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Archive for the ‘supercomputing’ category

Feb 19, 2018

Supercomputer on a fingernail, artificial synapse ushers in new AI revolution

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, supercomputing

WHY THIS MATTERS IN BRIEF

There is nothing on Earth like the human brain, even today’s AI doesn’t come close, but now researchers have created an Artificial Synapse that’s 200 million times faster than a human synapse, and one day it will revolutionise AI and computing.

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Feb 12, 2018

How the United States Plans to Reclaim Its Supercomputer Dominance

Posted by in categories: neuroscience, supercomputing

It’s a tight race between the U.S. and China for who will build the next supercomputer, set to be as powerful as the human brain.

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Feb 11, 2018

Particle interactions on Titan support the search for new physics discoveries

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, particle physics, supercomputing

Nuclear physicists are using the nation’s most powerful supercomputer, Titan, at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility to study particle interactions important to energy production in the sun and stars and to propel the search for new physics discoveries.

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Oct 29, 2017

The New Religions Obsessed with A.I

Posted by in categories: employment, Ray Kurzweil, robotics/AI, singularity, supercomputing

How far should we integrate human physiology with technology? What do we do with self-aware androids—like Blade Runner’s replicants—and self-aware supercomputers? Or the merging of our brains with them? If Ray Kurzweil’s famous singularity—a future in which the exponential growth of technology turns into a runaway train—becomes a reality, does religion have something to offer in response?


Yes, not only is A.I. potentially taking all of our jobs, but it’s also changing religion.

Brandon WithrowBrandon Withrow

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Oct 19, 2017

How Chinese scientists used a supercomputer to solve the ancient puzzle called the Three Body Problem

Posted by in categories: climatology, space, supercomputing

“Scientists and philosophers… had always assumed that the world worked by physical laws, and if you could measure initial conditions accurately enough, those laws would let you predict the future indefinitely. As James Gleick described it in his book Chaos: Making a New Science, this view was very wrong.”

“There was always one small compromise, so small that working scientists usually forgot it was there, lurking in a corner of their philosophies like an unpaid bill. Measurements could never be perfect,” he wrote. “Scientists marching under Newton’s banner actually waved another flag that said something like this: Given an approximate knowledge of a system’s initial conditions and an understanding of natural law, one can calculate the approximate behaviour of the system. This assumption lay at the philosophical heart of science.”

“Today we know how wrong this assumption was. The Three Body Problem is now recognized as a classic example of a chaotic system. Like the butterfly that causes a hurricane by flapping its wings, it is exquisitely sensitive to initial conditions. The tiniest tweak can have massive consequences down the line.”

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Oct 18, 2017

Eighteen Zeros

Posted by in category: supercomputing

SPONSOR CONTENT: The U.S. Department of Energy tasked six major computing companies with researching and developing an exascale supercomputer.

With the ability to run a quintillion calculations per second—that’s a one with eighteen zeros after it—the implications of an exascale computer would touch nearly every facet of our lives, and would provide the opportunity to potentially solve humanity’s most pressing problems. http://theatln.tc/2xc7QLn

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Oct 15, 2017

How scientists and supercomputers could make oceans drinkable

Posted by in categories: nanotechnology, particle physics, supercomputing, sustainability

Aleksandr Noy has big plans for a very small tool. A senior research scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Noy has devoted a significant part of his career to perfecting the liquid alchemy known as desalination—removing salt from seawater. His stock-in-trade is the carbon nanotube. In 2006, Noy had the audacity to embrace a radical theory: Maybe nanotubes—cylinders so tiny, they can be seen only with an electron microscope—could act as desalination filters. It depended on just how wide the tubes were. The opening needed to be big enough to let water molecules flow through but small enough to block the larger salt particles that make seawater undrinkable. Put enough carbon nanotubes together and you potentially have the world’s most efficient machine for making clean water.

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Oct 1, 2017

Microsoft’s new coding language is made for quantum computers

Posted by in categories: quantum physics, supercomputing

When one of the first personal computers, the Altair 8800 came along in 1976, Microsoft was ready with a programming language, Altair BASIC. It wants to be equally prepared when quantum computers go mainstream, so it has unveiled a new programming language and other tools for the futuristic tech at its Ignite conference. You’ll still need to understand Qubits and other weird concepts, but by integrating traditional languages like C# and Python, Microsoft will make it easier to do mainstream computing on the complex machines.

Quantum computing is famously difficult to grasp — even IBM’s “Beginner’s Guide” is laughingly opaque. In discussing Microsoft’s new initiatives, Bill Gates called the physics “hieroglyphics,” and when asked if he could describe it in one sentence, Satya Nadella said “I don’t think so. I wish I could.”

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Sep 25, 2017

New type of supercomputer could be based on ‘magic dust’ combination of light and matter

Posted by in category: supercomputing

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Sep 20, 2017

China Upgrading Milky Way 2 Supercomputer to 95 Petaflops

Posted by in category: supercomputing

We have some breaking news from the IHPC Forum in Guangzhou today. Researchers in China are busy upgrading the MilkyWay 2 (Tianhe-2) system to nearly 95 Petaflops (peak). This should nearly double the performance of the system, which is currently ranked at #2 on TOP500 with 33.86 Petaflops on the Linpack benchmark. The upgraded system, dubbed Tianhe −2A, should be completed in the coming months.

Details about the system upgrade were presented at the conference opening session. While the current system derives much of its performance from Intel Knights Corner co-processors, the new system swaps these PCI devices out for custom-made 4-way MATRIX-200o boards, with each chip providing 2.46 Teraflops of peak performance.

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