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Archive for the ‘Death’ tag

May 4, 2018

Bioquark Inc. — NHK Japan — Future of Resuscitation Science

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biotech/medical, cryonics, disruptive technology, DNA, genetics, health, life extension, transhumanism

Mar 6, 2018

What happens to your Bitcoin if you die or forget passwords?

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, cryptocurrencies, economics, finance, internet, law

Legacy Method of Inheriting Assets

Many Bitcoin owners choose to use a custodial account, in which the private keys to a wallet are generated and controlled by their exchange—or even a bank or stock broker. In this case, funds are passed to heirs in the usual way. It works like this…

An executor, probate attorney, or someone with a legal claim contacts the organization that controls the assets. They present a death certificate, medical proxy or power-of-attorney. Just as with your bank account or stocks and bonds, you have the option of listing next of kin and the proportion of your assets that should be distributed to each. These custodial services routinely ask you to list individuals younger than you and alternate heirs, along with their street addresses, in the event that someone you list has died before you.

Of course, Bitcoin purists and Libertarians point out that the legacy method contradicts the whole point of owning a cryptocurrency. Fair enough.

Continue reading “What happens to your Bitcoin if you die or forget passwords?” »

Feb 23, 2018

Bioquark Inc. — Life After Death Technologies — Nation Swell

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biotech/medical, cryonics, futurism, genetics, health, life extension, science, transhumanism

http://nationswell.com/life-after-death-technologies/

Jan 25, 2018

Bioquark Inc. — Best Damn Podcast — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, business, cosmology, cryonics, DNA, futurism, genetics, health, life extension

https://player.fm/series/best-damn-podcast/interview-w-ira-p…generation

Jan 23, 2018

Bioquark Inc. — Staying Alive UK Show — Ira S. Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biotech/medical, business, disruptive technology, DNA, futurism, genetics, health, neuroscience

https://www.stayingaliveuk.com/podcast/2018/1/0036-ira-s-pas…trepreneur

Jan 22, 2018

Bioquark Inc. — The Richard Syrett Show — Ira Pastor — Bioregeneration

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biotech/medical, bitcoin, cosmology, cryonics, disruptive technology, DNA, futurism, health

Jan 22, 2018

Bioquark Inc. — HVMN Enhancement Podcast — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biotech/medical, disruptive technology, DNA, futurism, genetics, health, innovation, life extension

Dec 15, 2017

Bioquark Inc. — Ira Pastor — Life After Death Society Podcast

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biological, cosmology, cryonics, disruptive technology, DNA, futurism, genetics, health

http://oddtonewfoundland.podbean.com/e/and-man-shall-live-fo…a-spastor/

Jul 5, 2017

Revita Life Sciences Continues to Advance Multi-Modality Protocol in Attempt to Revive Brain Dead Subjects

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, cryonics, futurism, genetics, health, life extension, neuroscience, posthumanism

Revita Life Sciences, (http://revitalife.co.in) a biotechnology company focused on translational regenerative therapeutic applications, has announced that it is continuing to advance their novel, multi-modality clinical intervention in the state of brain death in humans.

“We have proactively continued to advance our multi-modality protocol, as an extended treatment before extubation, in an attempt to reverse the state of brain death” said Mr.Pranjal Agrawal, CEO Revita Life Sciences. “This treatment approach has yielded some very encouraging initial outcome signs, ranging from minor observations on blood pressure changes with response to painful stimuli, to eye opening and finger movements, with corresponding transient to permanent reversal changes in EEG patterns.”

Continue reading “Revita Life Sciences Continues to Advance Multi-Modality Protocol in Attempt to Revive Brain Dead Subjects” »

Feb 11, 2017

Value Conflicts surrounding the Meaning of Life in the Trans/Post/Human Future

Posted by in categories: biological, cryonics, cyborgs, economics, environmental, ethics, futurism, governance, health, homo sapiens, law, mobile phones, policy, posthumanism, security, theory, transhumanism

Posthumanists and perhaps especially transhumanists tend to downplay the value conflicts that are likely to emerge in the wake of a rapidly changing technoscientific landscape. What follows are six questions and scenarios that are designed to focus thinking by drawing together several tendencies that are not normally related to each other but which nevertheless provide the basis for future value conflicts.

  1. Will ecological thinking eventuate in an instrumentalization of life? Generally speaking, biology – especially when a nervous system is involved — is more energy efficient when it comes to storing, accessing and processing information than even the best silicon-based computers. While we still don’t quite know why this is the case, we are nevertheless acquiring greater powers of ‘informing’ biological processes through strategic interventions, ranging from correcting ‘genetic errors’ to growing purpose-made organs, including neurons, from stem-cells. In that case, might we not ‘grow’ some organs to function in largely the same capacity as silicon-based computers – especially if it helps to reduce the overall burden that human activity places on the planet? (E.g. the brains in the vats in the film The Minority Report which engage in the precognition of crime.) In other words, this new ‘instrumentalization of life’ may be the most environmentally friendly way to prolong our own survival. But is this a good enough reason? Would these specially created organic thought-beings require legal protection or even rights? The environmental movement has been, generally speaking, against the multiplication of artificial life forms (e.g. the controversies surrounding genetically modified organisms), but in this scenario these life forms would potentially provide a means to achieve ecologically friendly goals.

  1. Will concerns for social justice force us to enhance animals? We are becoming more capable of recognizing and decoding animal thoughts and feelings, a fact which has helped to bolster those concerned with animal welfare, not to mention ‘animal rights’. At the same time, we are also developing prosthetic devices (of the sort already worn by Steven Hawking) which can enhance the powers of disabled humans so their thoughts and feelings are can be communicated to a wider audience and hence enable them to participate in society more effectively. Might we not wish to apply similar prosthetics to animals – and perhaps even ourselves — in order to facilitate the transaction of thoughts and feelings between humans and animals? This proposal might aim ultimately to secure some mutually agreeable ‘social contract’, whereby animals are incorporated more explicitly in the human life-world — not as merely wards but as something closer to citizens. (See, e.g., Donaldson and Kymlicka’s Zoopolis.) However, would this set of policy initiatives constitute a violation of the animals’ species integrity and simply be a more insidious form of human domination?

Continue reading “Value Conflicts surrounding the Meaning of Life in the Trans/Post/Human Future” »

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