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Archive for the ‘ethics’ category

Jan 4, 2020

Steven Kwast | The Urgent Need for a U.S. Space Force

Posted by in categories: education, engineering, ethics, government, law, policy, sex, space

Starfleet Begins


Steven L. Kwast is a retired Air Force general and former commander of the Air Education and Training Command at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph. A graduate of the United States Air Force Academy with a degree in astronautical engineering, he holds a master’s degree in public policy from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He is a past president of the Air Force’s Air University in Montgomery, Alabama, and a former fighter pilot with extensive combat and command experience. He is the author of the study, “Fast Space: Leveraging Ultra Low-Cost Space Access for 21st Century Challenges.”

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Jan 3, 2020

50 Year Lie: Sugar industry blames fats

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, business, economics, education, ethics, food, health, science

Whenever someone refers me to a story with alarming facts that should surprise or outrage any thinking human, my spider-sense is activated. Does the story make sense? Is it plausible? If the message contains evidence of being repeated (or forwarded to more than two friends), then whatever is claimed is almost certain to be false.

If the subject is important to me—or if there is any chance that it might influence my view of the world, I check it at Snopes. The reputable web site confirms or debunks many urban legends and all sorts of viral web hype.

You never know what you might learn at Snopes. You can easily be lured into a rabbit hole, digging into the site beyond whatever prompted your visit in the first place.

Fact-checking can be fun! For example:

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Jan 2, 2020

Why scientists are transplanting artificially grown “brains” into living brains

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, ethics

Scientists are making major strides in growing fully functional “mini brains” — but what are the ethics of such science?

Dec 25, 2019

7 Classic Books To Deepen Your Understanding of Artificial Intelligence

Posted by in categories: business, ethics, robotics/AI

The field of artificial intelligence has never been the subject of more attention and analysis than it is today. Almost every week, it seems, a new bestselling book comes out examining the technology, business or ethics of AI.

Yet few of the topics and debates at the center of today’s AI discourse are new. While not always recognized by commentators, artificial intelligence as a serious academic discipline dates back to the 1950s. For well over half a century, many of the world’s leading minds have devoted themselves to the pursuit of machine intelligence and have grappled with what it would mean to succeed in that pursuit.

Much of the public discourse around AI in 2019 has been anticipated—and influenced—by AI thought leaders going back decades.

Dec 25, 2019

The complicated ethics of genetic engineering

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, ethics, genetics

With new technology to edit genes, scientists are now working on things that once seemed impossible. But what are the boundaries? See the full 60 Minutes interview with Church, here: https://cbsn.ws/34ZhuTs

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Dec 18, 2019

The science news events that shaped 2019

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, computing, ethics, quantum physics, science, space

A year marked by climate protests, political uncertainty and debate over the ethics of gene editing in human embryos proved challenging for science. But researchers also celebrated some exciting firsts — a quantum computer that can outperform its classical counterparts, a photo of a black hole and samples gathered from an asteroid.


Climate strikes, marsquakes and gaming AIs are among the year’s top stories.

Dec 13, 2019

Can We Apply Human Ethics to Robots?

Posted by in categories: ethics, robotics/AI

Who is responsible when a robot harms a human? Robot ethics tackle this and other interesting robot issues.

Nov 30, 2019

Scientists Get the Green Light to Create Human-Animal Hybrids in Japan

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, ethics, government, life extension

Human-animal hybrids are set to be developed at the University of Tokyo after the Japanese government recently lifted a ban on the controversial stem-cell research.

Hiromitsu Nakauchi—director for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at the University of Tokyo and team leader at Stanford’s Nakauchi Lab—is the first to receive approval for the questionable experiments which will attempt to grow human cells in rat and mouse embryos before being brought to term in a surrogate animal.

Despite many feeling that such studies are the equivalent of playing God, scientists say that the objective is far from sinister. It’s theorized that developing animals with organs constructed from human cells will create organs that can then be used for transplants in humans, cutting the long organ donation waitlists.

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Nov 22, 2019

Ray Kurzweil (USA) at Ci2019 — The Future of Intelligence, Artificial and Natural

Posted by in categories: employment, engineering, ethics, media & arts, Ray Kurzweil, robotics/AI, singularity

The Future of Intelligence, Artificial and Natural
https://www.creativeinnovationglobal.com.au

Ray Kurzweil is one of the world’s leading inventors, thinkers, and futurists, with a thirty-year track record of accurate predictions. Called “the restless genius” by The Wall Street Journal and “the ultimate thinking machine” by Forbes magazine, he was selected as one of the top entrepreneurs by Inc. magazine, which described him as the “rightful heir to Thomas Edison.” PBS selected him as one of the “sixteen revolutionaries who made America.”

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Nov 19, 2019

Brent Nally interviews Dr. Michael Fossel about Telocyte and telomerase gene therapy on 11/16/2019

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, ethics, finance, life extension, media & arts, neuroscience, transhumanism

Haven’t heard from Fossel in awhile. This is long but well indexed in the notes.


My mission is to drastically improve your life by helping you break bad habits, build and keep new healthy habits to make you the best version of yourself.

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