Blog

Archive for the ‘ethics’ category

Apr 16, 2017

The Transhumanist Future Has No Pope

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, ethics, transhumanism

Happy Easter…and a reality check: https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/where-were-going-we-dont-need-popes #transhumanism #reason


Modern values, transhumanist technology, and the embrace of reason are making many Catholic rules and rituals absurd.

Everywhere I look, Pope Francis, the 266th pope of the Catholic Church, seems to be in the news—and he is being positively portrayed as a genuinely progressive leader. Frankly, this baffles me. Few major religions have as backwards a philosophical and moral platform as Catholicism. Therefore, no leader of it could actually be genuinely progressive. Yet, no one seems to pay attention to this—no one seems to be discussing that Catholicism remains highly oppressive.

Continue reading “The Transhumanist Future Has No Pope” »

Apr 9, 2017

The Cybernetic Messiah: Transhumanism and Artificial Intelligence

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, business, Elon Musk, ethics, existential risks, robotics/AI, space travel, transhumanism

Some weird religious stories w/ transhumanism Expect the conflict between religion and transhumanism to get worse, as closed-minded conservative viewpoints get challenged by radical science and a future with no need for an afterlife: http://barbwire.com/2017/04/06/cybernetic-messiah-transhuman…elligence/ & http://www.livebytheword.blog/google-directors-push-for-comp…s-explain/ & http://ctktexas.com/pastoral-backstory-march-30th-2017/


By J. Davila Ashcroft

The recent film Ghost in the Shell is a science fiction tale about a young girl (known as Major) used as an experiment in a Transhumanist/Artificial Intelligence experiment, turning her into a weapon. At first, she complies, thinking the company behind the experiment saved her life after her family died. The truth is, however, that the company took her forcefully while she was a runaway. Major finds out that this company has done the same to others as well, and this knowledge causes her to turn on the company. Throughout the story the viewer is confronted with the existential questions behind such an experiment as Major struggles with the trauma of not feeling things like the warmth of human skin, and the sensations of touch and taste, and feels less than human, though she is told many times she is better than human. While this is obviously a science fiction story, what might comes as a surprise to some is that the subject matter of the film is not just fiction. Transhumanism and Artificial Intelligence on the level of the things explored in this film are all too real, and seem to be only a few years around the corner.

Continue reading “The Cybernetic Messiah: Transhumanism and Artificial Intelligence” »

Apr 6, 2017

Towards an Artificial Brain

Posted by in categories: biological, ethics, information science, neuroscience, robotics/AI

The fast-advancing fields of neuroscience and computer science are on a collision course. David Cox, Assistant Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology and Computer Science at Harvard, explains how his lab is working with others to reverse engineer how brains learn, starting with rats. By shedding light on what our machine learning algorithms are currently missing, this work promises to improve the capabilities of robots – with implications for jobs, laws and ethics.

http://www.weforum.org/

Continue reading “Towards an Artificial Brain” »

Apr 4, 2017

“… both natural selection and the historical record offer powerful reasons for doubting the trustworthiness of our naive moral intuitions

Posted by in categories: education, ethics

So the possibility that human civilisation might be founded upon some monstrous evil should be taken seriously — even if the possibility seems transparently absurd at the time.”

David Pearce


The Hedonistic Imperative Documentary

Continue reading “‘… both natural selection and the historical record offer powerful reasons for doubting the trustworthiness of our naive moral intuitions” »

Apr 3, 2017

Is It Moral to Enslave AI?

Posted by in categories: ethics, robotics/AI

Philosopher Daniel Dennett believes AI should never become conscious — and no, it’s not because of the robopocalypse.

Read more

Mar 29, 2017

IEEE Global Initiative Aims to Advance Ethical Design of AI and Autonomous Systems

Posted by in categories: ethics, information science, robotics/AI

Algorithms with learning abilities collect personal data that are then used without users’ consent and even without their knowledge; autonomous weapons are under discussion in the United Nations; robots stimulating emotions are deployed with vulnerable people; research projects are funded to develop humanoid robots; and artificial intelligence-based systems are used to evaluate people. One can consider these examples of AI and autonomous systems (AS) as great achievements or claim that they are endangering human freedom and dignity.

We need to make sure that these technologies are aligned to humans in terms of our moral values and ethical principles to fully benefit from the potential of them. AI and AS have to behave in a way that is beneficial to people beyond reaching functional goals and addressing technical problems. This will allow for an elevated level of trust for technology that is needed for a fruitful pervasive use of AI/AS in our daily lives.

Read more

Mar 28, 2017

Why Aging Is a Disease

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, economics, ethics, policy, robotics/AI, space, transhumanism

The first of my major #Libertarian policy articles for my California gubernatorial run, which broadens the foundational “non-aggression principle” to so-called negative natural phenomena. “In my opinion, and to most #transhumanist libertarians, death and aging are enemies of the people and of liberty (perhaps the greatest ones), similar to foreign invaders running up our shores.” A coordinated defense agianst them is philosophically warranted.


Many societies and social movements operate under a foundational philosophy that often can be summed up in a few words. Most famously, in much of the Western world, is the Golden Rule: Do onto others as you want them to do to you. In libertarianism, the backbone of the political philosophy is the non-aggression principle (NAP). It argues it’s immoral for anyone to use force against another person or their property except in cases of self-defense.

A challenge has recently been posed to the non-aggression principle. The thorny question libertarian transhumanists are increasingly asking in the 21st century is: Are so-called natural acts or occurrences immoral if they cause people to suffer? After all, taken to a logical philosophical extreme, cancer, aging, and giant asteroids arbitrarily crashing into the planet are all aggressive, forceful acts that harm the lives of humans.

Continue reading “Why Aging Is a Disease” »

Mar 27, 2017

Rejuvenation would cause cultural stagnation

Posted by in categories: ethics, life extension

Is the risk of cultural stagnation a valid objection to rejuvenation therapies? You guessed it—nope.


This objection can be discussed from both a moral and a practical point of view. This article discusses the matter from a moral standpoint, and concludes it is a morally unacceptable objection. (Bummer, now I’ve spoiled it all for you.)

However, even if the objection can be dismissed on moral grounds, one may still argue that, hey, it may be immoral to let old people die to avoid cultural and social stagnation, but it’s still necessary.

Continue reading “Rejuvenation would cause cultural stagnation” »

Mar 21, 2017

10 people to follow if you want a career in AI

Posted by in categories: ethics, robotics/AI, space

Want a career in AI and robotics? One of the best ways to enrich your knowledge about the sector is to follow these AI influencers.

March of the Machines

Continue reading “10 people to follow if you want a career in AI” »

Mar 17, 2017

Scattered thoughts on self-awareness and AI

Posted by in categories: ethics, robotics/AI

A few ideas on self-awareness and self-aware AIs.


I’ve always been a fan of androids as intended in Star Trek. More generally, I think the idea of an artificial intelligence with whom you can talk and to whom you can teach things is really cool. I admit it is just a little bit weird that I find the idea of teaching things to small children absolutely unattractive while finding thrilling the idea of doing the same to a machine, but that’s just the way it is for me. (I suppose the fact a machine is unlikely to cry during the night and need to have its diaper changed every few hours might well be a factor at play here.)

Improvements in the field of AI are pretty much commonplace these days, though we’re not yet at the point where we could be talking to a machine in natural language and be unable to tell the difference with a human. I used to take for granted that, one day, we would have androids who are self-aware and have emotions, exactly like people, with all the advantages of being a machine—such as mental multitasking, large computational power, and more efficient memory. While I still like the idea, nowadays I wonder if it is actually a feasible or sensible one.

Continue reading “Scattered thoughts on self-awareness and AI” »

Page 1 of 3012345678Last