Blog

Archive for the ‘health’ category

Jun 14, 2017

Organ chips get smart and go electric

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, engineering, health, neuroscience

Organs-on-Chips (Organ Chips) are emerging as powerful tools that allow researchers to study the physiology of human organs and tissues in ways not possible before. By mimicking normal blood flow, the mechanical microenvironment, and how different tissues physically interface with one another in living organs, they offer a more systematic approach to testing drugs than other in vitro methods that ultimately could help to replace animal testing.

As it can take weeks to grow human cells into intact differentiated and functional tissues within Organ Chips, such as those that mimic the lung and intestine, and researchers seek to understand how drugs, toxins or other perturbations alter tissue structure and function, the team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering led by Donald Ingber has been searching for ways to non-invasively monitor the health and maturity of cells cultured within these microfluidic devices over extended times.

It has been particularly difficult to measure changes in electrical functions of cells grown within Organ Chips that are normally electrically active, such as neuronal cells in the brain or beating heart cells, both during their differentiation and in response to drugs.

Continue reading “Organ chips get smart and go electric” »

Jun 7, 2017

Gene Therapy Might Cure Allergies

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health

Scientists might have found a cure for allergies.

Read more

Jun 7, 2017

Playing a musical instrument could help restore brain health, research suggests

Posted by in categories: computing, health, neuroscience

Tibetan singing bowl (credit: Baycrest Health Sciences)

A study by neuroscientists at Toronto-based Baycrest Rotman Research Institute and Stanford University involving playing a musical instrument suggests ways to improve brain rehabilitation methods.

In the study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience on May 24, 2017, the researchers asked young adults to listen to sounds from an unfamiliar musical instrument (a Tibetan singing bowl). Half of the subjects (the experimental group) were then asked to recreate the same sounds and rhythm by striking the bowl; the other half (the control group) were instead asked to recreate the sound by simply pressing a key on a computer keypad.

Continue reading “Playing a musical instrument could help restore brain health, research suggests” »

Jun 7, 2017

Zoltan Istvan: How Basic Income Can Work In California

Posted by in categories: economics, health

I’m super excited to share a (via NowThis Op-Ed) video of my bipartisan plan to fund a Basic Income, which I call a Federal Land Dividend. This is a main platform issue of my California Libertarian Governor run. This plan can forever end poverty and lack of health care in California and America—and perhaps even end poverty and lack of health care around the world if adopted by foreign governments.


This futurist has a plan to bring basic income to America.

Read more

Jun 6, 2017

Extracting Insight from the Data Deluge is a Hard-to-Do Must-Do

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, economics, health

A mantra of these data-rife times is that within the vast and growing volumes of diverse data types, such as sensor feeds, economic indicators, and scientific and environmental measurements, are dots of significance that can tell important stories, if only those dots could be identified and connected in authentically meaningful ways. Getting good at that exercise of data synthesis and interpretation ought to open new, quicker routes to identifying threats, tracking disease outbreaks, and otherwise answering questions and solving problems that previously were intractable.

Now for a reality check. “Today’s hardware is ill-suited to handle such data challenges, and these challenges are only going to get harder as the amount of data continues to grow exponentially,” said Trung Tran, a program manager in DARPA’s Microsystems Technology Office (MTO). To take on that technology shortfall, MTO last summer unveiled its Hierarchical Identify Verify Exploit (HIVE) program, which has now signed on five performers to carry out HIVE’s mandate: to develop a powerful new data-handling and computing platform specialized for analyzing and interpreting huge amounts of data with unprecedented deftness. “It will be a privilege to work with this innovative team of performers to develop a new category of server processors specifically designed to handle the data workloads of today and tomorrow,” said Tran, who is overseeing HIVE.

The quintet of performers includes a mix of large commercial electronics firms, a national laboratory, a university, and a veteran defense-industry company: Intel Corporation (Santa Clara, California), Qualcomm Intelligent Solutions (San Diego, California), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (Richland, Washington), Georgia Tech (Atlanta, Georgia), and Northrop Grumman (Falls Church, Virginia).

Continue reading “Extracting Insight from the Data Deluge is a Hard-to-Do Must-Do” »

Jun 3, 2017

These 14 billionaires just promised to give away more than half of their money like Bill Gates and Warren Buffett

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, economics, education, health, sustainability

Started in 2010 by Bill and Melinda Gates, worth $88.5 billion, and Warren Buffett, worth $74.2 billion, the Giving Pledge is a commitment by wealthy individuals and families to give away more than half of their wealth to causes including including poverty alleviation, refugee aid, disaster relief, global health, education, women and girls’ empowerment, medical research, arts and culture, criminal justice reform and environmental sustainability.


Started in 2010, the Giving Pledge now includes 168 wealthy individuals and couples from 21 countries.

Read more

May 31, 2017

Whole Body Vibration Offers Many of The Benefits of Exercise

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health

Vibration platforms, belts, and accessories have been touted on late-night infomercials for decades as a simple, convenient alternative to actual exercise, but do they really work?

According to a recent study looking at the effects of whole body vibration on mice, yes, they actually do, by mimicking the benefits of exercise on muscle and bone health, and the researchers think the technique could help treat human health conditions too.

“Our study is the first to show that whole body vibration may be just as effective as exercise at combating some of the negative consequences of obesity and diabetes,” says cellular biologist Meghan E. McGee-Lawrence from Augusta University.

Continue reading “Whole Body Vibration Offers Many of The Benefits of Exercise” »

May 27, 2017

The Exercise Pill?

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health

Scientists are working on a pill that could replace exercise.

Read more

May 24, 2017

Trump budget would slash science programmes across government

Posted by in categories: government, health, science

Proposed cuts include 11% at the National Science Foundation, 18% at the National Institutes of Health and 30% at the Environmental Protection Agency.

Read more

May 19, 2017

What is Plant-Based Meat?

Posted by in categories: environmental, ethics, food, futurism, health, science

A type of food that has been around for centuries, but is primed to be increasingly relevant to the future: Plant-Based “Meat.”

In this video series, the Galactic Public Archives takes bite-sized looks at a variety of terms, technologies, and ideas that are likely to be prominent in the future. Terms are regularly changing and being redefined with the passing of time. With constant breakthroughs and the development of new technology and other resources, we seek to define what these things are and how they will impact our future.

Continue reading “What is Plant-Based Meat?” »

Page 1 of 6212345678Last