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Archive for the ‘computing’ category

Jun 24, 2017

Intel Launches Core i9 X-Series CPUs, 10-Core Available Now and 18 in October

Posted by in category: computing

Intel’s new Core i9 CPU family and its X-Series of processors are both available for preorder today, with shipments expected on June 26.

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Jun 23, 2017

Magnetic nanoknots evoke Lord Kelvin’s vortex theory of atoms

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, mathematics, nanotechnology

(Phys.org)—In the late 1800s when scientists were still trying to figure out what exactly atoms are, one of the leading theories, proposed by Lord Kelvin, was that atoms are knots of swirling vortices in the aether. Although this idea turned out to be completely wrong, it ushered in modern knot theory, which today is used in various areas of science such as fluid dynamics, the structure of DNA, and the concept of chirality.

Now in a new paper published in Physical Review Letters, mathematical physicist Paul Sutcliffe at Durham University in the UK has theoretically shown that nanoparticles called magnetic skyrmions can be tied into various types of knots with different magnetic properties. He explains that, in a sense, these nanoknots represent a “nanoscale resurrection of Kelvin’s dream of knotted fields.”

Skyrmions are the name of a general class of particles that are made by twisting a field. When this field is a magnetic field, the skyrmions are called magnetic skyrmions. Magnetic skyrmions have attracted a lot of attention recently due to their potential applications in spintronics, where electron spins (which are related to the electron’s magnetic properties) are exploited in the design of transistors, storage media, and related devices.

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Jun 19, 2017

Why Interstellar Travel Will Be Possible Sooner Than You Think

Posted by in categories: computing, physics, space travel

The term “moonshot” is sometimes invoked to denote a project so outrageously ambitious that it can only be described by comparing it to the Apollo 11 mission to land the first human on the Moon. The Breakthrough Starshot Initiative transcends the moonshot descriptor because its purpose goes far beyond the Moon. The aptly-named project seeks to travel to the nearest stars.

The brainchild of Russian-born tech entrepreneur billionaire Yuri Milner, Breakthrough Starshot was announced in April 2016 at a press conference joined by renowned physicists including Stephen Hawking and Freeman Dyson. While still early, the current vision is that thousands of wafer-sized chips attached to large, silver lightsails will be placed into Earth orbit and accelerated by the pressure of an intense Earth-based laser hitting the lightsail.

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Jun 15, 2017

What is a Drone? (Future A to Z)

Posted by in categories: automation, computing, drones, electronics, military, nuclear weapons, robotics/AI

Drones. Drone is a word you see pretty often in today’s pop culture. But drones seem to be an extremely diverse species. Even flightless vehicles are occasionally referred to as drones. So what exactly is a drone?

In this video series, the Galactic Public Archives takes bite-sized looks at a variety of terms, technologies, and ideas that are likely to be prominent in the future. Terms are regularly changing and being redefined with the passing of time. With constant breakthroughs and the development of new technology and other resources, we seek to define what these things are and how they will impact our future.

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Jun 15, 2017

The New Gnosticism of the Transhumanists

Posted by in categories: computing, cyborgs, geopolitics, life extension, neuroscience, singularity, transhumanism

New story about the recent book on #transhumanism To Be a Machine:


For the (very very quickly) upcoming Love & Death Issue, I had the chance to interview the journalist, Mark O’Connell, who is the author most recently of To Be A Machine: Adventures Among Cyborgs, Utopians, Hackers, and the Futurists Solving the Modest Problem of Death. He also wrote that amazing piece in the New York Times Magazine a few months ago about Zoltan Istvan, the transhumanist who ran for president and drove across the country in a coffin-shaped bus. O’Connell’s new book reads like a travelogue among characters like Zoltan, futuristic types (mostly from California) that O’Connell describes with a charming blend of cynicism and aloof interest. Like an agnostic amidst a group of “true believers,” O’Connell is both repelled by and drawn in by the belief system that transhumanism proffers.

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Jun 14, 2017

Organ chips get smart and go electric

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, engineering, health, neuroscience

Organs-on-Chips (Organ Chips) are emerging as powerful tools that allow researchers to study the physiology of human organs and tissues in ways not possible before. By mimicking normal blood flow, the mechanical microenvironment, and how different tissues physically interface with one another in living organs, they offer a more systematic approach to testing drugs than other in vitro methods that ultimately could help to replace animal testing.

As it can take weeks to grow human cells into intact differentiated and functional tissues within Organ Chips, such as those that mimic the lung and intestine, and researchers seek to understand how drugs, toxins or other perturbations alter tissue structure and function, the team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering led by Donald Ingber has been searching for ways to non-invasively monitor the health and maturity of cells cultured within these microfluidic devices over extended times.

It has been particularly difficult to measure changes in electrical functions of cells grown within Organ Chips that are normally electrically active, such as neuronal cells in the brain or beating heart cells, both during their differentiation and in response to drugs.

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Jun 13, 2017

When a Computer Program Keeps You in Jail

Posted by in category: computing

Intellectual property claims keep relevant evidence out of court.

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Jun 10, 2017

Quantum Computers and Parallel Universes

Posted by in categories: computing, cosmology, quantum physics

We have a highly respected Theoretical Physicist and a pioneer of Quantum Computing, along with the Founder of one of the leading quantum computer companies, D-Wave (whose clients include Google and NASA), talking about parallel universes. Here is a key that I discovered. They are not talking about parallel universes as a theory but as something factual that exists.


An amazing article on the ability of a Quantum Computer to exploit parallel universes. This article is a MUST READ!

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Jun 8, 2017

Artificial General Intelligence (AGI): Future A to Z

Posted by in categories: business, computing, cyborgs, engineering, ethics, existential risks, machine learning, robotics/AI, singularity

What is the ultimate goal of Artificial General Intelligence?

In this video series, the Galactic Public Archives takes bite-sized looks at a variety of terms, technologies, and ideas that are likely to be prominent in the future. Terms are regularly changing and being redefined with the passing of time. With constant breakthroughs and the development of new technology and other resources, we seek to define what these things are and how they will impact our future.

Continue reading “Artificial General Intelligence (AGI): Future A to Z” »

Jun 8, 2017

A Hardware Update for the Human Brain

Posted by in categories: computing, neuroscience

From Silicon Valley startups to the U.S. Department of Defense, scientists and engineers are hard at work on a brain-computer interface that could turn us into programmable, debuggable machines.

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