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Archive for the ‘physics’ category

Oct 21, 2021

‘Time is elastic’: Why time passes faster atop a mountain than at sea level

Posted by in category: physics

The idea of ‘absolute time’ is an illusion. Physics and subjective experience reveal why.

Oct 21, 2021

Ancient black holes: New research reveals a surprising truth

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics

Is there anything out there?


The concept of primordial black holes has waxed and waned in scientific circles over the decades. At first, it was a fascinating possibility. After all, the first few seconds of the big bang were pretty heady times, and there may have been large enough differences in density to generate black holes of all sorts of sizes, from microscopic to gigantic. But repeated observations have continually been unable to come up with any conclusive evidence for their existence.

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Oct 20, 2021

Finding this cosmic phenomenon could unlock mysteries of the ancient universe

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics

Low-frequency gravitational waves could unlock the secrets of the ancient universe.


But scientists still can’t detect these waves at low frequencies that are often the result of even more massive objects colliding with one another or events that took place shortly after the Big Bang.

A team of researchers from the University of Birmingham suggests combining different methods to detect ultra low-frequency gravitational waves that hold the mystery of ancient black holes and the early universe.

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Oct 17, 2021

Planetary Defense: Physicists Propose New Way To Defend Earth Against Cosmic Impacts

Posted by in categories: asteroid/comet impacts, existential risks, physics

Is Planetary Defense PI in the Sky?

In February of 2,013 skywatchers around the world turned their attention toward asteroid 2012 DA14, a cosmic rock about 150 feet (50 meters) in diameter that was going to fly closer to Earth than the spacecraft that bring us satellite TV.

Little did they realize as they prepared for the once-in-several-decades event that another bit of celestial debris was hurtling toward Earth, with a more direct heading. On February 15 2013, the Chelyabinsk meteor, a roughly 62-foot (19 meter)-diameter asteroid exploded over the city of Chelyabinsk, Russia, as it entered Earth’s atmosphere at a shallow angle. The blast shattered windows and damaged buildings, and nearly two thousand people were hurt, though thankfully no one died.

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Oct 17, 2021

How to Rewrite the Laws of Physics in the Language of Impossibility

Posted by in category: physics

Chiara Marletto is trying to build a master theory — a set of ideas so fundamental that all other theories would spring from it. Her first step: Invoke the impossible.

Oct 13, 2021

Physicists Have Made the World’s Most Precise Measurement of Neutron Lifetime

Posted by in category: physics

An international team of researchers has made the world’s most precise measurement of the neutron’s lifetime, which may help answer questions about the early universe.

An international team of physicists led by researchers at Indiana University Bloomington has announced the world’s most precise measurement of the neutron’s lifetime.

The results from the team, which encompasses scientists from over 10 national labs and universities in the United States and abroad, represent a more than two-fold improvement over previous measurements — with an uncertainty of less than one-tenth of a percent.

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Oct 12, 2021

Physicists announce the world’s most precise measurement of neutron lifetime

Posted by in category: physics

An international team of physicists led by researchers at Indiana University Bloomington has announced the world’s most precise measurement of the neutron’s lifetime.

Oct 10, 2021

Astrophysicists explain the origin of unusually heavy neutron star binaries

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics

A new study showing how the explosion of a stripped massive star in a supernova can lead to the formation of a heavy neutron star or a light black hole resolves one of the most challenging puzzles to emerge from the detection of neutron star mergers by the gravitational wave observatories LIGO and Virgo.

The first detection of gravitational waves by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) in 2017 was a star merger that mostly conformed to the expectations of astrophysicists. But the second detection, in 2,019 was a merger of two whose combined mass was unexpectedly large.

“It was so shocking that we had to start thinking about how to create a heavy neutron star without making it a pulsar,” said Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz, professor of astronomy and astrophysics at UC Santa Cruz.

Oct 10, 2021

Faster-Than-Light Travel Is Possible Within Einstein’s Physics, Astrophysicist Shows

Posted by in category: physics

For decades, we’ve dreamed of visiting other star systems. There’s just one problem – they’re so far away, with conventional spaceflight it would take tens of thousands of years to reach even the closest one.

Physicists are not the kind of people who give up easily, though. Give them an impossible dream, and they’ll give you an incredible, hypothetical way of making it a reality. Maybe.

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Oct 10, 2021

Nobel Prize for physics winner shaped observing mission

Posted by in categories: climatology, physics, sustainability

Professor Hasselmann developed a method for satellite ocean wave measurements.


This year’s Nobel Prize in Physics laureate Klaus Hasselmann helped to shape a ground-breaking Earth-observation mission that paved the way for the modern study of our planet’s environment.

The German oceanographer and climate modeler was awarded the coveted prize for his contribution to the physical modeling of Earth’s climate that has enabled scientists to quantify the climate’s natural variability and better predict climate change. Hasselman won half of the 2021 Nobel Prize for Physics last week, with the other half shared by scientists Syukuro Manabe and Giorgio Parisi for their own research on disorder and fluctuations in physical systems.

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