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Archive for the ‘physics’ category

Mar 24, 2017

Gravitational waves pushing a supermassive black hole around its galaxy at about 8 million km/h

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics

Meanwhile, the Hubble image offered a clue about what dislodged the black hole from its galaxy’s centre. The host galaxy bore faint, arc-shaped features called tidal tales, which are produced by the gravitational tug-of-war that takes place when two galaxies collide. This suggested that galaxy 3C 186 had recently merged with another system, and perhaps their black holes merged too.

What happened next, scientists can only theorize. Chiaberge and his colleagues suggest that as the galaxies collided, their black holes began to circle each other, flinging out gravity waves “like water from a lawn sprinkler,” as NASA described it. If the black holes had unequal masses and spin rates, they might have sent more gravitational waves in one direction than the other. When the collision was complete, the newly merged black hole would have then recoiled from the strongest gravitational waves, shooting off in the opposite direction.

“This asymmetry depends on properties such as the mass and the relative orientation of the back holes’ rotation axes before the merger,” Colin Norman of STScI and Johns Hopkins University, a co-author on the paper, said in the NASA news release. “That’s why these objects are so rare.”

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Mar 23, 2017

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

Posted by in categories: cosmology, habitats, physics

Astronomers have uncovered a supermassive black hole that has been propelled out of the center of a distant galaxy by what could be the awesome power of gravitational waves.

Though there have been several other suspected, similarly booted black holes elsewhere, none has been confirmed so far. Astronomers think this object, detected by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, is a very strong case. Weighing more than 1 billion suns, the rogue black hole is the most massive black hole ever detected to have been kicked out of its central home.

Researchers estimate that it took the equivalent energy of 100 million supernovas exploding simultaneously to jettison the black hole. The most plausible explanation for this propulsive energy is that the monster object was given a kick by gravitational waves unleashed by the merger of two hefty black holes at the center of the host galaxy.

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Mar 13, 2017

Synthetic Stars and the Future of Energy — By Dr. Edward Moses | TEDxSF

Posted by in categories: astronomy, energy, environmental, physics

Mar 10, 2017

Superhero Plan to Time Travel in Large Hadron Collider Just Might Work

Posted by in categories: energy, physics, time travel

A universe-opening theory suggested in issue 3 of the Justice League/Power Rangers comic book series has roots in real physics.

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Mar 8, 2017

It’s Official: Time Crystals Are a New State of Matter, and Now We Can Create Them

Posted by in categories: energy, physics

Earlier this year, physicists had put together a blueprint for how to make and measure time crystals — a bizarre state of matter with an atomic structure that repeats not just in space, but in time, allowing them to maintain constant oscillation without energy.

Two separate research teams managed to create what looked an awful lot like time crystals back in January, and now both experiments have successfully passed peer-review for the first time, putting the ‘impossible’ phenomenon squarely in the realm of reality.

“We’ve taken these theoretical ideas that we’ve been poking around for the last couple of years and actually built it in the laboratory,” says one of the researchers, Andrew Potter from Texas University at Austin.

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Mar 6, 2017

How To Build A Home Fusion Reactor

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, physics

The tale of a teen physics prodigy.

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Feb 26, 2017

You are a Simulation & Physics Can Prove It ׃ George Smoot

Posted by in category: physics

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Feb 22, 2017

Group develops deep, non-invasive imaging of mouse brain

Posted by in categories: engineering, neuroscience, physics

A three-photon microscopic video of neurons in a mouse brain. The imaging depth is approximately 1 millimeter below the surface of the brain. The firing of the neurons is captured by an indicator that is based on green fluorescent protein GFP, which glows brighter as the neuron sends a signal.

Nearly four years ago, then-President Obama launched the BRAIN (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies) Initiative, to “accelerate the development and application of new technologies that will enable researchers to produce dynamic pictures of the brain.”

Several of the program’s initial funding awards went to Cornell’s Chris Xu, the Mong Family Foundation Director of Cornell Neurotech – Engineering, and professor and director of undergraduate studies in applied and engineering physics. Xu’s projects aimed to develop new imaging techniques to achieve large scale, noninvasive imaging of neuronal activity.

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Feb 21, 2017

Pres. Trump Chooses Science Advisor

Posted by in categories: chemistry, climatology, military, physics, science, space

Congrats Dr. Happer.


I’ve been waiting to find out who will be Pres. Trump’s science adviser. It appears to be physicist Dr. William Happer, a physicist currently teaching at Princeont University, and former Director of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science from 1991–1993. He’s no slouch as a scientist. His work for the Air Force on the sodium guidestar laser platform for the military’s missile defense program provided information on the tropopause layer in the upper atmosphere, which is where atmospheric wave fronts distort both starlight and laser emissions, and where heat either begins to leak into space or does not, depending on how much and what kind of gas is blocking heat radiation.

The tropopause is the boundary between the troposphere, where we live and where weather takes place, and the stratosphere. The layers above that are the stratosphere, where stratocirrus clouds form as floating clouds of ice, the mesosphere, the thermosphere and the top, very thin layer, the exosphere. Beyond that is space.

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Feb 21, 2017

Thanks to LIGO We Can Now Produce Our Very Own Gravitational Waves

Posted by in category: physics

It was a great moment for physicists and scientists around the world in 2016 when one of the greatest ever scientific discoveries was announced. Although technically the first gravitational waves were detected in 2015, it wasn’t until further detections were made in 2016 that scientists finally conceded they did exist and that Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity could finally be proved. Following on from that, scientists also discovered that as well as a great detector LIGO is the best producer of gravitational waves.

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