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Archive for the ‘finance’ category

May 25, 2017

I gave the Co-Closing Keynote speech at San Francisco’s The Battery the other day to ultra high net worth families and their finance managers

Posted by in categories: finance, life extension, transhumanism

My topic was #transhumanism and life extension. I’m hoping they might invest in these fields. Former Keynote speakers of this event include Newt Gingrich, Peter Thiel, Andre Agassi, etc. I’ll share a recording of it when I get one. http://familyofficeassociation.com/

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May 20, 2017

Bitcoin closes in on (US) $2000; Why it matters

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, cryptocurrencies, economics, finance, government

At the beginning of 2016, Bitcoin was fairly steady at $430. Richelle Ross predicted that it would finish the year at $650. She would have been right, if the year had ended in November. During 2016, Bitcoin’s US dollar exchange rose from $433 to $1000. In the past 2 months (March 24~May 20, 2017), Bitcoin has tacked on 114%, rising from $936 to $2000. [continue below image]…

If this were stock in a corporation, I would recommend liquidating or cutting back on holdings. But the value of Bitcoin is not tied to the future earnings or property value of an organization. In this case, supply demand is fueled—in part—by speculation. Yes, of course. But, it is also fueled by a two-sided network built on the growing base of utilitarian adoption. And not just an adoption fad, but adoption that mirrors the shift in our very understanding of bookkeeping, trust and transparency.

Despite problems of growth, governance and regulation, Bitcoin is more clearly taking its place as the future of money. Even if it never becomes “legal tender” in any country—and is used only as a mechanism of payments and settlement, it is still woefully undervalued. $2000 is not an end-game. It is a beginning.

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May 16, 2017

Your art degree might save you from automation, an AI expert says

Posted by in categories: finance, robotics/AI

When machines control all the world’s finances and run factory floors, what will humans be left to do?

We’ll make art, says Kai-Fu Lee, a former Google and Microsoft executive who has since launched VC firm Sinovation Ventures.

“Art and beauty is very hard to replicate with AI. Given AI is more objective, analytical, data driven, maybe it’s time for some of us to switch to the humanities, liberal arts, and beauty,” Lee told Quartz editor-in-chief Kevin Delaney during a live Q&A session. “Maybe professions where it’s hard to find a job might be good to study.”

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May 14, 2017

An American hedge fund is advertising for a £124k job that offers to freeze employees bodies’ when they die

Posted by in categories: finance, law

Hedge fund Numerai looks after its employees even “after their legal death.”

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May 14, 2017

Android Pay adds support for 71 more banks and merchants

Posted by in categories: finance, mobile phones

Android Pay keeps growing its network of supported institutions. The mobile payment system added as many as 71 new places where you can carry out Android Pay transactions. The complete list of new additions is available at the end of the article.

With Android Pay, both your credit card and the institution that services it must be compatible in order for the system to function. Google keeps adding new banks and merchants in order to increase its range of support. Once set up, the system works by simply tapping your phone on a payments terminal at the store. The functionality is also available in Android Wear 2.0 smartwatches.

Recently, Android Pay was updated with PayPal integration, enabling users to pay quickly using their PP balance. The service is available in 13 countries across the world.

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May 12, 2017

Laying the foundations of the European Institute for Neuromorphic Computing

Posted by in categories: computing, finance, habitats, neuroscience

On 5th of May, the cornerstone for the construction of a neuromorphic computing facility in Europe was laid at the University of Heidelberg in Germany. With the financial support of the European Union and German public and private institutions, the new building will house leading European researchers working on neuromorphic computing within the Human Brain Project, a FET Flagship of the European Commission.

With German and EU flags in the background, representatives from the sponsoring authorities are using shovels to throw soil to the ground where the building is going to be constructed.

With this new facility the research team from Heidelberg University, led by Prof. Dr. Karlheinz Meier, will benefit from an optimal environment to continue working on the neuromorphic computing platform, which they are developing together with other research groups within the Human Brain Project.

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May 10, 2017

Analysis predicts extremely disruptive, total transition to EV / autonomous vehicles in 13 years

Posted by in categories: economics, finance, internet, mobile phones, robotics/AI

Yes, this works with the financial profile of “middle class” American families.


(Tech Xplore)—RethinkX, an independent think tank that analyzes and forecasts disruptive technologies, has released an astonishing report predicting a far more rapid transition to EV/autonomous vehicles than experts are currently predicting. The report is based on an analysis of the so-called technology-adoption S-curve that describes the rapid uptake of truly disruptive technologies like smartphones and the internet. Additionally, the report addresses in detail the massive economic implications of this prediction across various sectors, including energy, transportation and manufacturing.

Rethinking Transportation 2020–2030 suggests that within 10 years of regulatory approval, by 2030, 95 percent of U.S. passenger miles traveled will be served by on-demand autonomous electric vehicles (AEVs). The primary driver of this unfathomably huge change in American life is economics: The cost savings of using transport-as-a-service (TaaS) providers will be so great that consumers will abandon individually owned vehicles. The report predicts that the cost of TaaS will save the average family $5600 annually, the equivalent of a 10 percent raise in salary. This, the report suggests, will lead to the biggest increase in consumer spending in history.

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May 3, 2017

Rejuvenation would be too expensive to create

Posted by in categories: asteroid/comet impacts, economics, existential risks, finance, life extension

Creating rejuvenation will probably be quite expensive, but that’s no reason to give up on it. We can pull it off.


The first thing to realise is that, when you wonder how much something will cost, you’re actually wondering how many resources and how many people doing how much work it will take to do that something. That’s all that really matters. The problem is that we have a sucky economic system such that even if we do have more than enough people and resources to do the job, the monetary cost of it could be so high that you can’t get the job done without creating financial problems left and right. This should be a hint that the problem, if it exists, lies in our crappy economic system, not in rejuvenation itself or whatever other thing we may create.

Apart from the obvious fact that other hysterically expensive endeavours (such as space missions) are pulled off despite their costs, we must take into account that desperate circumstances call for desperate measures. We don’t need to tear apart our economic system and replace it with another before we create rejuvenation, and neither would we if faced with another health crisis (such as a pandemic) or a planetary crisis, but we need to get the job done despite its costs and the consequences they may have. We can’t give up on rejuvenation on the grounds that it may be too expensive to create, just like we wouldn’t in the case of an existential risk. Can you imagine that? There’s a huge asteroid on a collision course with Earth, and our only hope is a spectacularly expensive space mission to destroy it before it’s too late. Just who in their right mind would step up and say: ‘Nah, too expensive. Let’s not do it.

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Apr 17, 2017

How AI is transforming the future of fintech

Posted by in categories: finance, robotics/AI

Money 2017 speakers Juergen Schmidhuber, Wirecard’s Joern Leogrande and Nutmeg’s Nick Hungerford discuss the changing face of AI-driven finance.

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Apr 14, 2017

What is ICE 9?

Posted by in categories: finance, military

Ice-nine is a fictitious alternative structure of water that is solid at room temperature. When a crystal of ice-nine contacts liquid water, it becomes a seed crystal that makes the molecules of liquid water arrange themselves into the solid form, ice-nine. Felix Hoenikker’s reason to create this substance was to aid in the military’s plight of wading through mud and swamp areas while fighting. That is, if ice-nine could reduce the wetness of the areas to a solid form, soldiers could easily maneuver across without becoming entrapped or slowed. (Cat’s Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut) Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat%27s_Cradle

Jim Rickards uses ICE 9 in his latest work “The Road to Ruin” to warn investors of a potential ICE 9 event in which the financial system literally freezes up in a domino type event as he describes in a recent interview:

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