Menu

Blog

Archive for the ‘health’ category

Jun 21, 2021

Rates of Parkinson’s disease are exploding. A common chemical may be to blame

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, health

Most cases of Parkinson’s disease are considered idiopathic – they lack a clear cause. Yet researchers increasingly believe that one factor is environmental exposure to trichloroethylene (TCE), a chemical compound used in industrial degreasing, dry-cleaning and household products such as some shoe polishes and carpet cleaners.

To date, the clearest evidence around the risk of TCE to human health is derived from workers who are exposed to the chemical in the work-place. A 2008 peer-reviewed study in the Annals of Neurology, for example, found that TCE is “a risk factor for parkinsonism.” And a 2011 study echoed those results, finding “a six-fold increase in the risk of developing Parkinson’s in individuals exposed in the workplace to trichloroethylene (TCE).”

Dr Samuel Goldman of The Parkinson’s Institute in Sunnyvale, California, who co-led the study, which appeared in the Annals of Neurology journal, wrote: “Our study confirms that common environmental contaminants may increase the risk of developing Parkinson’s, which has considerable public health implications.” It was off the back of studies like these that the US Department of Labor issued a guidance on TCE, saying: “The Board recommends […] exposures to carbon disulfide (CS2) and trichloroethylene (TCE) be presumed to cause, contribute, or aggravate Parkinsonism.”

Continue reading “Rates of Parkinson’s disease are exploding. A common chemical may be to blame” »

Jun 21, 2021

Could a Nasal Spray of Designer Antibodies Help to Beat COVID-19?

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, health

There are now several monoclonal antibodies, identical copies of a therapeutic antibody produced in large numbers, that are authorized for the treatment of COVID-19. But in the ongoing effort to beat this terrible pandemic, there’s plenty of room for continued improvements in treating infections with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

With this in mind, I’m pleased to share progress in the development of a specially engineered therapeutic antibody that could be delivered through a nasal spray. Preclinical studies also suggest it may work even better than existing antibody treatments to fight COVID-19, especially now that new SARS-CoV-2 “variants of concern” have become increasingly prevalent.

These findings come from Zhiqiang An, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, and Pei-Yong Shi, The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, and their colleagues. The NIH-supported team recognized that the monoclonal antibodies currently in use all require time-consuming, intravenous infusion at high doses, which has limited their use. Furthermore, because they are delivered through the bloodstream, they aren’t able to reach directly the primary sites of viral infection in the nasal passages and lungs. With the emergence of new SARS-CoV-2 variants, there’s also growing evidence that some of those therapeutic antibodies are becoming less effective in targeting the virus.-Dr Francis Collins.

Continue reading “Could a Nasal Spray of Designer Antibodies Help to Beat COVID-19?” »

Jun 20, 2021

Biologists Raise Alarm: Brain Damage Caused by Even Small Amounts of Plasticizers

Posted by in categories: food, health, neuroscience

The plasticizers contained in many everyday objects can impair important brain functions in humans. Biologists from the University of Bayreuth warn of this danger in an article in Communications Biology. Their study shows that even small amounts of the plasticizers bisphenol A and bisphenol S disrupt the transmission of signals between nerve cells in the brains of fish. The researchers consider it very likely that similar interference can also occur in the brains of adult humans. They, therefore, call for the rapid development of alternative plasticizers that do not pose a risk to the central nervous system.

Bisphenols are plasticizers that are found in a large number of plastic products worldwide — for example, in food packaging, plastic tableware, drinking bottles, toys, tooth fillings, and babies’ dummies. In recent years, numerous health risks have already been associated with them, especially with bisphenol A (BPA). The Bayreuth research team led by Dr. Peter Machnik at the Animal Physiology research group (led by Prof. Dr. Stefan Schuster) has now for the first time investigated the effects of plasticizers on signal transmission between nerve cells in the adult brain. The study covers not only BPA, but also bisphenol S (BPS), which is often considered less harmful to health. Their findings: Both plasticizers impair communication between the nerve cells of the brain.

Jun 18, 2021

Commercial Video Games Could Help Treat Mental Illness

Posted by in categories: entertainment, health, neuroscience, virtual reality

Perhaps better than medication.


Summary: Inexpensive, commercial video games may help those suffering from anxiety and depression to combat their symptoms. Researchers found that, in addition to conventional games, virtual reality games could help people overcome mental health problems.

Source: Lero

Continue reading “Commercial Video Games Could Help Treat Mental Illness” »

Jun 18, 2021

Betelgeuse: A modern cosmic mystery around a massive star has been solved

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health

More than a year later, scientists finally figured out what caused this famous star to dim.


More than half the cosmetics sold in the United States and Canada likely contain high levels of a toxic industrial compound linked to serious health conditions, including cancer and reduced birth weight, according to a new study.

Jun 17, 2021

The Lunar Lantern Could be a Beacon for Humanity on the Moon

Posted by in categories: business, habitats, health, space travel, sustainability

The Lunar Lantern, an intriguing concept for establishing a human presence on the Moon, is currently being featured at the 17th International Architecture Exhibition.


In October of 2024, NASA’s Artemis Program will return astronauts to the surface of the Moon for the first time since the Apollo Era. In the years and decades that follow, multiple space agencies and commercial partners plan to build the infrastructure that will allow for a long-term human presence on the Moon. An important part of these efforts involves building habitats that can ensure the astronauts’ health, safety, and comfort in the extreme lunar environment.

This challenge has inspired architects and designers from all over the world to create innovative and novel ideas for lunar living. One of these is the Lunar Lantern, a base concept developed by ICON (an advanced construction company based in Austin, Texas) as part of a NASA-supported project to build a sustainable outpost on the Moon. This proposal is currently being showcased as part of the 17th International Architecture Exhibition at the La Biennale di Venezia museum in Venice, Italy.

Continue reading “The Lunar Lantern Could be a Beacon for Humanity on the Moon” »

Jun 17, 2021

Study: Half of US cosmetics contain toxic chemicals

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, health

In some products it is not listed as an ingredient.


More than half the cosmetics sold in the United States and Canada likely contain high levels of a toxic industrial compound linked to serious health conditions, including cancer and reduced birth weight, according to a new study.

Jun 16, 2021

Perpetual Life Virtual Party and Brian Clement Ph.D., L.N. of The Hippocrates Health Institute

Posted by in categories: food, health

Thu, jun 17 at 3 PM PDT.


Join us early at 6:00 PM for a Perpetual Life Virtual Party. Then 7 PM presentation with Brian Clement Ph.D., L.N. of The Hippocrates Health Institute.

Brian Clements’s experience with food and lifestyle was like that of most. At the early age of 20, he began his journey to embrace a healthier way of life. Shedding exceptional weight and leaving behind, cigarettes and grass, he finally felt himself for the first time ever. Mature colleagues placed him under their wing and slowly led him down the road via conferences, lectures, and seminars held by some of the historic figures in the modern health movement.

Continue reading “Perpetual Life Virtual Party and Brian Clement Ph.D., L.N. of The Hippocrates Health Institute” »

Jun 16, 2021

A New Challenge For Personalized Cancer Care: The Information Explosion

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health

Automated data searches and new customized patient care are the future of cancer treatment.


Each day information floods into every cancer clinic. Oncologists are scrambling for new ways to tap it to deliver the best of modern cancer care.

This article was produced by Hackensack Meridian Health in partnership with Scientific American Custom Media, a division separate from the magazine’s board of editors.

Continue reading “A New Challenge For Personalized Cancer Care: The Information Explosion” »

Jun 15, 2021

Scientists Link Gut Bacteria to Neurodegenerative Disorders

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, health, neuroscience

Possibly one of the most surprising ways in which our mind and body are interlinked with one another is the gut-brain axis, which is a collection of bidirectional biochemical signals which are transmitted between the nervous system of the body and the digestive system. This is understandably surprising, as the functions of these two distinct parts of the body are completely different to one another. The gut is unlike most other parts of the body, because a large part of its function and health is dictated by cells which are not part of the body, but are instead bacteria cells which colonise the inner lining of the gut.

It has been known for a while now that the makeup of the gut flora changes as we age, which has in turn been linked to cognitive decline through the disruption of the aforementioned gut-brain axis. It has even been shown that faecal transplants can help to correct this cognitive decline in mice, and has been shown to be able to generate a direct positive effect on cognitive function.

Further research into this phenomenon has revealed that the graduate degradation of the gut flora, or more commonly referred to as the ‘good’ bacteria inside the gut has revealed that these bacteria play an important role at keeping unwanted bacteria in check. Researchers at the University Of Florida have found that certain types of ‘good’ bacteria inside the gut produce a chemical known as butyrate, which supresses the growth of pathogenic bacteria such as Enterobacteriaceae. These pathogenic, or ‘bad’ bacteria effect the body in numerous ways, such as interfering with the protein folding, resulting in a build up of toxic and mis-formed proteins within the body. This disruption to protein folding causes problems all across the body, including in the muscles, intestines, gonads, and most notably the brain and central nervous system.

Continue reading “Scientists Link Gut Bacteria to Neurodegenerative Disorders” »

Page 1 of 23412345678Last