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Archive for the ‘cyborgs’ category

Nov 21, 2017

Why cyborg creators must self-govern security, privacy efforts

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, cyborgs, geopolitics, robotics/AI, transhumanism

Most people probably aren’t aware of this, but the 2016 U.S. Presidential election included a candidate who had a radio-frequency identification chip implanted in his hand. No, it wasn’t Donald J. Trump. It was Zoltan Istvan, a nominee representing the Silicon Valley-based Transhumanist Party and his body-worn chip unlocked his front door, provided computer password access and sent an auto-text that said: “Win in 2016!”

The transhumanist movement – employing technology and radical science to modify humans – offers a glimpse into the marriage of machines and people, the focus of a recent paper released by the Institute for Critical Infrastructure Technology (ICIT). With cybernetic implants already available to consumers, the prospect for techno-human transmutation – cyborgs – is not as far away as many may think.

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Nov 17, 2017

Bioengineered robotic hand with its own nervous system will sense touch

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, cyborgs, health, robotics/AI

The sense of touch is often taken for granted. For someone without a limb or hand, losing that sense of touch can be devastating. While highly sophisticated prostheses with complex moving fingers and joints are available to mimic almost every hand motion, they remain frustratingly difficult and unnatural for the user. This is largely because they lack the tactile experience that guides every movement. This void in sensation results in limited use or abandonment of these very expensive artificial devices. So why not make a prosthesis that can actually “feel” its environment?

That is exactly what an interdisciplinary team of scientists from Florida Atlantic University and the University of Utah School of Medicine aims to do. They are developing a first-of-its-kind bioengineered robotic hand that will grow and adapt to its environment. This “living” robot will have its own peripheral nervous system directly linking robotic sensors and actuators. FAU’s College of Engineering and Computer Science is leading the multidisciplinary team that has received a four-year, $1.3 million grant from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the National Institutes of Health for a project titled “Virtual Neuroprosthesis: Restoring Autonomy to People Suffering from Neurotrauma.”

robotic hand

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Nov 15, 2017

A New Futuristic Robot Lets Your Arms Lift Half a Ton

Posted by in categories: biological, climatology, cyborgs, Elon Musk, robotics/AI, space travel, sustainability

Have you ever lifted half a ton? With the Guardian GT, a set of robotic arms, you could do so with as little as two kilogram (five pounds) of force, allowing you to have superhuman strength.

Elon Musk recently made headlines asserting that, in order for us to both progress and survive as a species, we must merge with machines and become cyborgs. And, as climate change rages onwards and the biological difficulties of completing a human mission to Mars become ever more apparent, many are beginning to agree.

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Nov 15, 2017

The First Human-Pig Hybrid Has Been Successfully Created In A Lab

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cyborgs

Not sure what to think of this, opinions thoughts??


Written By Amanda Froelich Truth Theory

In a move that can only be considered controversial, the first pig-human hybrid has been successfully created in a lab. Researchers managed to grow human cells inside early-stage pig embryos, which led to the creation of the first pig-human hybrids ever made. The result is described as interspecies chimeras.

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Nov 15, 2017

For The First Time Ever Scientists Have Boosted Human Memory With a Brain Implant

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cyborgs, Elon Musk, engineering, neuroscience

With everyone from Elon Musk to MIT to the US Department of Defense researching brain implants, it seems only a matter of time before such devices are ready to help humans extend their natural capabilities.

Now, a professor from the University of Southern California (USC) has demonstrated the use of a brain implant to improve the human memory, and the device could have major implications for the treatment of one of the US’s deadliest diseases.

Dong Song is a research associate professor of biomedical engineering at USC, and he recently presented his findings on a “memory prosthesis” during a meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in Washington D.C. According to a New Scientist report, the device is the first to effectively improve the human memory.

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Nov 4, 2017

Cyborgs Among Us

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cyborgs, evolution, transhumanism

This film “Cyborgs Among Us” that has a segment on my #transhumanism work (as well as many others in our community) has its #Dutch premier on Nov 10 in a major international science film festival. Go see it if you can!


Imagine having a sixth sense! These are the first cyborgs that transcend the boundaries of human possibility and spark the debate about the technological evolution of mankind. Cyborgs Among Us offers insight into how technology can become part of us and the social and ethical implications associated with it.

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Oct 29, 2017

Bionic Contacts: Goodbye Glasses. Hello Vision That’s 3x Better Than 20/20

Posted by in categories: cyborgs, transhumanism

The Ocumetics Bionic Lens essentially replaces a person’s natural eye lens, given them the ability to see three times better than 20/20 vision. Though not yet available to the public, human trials are expected to begin on the lenses in July 2017.

Most of us take our vision for granted. As a result, we take the ability to read, write, drive, and complete a multitude of other tasks for granted. However, unfortunately, sight is not so easy for everyone.

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Oct 29, 2017

This artificial muscle is 3 times stronger than natural muscle

Posted by in category: cyborgs

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Oct 28, 2017

This robot is like an extension of your body

Posted by in category: cyborgs

This robot can give anyone superhuman strength. (via CNBC Technology)

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Oct 28, 2017

Advanced artificial limbs mapped in the brain

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cyborgs, robotics/AI

EPFL scientists from the Center for Neuroprosthetics have used functional MRI to show how the brain re-maps motor and sensory pathways following targeted motor and sensory reinnervation (TMSR), a neuroprosthetic approach where residual limb nerves are rerouted towards intact muscles and skin regions to control a robotic limb.

Targeted motor and sensory reinnervation (TMSR) is a surgical procedure on patients with amputations that reroutes residual limb nerves towards intact muscles and skin in order to fit them with a limb prosthesis allowing unprecedented control. By its nature, TMSR changes the way the brain processes motor control and somatosensory input; however the detailed brain mechanisms have never been investigated before and the success of TMSR prostheses will depend on our ability to understand the ways the brain re-maps these pathways. Now, EPFL scientists have used ultra-high field 7 Tesla fMRI to show how TMSR affects upper-limb representations in the brains of patients with amputations, in particular in primary and the and regions processing more complex brain functions. The findings are published in Brain.

Targeted motor and sensory reinnervation (TMSR) is used to improve the control of upper limb prostheses. Residual nerves from the amputated limb are transferred to reinnervate and activate new muscle targets. This way, a patient fitted with a TMSR prosthetic “sends” motor commands to the re-innervated muscles, where his or her movement intentions are decoded and sent to the prosthetic limb. On the other hand, direct stimulation of the skin over the re-innervated muscles is sent back to the brain, inducing touch perception on the missing limb.

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