) Watch on your computer, using your mouse to click and drag on the video; 2) watch on your phone, moving the phone around to change your view; or 3) watch on a VR headset for the full immersive experience.

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Jan 10, 2020

The ‘virtual’ future of Holocaust education is already here

Posted by in categories: education, virtual reality

From recreating the Nuremberg Trials to a virtual reality ‘walk-through’ of Auschwitz-Birkenau, new gaming technology is replacing face-to-face encounters with Holocaust survivors.

Dec 13, 2019

Asia’s roll-out of 5G will bring benefits across the new economy

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, biotech/medical, economics, internet, robotics/AI, virtual reality

While these “moonshots” are still some years away, there are viable applications of 5G in the near term. South Korea launched the world’s first commercial 5G network in April and has seen data transfer rates rise from 50 megabits per second to over 700 Mbps. This enables the delivery of augmented reality, virtual reality and AI-enhanced real-time sports content.


With the arrival of next-generation mobile networks, new services like remote surgery will be suddenly feasible. More immediately, expect a boom in video traffic and augmented reality content.

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Dec 6, 2019

Scientists Are Contemplating a 1,000-Year Space Mission to Save Humanity

Posted by in categories: climatology, Elon Musk, space, sustainability, virtual reality

VR and Interstellar Travel

Crew members in route to a distant planet may best be accommodated by full immersion VR. The actual spaceship could be reduced to a relatively simple, small, well-shielded vehicle. Inside the crew’s biological material could be supported by a simplified nutrition, waste and maintenance system. Their minds could inhabit a fully immersive VR environment that would provide them with all the luxuries of vast, diverse spaces and experiences — complete with simulated gravity, simulated pleasant nature-like and artificial environments, and simulated meals.

They could also engage in simulating the type of society they intend to build once they arrive in their new physical environment, using similar constraints to the ones they will encounter. This could allow many years for actual human experiences to test and refine what they will build and how they will interact in their new home.

Continue reading “Scientists Are Contemplating a 1,000-Year Space Mission to Save Humanity” »

Dec 5, 2019

Developer Economics Survey | Developer tools, apps, design, games

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, economics, virtual reality

Take the Developer Economics Survey and win prizes!


The Developer Economics survey is run by independent analyst firm /Data, reaching over 40,000+ developers in 167 countries annually. It is for Software developers: professionals, hobbyists & students, working across all major areas: mobile, web, desktop, cloud, IoT, AR/VR, games, ML & data science.

Nov 26, 2019

Cows on Russian Farm Get Fitted with VR Goggles to Increase Milk Production

Posted by in categories: food, sustainability, virtual reality

On a farm near Moscow, the cows are walking around with VR goggles strapped to their heads in an effort to improve their living conditions, relax them, with the ultimate goal for them to produce more milk.

Nov 14, 2019

From sci-fi to science lab: Holograms you can ‘feel’

Posted by in categories: holograms, science, virtual reality

Walking, talking holograms have been a staple of sci-fi films since Princess Leia was magically brought to life in “Star Wars”.

Now scientists in Britain say they can make even more realistic 3D versions—a butterfly, a globe, an emoji—which can be seen with the , heard and even felt without the need for any .

Writing in the journal Nature, a team at the University of Sussex in southern England, said technology currently in use can create 3D images but they are slow, short-lived and “most importantly, rely on operating principles that cannot produce tactile and auditive content as well”.

Nov 12, 2019

Specific neurons that map memories now identified in the human brain

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, engineering, neuroscience, virtual reality

An important aspect of human memory is our ability to conjure specific moments from the vast array of experiences that have occurred in any given setting. For example, if asked to recommend a tourist itinerary for a city you have visited many times, your brain somehow enables you to selectively recall and distinguish specific memories from your different trips to provide an answer.

Studies have shown that —the kind of you can consciously recall like your home address or your mother’s name—relies on healthy medial temporal lobe structures in the , including the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex (EC). These regions are also important for spatial cognition, demonstrated by the Nobel-Prize-winning discovery of “place cells” and “grid cells” in these regions— that activate to represent specific locations in the environment during navigation (akin to a GPS). However, it has not been clear if or how this “spatial map” in the brain relates to a person’s memory of events at those locations, and how in these regions enables us to target a particular memory for retrieval among related experiences.

A team led by neuroengineers at Columbia Engineering has found the first evidence that in the human brain target specific memories during recall. They studied recordings in neurosurgical patients who had electrodes implanted in their brains and examined how the patients’ brain signals corresponded to their behavior while performing a virtual-reality (VR) object-location memory task. The researchers identified “memory-trace cells” whose activity was spatially tuned to the location where subjects remembered encountering specific objects. The study is published today in Nature Neuroscience.

Nov 11, 2019

New photonic liquid crystals could lead to next-generation displays

Posted by in categories: electronics, virtual reality

A new technique to change the structure of liquid crystals could lead to the development of fast-responding liquid crystals suitable for next generation displays—3D, augmented and virtual reality—and advanced photonic applications such as mirrorless lasers, bio-sensors and fast/slow light generation, according to an international team of researchers from Penn State, the Air Force Research Laboratory and the National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan.

“The liquid crystals we are working with are called blue-phase liquid crystals,” said Iam Choon Khoo, the William E. Leonhard Professor of Electrical Engineering, who is the corresponding author for this article. “The most important thing about this research is the fundamental understanding of what happens when you apply a field, which has led to the development of Repetitively-Applied Field technique. We believe that this method is almost a universal template that can be used for reconfiguring many similar types of liquid crystals and soft matter.”

Blue-phase liquid crystals typically self-assemble into a cubic photonic-crystal . The researchers believed that by creating other structures they could develop properties not present in the current form. After nearly two years of experimentation, they realized that by applying an intermittent electrical field and allowing the system to relax between applications and to dissipate accumulated heat, they could slowly coax the crystals into stable and field-free orthorhombic and tetragonal structures.

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