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Archive for the ‘media & arts’ category

Mar 22, 2017

Free The Art: Cryptocurrencies & communities unite with creators

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, cryptocurrencies, entertainment, finance, fun, innovation, media & arts, open source, thought controlled

by Tatiana Moroz

The most moving thing to me about music is it’s ability to change. It changes the mood, the atmosphere, and it fills us with emotion. It can unify mankind in the power of good and triumph over evil regimes. What most struck me was when we saw this in the 60’s and 70’s folk songs that became anthems for the civil rights, equality, and antiwar movements. Even as a little girl, I knew that this core drive and expression for freedom was critical to the success of humanity as we marched ever closer to the nightmarish visions painted in 1984 and Brave New World.

This is a heavy and serious purpose, but one I took to heart as I created songs of hope, sadness, life, beauty and love. I noticed that the music industry seemed averse to this type of meaning based songwriting, and the radio waves were filling with more vapid nonsense by the minute. However, I kept my head down and tried to educate myself on the ways we could organize society for the better.

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Mar 20, 2017

The World’s First Personal Robot

Posted by in categories: habitats, media & arts, robotics/AI

TechCrunch: “You’ll soon be coming home and a robot will greet you at the door.”

VentureBeat: “Read to kids, host video chats, take pictures, recognize faces and objects, connect to smart home devices, and secure the home by roaming around and video taping everything.”

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Mar 18, 2017

You Can Ban a Person, But What About Their Hologram?

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, holograms, law, media & arts

If you think augmented reality is only fun and games, consider that we’ve already witnessed the first known police action taken against hologram technology. During the summer of 2015, a performance by controversial gangster-rapper, Keith Cozart, was shut down when local police discovered the musician was broadcast as a hologram into a benefit concert in Indiana—close to the border of his home state of Illinois.

Cozart, who goes by the stage name “Chief Keef,” is from a rough neighborhood in Chicago, and has ties to local gangs as well as a criminal record including felony gun charges. His music, which glamorizes a gang lifestyle and violence, has prompted public officials—including Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel—to pressure music festivals to avoid inviting Cozart because they say it poses a “significant public safety risk.”

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Mar 14, 2017

May 18–21, 2017

Posted by in categories: life extension, media & arts, transhumanism

I’ll be speaking on #transhumanism and the Immortality Bus at Moogfest this year in N. Carolina, May 18–21. My talk is currently schedued for Saturday, the 20th. Come hear about my journey across America in a 90 minute presentation, full of anecdotes and descriptions of the wild adventure:

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Feb 24, 2017

The Chess Turk explained

Posted by in categories: media & arts, robotics/AI

Wonder what Google thinks about this version of a robot playing Chess from 1769. The point is, we really have struggled in AI particularly robotics for over 250 years.


As you can hear I’m not a native speaker. Please execuse grammatical and pronunciation mistakes.

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Feb 21, 2017

Rhythmic brain circuits built from stem cells

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, media & arts, neuroscience

Why not as we will see we will indeed require cell circuited technology for QBS to be full effective/ enhanced.


The TV commercial is nearly 20 years old but I remember it vividly: a couple is driving down a street when they suddenly realize the music on their tape deck is in sync with the repetitive activity on the street. From the guy casually dribbling a basketball to people walking along the sidewalk to the delivery people passing packages out of their truck, everything and everyone is moving rhythmically to the beat.

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Jan 29, 2017

LSD alters perception via serotonin receptors

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, media & arts, neuroscience

Interesting study on brain receptors.


Researchers from UZH have discovered how the perception of meaning changes in the brain under the influence of LSD. The serotonin 2A receptors are responsible for altered perception. This finding will help develop new courses of pharmacotherapy for psychiatric disorders such as depression, addictions or phobias.

Humans perceive everyday things and experiences differently and attach different meaning to pieces of music, for instance. In the case of psychiatric disorders, this perception is often altered. For patients suffering from addictions, for instance, drug stimuli are more meaningful than for people without an addiction. Or patients with phobias perceive the things or situations that scare them with exaggerated significance compared to healthy people. A heightened negative perception of the self is also characteristic of depressive patients. Just how this so-called personal relevance develops in the brain and which neuropharmacological mechanisms are behind it, however, have remained unclear.

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Jan 28, 2017

Will Robots Be the Solution to a Growing Demand for Assisted Living?

Posted by in categories: media & arts, robotics/AI

Actually, I have began looking seriously into an at home robot for my home; still not where I want them to be why I began looking closer and more seriously at building my own line.


One of the coming great challenges of senior care is facilitating assisted living, according to experts. The so-called Baby Boomer generation that is now entering retirement age lives longer, expects the world from its twilight years, and insists on staying independent for as long as possible. Most Boomers don’t even think about going out quietly, withering away in homes that offer little more than warehousing. Instead, they want to stay active and engaged until the very end, and they welcome all the help they can get to achieve that goal. And when they cannot do it anymore on their own, futuristic technology like robots for personal use may just be the ticket.

If you have seen the 2012 movie “Robot & Frank,” you already had a – albeit comical – glimpse of how the future of assisted living might look like. In a nutshell, the story is about the “relationship” between an elderly gentleman (played by Frank Langella), who just retired from a lifetime career as a cat burglar, and a humanoid robot given to him by his children as a home caretaker. Of course, the film’s particular angle on robotic technology is not to be taken too seriously. But the fact is that intelligent machines are progressively affecting every aspect of life as we know it, and will do so much more in coming years.

On a recent trip to Tokyo, I had the chance to see for myself how far we have already moved in that direction. Here, robots designed for personal assistance are readily available in department stores, just like any other household appliances. Although, many of the existing models have only limited capabilities like finding information on the Internet or compiling music playlists, or even less useful features like responding with a cute smile and offering a handshake when approached, it is clear that these creatures of our own making will eventually be the ones we partner up with on countless tasks, both at work and in our homes.

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Jan 22, 2017

Singularity CGI

Posted by in categories: media & arts, robotics/AI, singularity

Carrie Fisher just died but she will likely come back to life because the Singularity is Near and is bringing Singularity CGI with it!

Bringing the dead back to life

In the latest Star Wars movie, Rogue One, five characters were brought back as they would have looked between episodes 3 and 4 of Star Wars. They were Princess Leia, Grand Moff Tarkin, Dr. Cornelius Evazan (who said “I have the death sentence on twelve systems” in episode 4), General Dodonna, and Mon Mothma. General Dodonna and Mon Mothma were brought back with the traditional method of using actors who looked similar to the original actors. The other three were brought back with CGI (computer-generated imagery), more specifically CGI enhanced with motion capture.

Princess Leia (Carrie Fisher) created by computer in Rogue One (credit: Lucasfilm)

Grand Moff Tarkin created by computer in Rogue One (credit: Lucasfilm)
(He looks better because he had more screen time so they spent more money on him.)

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Jan 15, 2017

The Copenhagen Wheel official product release

Posted by in categories: media & arts, mobile phones, transportation

Pre-order at http://www.superpedestrian.com This is the first commercial version of the Copenhagen Wheel. Now available for sale.
Own a limited edition, hand-crafted Copenhagen Wheel, invented and built in Cambridge, MA.

The Copenhagen wheel Technical specifications:
MOTOR US: 350W / EU: 250W
WEELE SIZE 26″ or 700c rim
BATTERY Removable 48Volt Lithium
CONNECTIVITY Bluetooth 4.0
BATTERY LIFE 1000 cycles
SMARTPHONE OS iOS, Android
CHARGE TIME 4 hours
COMPATIBILITY Single Speed or 9/10 Speed Free Hub (email us your bike specs if you have doubts: [email protected])
TOP SPEED US: 20 mph
EU: 25 km/h
BRAKE TYPE Rim brake and regenerative braking (downhill and back-pedal)
RANGE Up to 50 km / 31 mi
WEIGHT 5.9 kg / 13 lbs
DROPOUT 135 mm

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