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Archive for the ‘science’ category

Oct 16, 2018

Bioquark Inc. — Real Bodies — Ms. Chiara Bordi — HealthQe — QantiQa — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, biological, biotech/medical, cryonics, DNA, futurism, genetics, health, science, transhumanism

Exciting visitor at the Real Bodies (https://www.realbodies.it/) exhibit!

The lovely Ms. Chiara Bordi (https://www.facebook.com/Chiara-Bordi-474572166390000/), Miss Italia 3rd place runner up (aka the “Bionic Beauty”) stopping by to visit our associates at HealthQE (www.healthqe.cloud), and QantiQa (https://www.qantiqa.com/), to test out their new Musyke device

Bio-mechanics and Bio-acoustics

Two critical components in the regeneration, repair, and rejuvenation equation, and part of the integrated age-reversal paradigm of Embrykinesis at Bioquark Inc.- (www.bioquark.com)

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Oct 12, 2018

Invitation to Join Data Science Central

Posted by in categories: business, mathematics, robotics/AI, science

Join the largest community of machine learning (ML), deep learning, AI, data science, business analytics, BI, operations research, mathematical and statistical professionals: Sign up here. If instead, you are only interested in receiving our newsletter, you can subscribe here. There is no cost.

The full membership includes, in addition to the newsletter subscription:

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Oct 9, 2018

Bioquark Inc. — Real Bodies Milano Exhibit — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biotech/medical, cryonics, futurism, genetics, health, life extension, science, transhumanism

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Oct 8, 2018

Brain Meets Machine: The Art and Science of Brain-Computer Interfaces

Posted by in categories: computing, mathematics, neuroscience, science

Current brain-computer interface (BCI) research helps people who have lost the ability to affect their environment in ways many of us take for granted. Future BCIs may go beyond motor function, perhaps aiding with memory recall, decision-making, and other cognitive functions.


Have you ever studied a foreign language and wished you could upload the vocabulary lists directly into your brain so that you could retain them? Would you like to do mental math with the speed and accuracy of a calculator? Do you want a literal photographic memory? Well, these dreams are still the stuff of science fiction, but the brave new world of brain-computer interfaces, or BCI, is well on its way to making technological miracles of this sort a reality.

The story of BCI begins with the discovery of electrical signals emitted by the brain. In 1924, German scientist Hans Berger recorded the first electroencephalogram, or EEG, by placing electrodes under a person’s scalp. Although his research was at first met with derision, a whole new way to study the brain was born from his work. It is now well accepted that the human brain emits electric signals at a variety of frequencies currently known as brainwaves.

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Sep 30, 2018

‘Journalologists’ use scientific methods to study academic publishing. Is their work improving science?

Posted by in category: science

Publication science is struggling to keep up. “Research in this area is not fast-moving,” says Sara Schroter, a senior researcher at The BMJ. In a recent Nature opinion piece, Rennie called for rigorous studies to demonstrate the pros and cons of many new developments, including open peer review and preprints. In JAMA, he and Executive Managing Editor Annette Flanagin lamented that few people are studying “important issues and threats to the scientific enterprise, such as reproducibility, fake peer review, and predatory journals.”


Decades spent studying peer review, publication bias, and more have challenged the status quo, but journalologists say they have a long way to go.

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Sep 27, 2018

Illuminating Science

Posted by in categories: biological, computing, physics, science

Illuminating mathematics, physics, biology and computer science research through public service journalism.

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Sep 26, 2018

Imagine Science Films Festival New York

Posted by in categories: existential risks, life extension, media & arts, science

The Imagine Science Films Festival is happening on October 12-19th, 2018 in New York, at a variety of venues, and this year, it is featuring a theme close to home: survival.

Crisis. Entropy. Extinction. This year we look at the high stakes for all life on Earth and beyond. Between nuclear proliferation, species loss and dwindling resources, existence itself is not assured. But for every dystopia, a corresponding utopia may be within reach. It may be a struggle, but the record of all life is that of an eon-spanning fight to stay alive. We’ll feature tumultuous natural history and startling feats of adaptation. Apoptosis versus immortal cell lines. Half-lives and radical life extension. The deaths of stars and extraordinary paths to SURVIVAL.

With this year’s theme including life extension, we may well see some interesting and thought-provoking films on the topic. Lifespan.io is also an official event sponsor for the festival, as we strongly feel that the worlds of filmmaking and science can be a perfect match in helping to encourage a wider dialogue about aging and doing something about it.

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Sep 25, 2018

Bioquark Inc. — Reader’s Digest (15 Cool Future Jobs) — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biotech/medical, DNA, futurism, genetics, health, life extension, posthumanism, science

Sep 22, 2018

Japan launches robotic cargo spaceship to space station with supplies and science

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, science, space, transportation

News Brief: The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency today launched a robotic cargo ship to the International Space Station, filled with more than five tons of supplies, equipment and experiments. Liftoff of Japan’s H-IIB rocket from the Tanegashima Space Center came at 2:52 a.m. JST Sept. 23 (10:52 a.m. PT Sept. 22). Minutes later, the HTV-7 cargo carrier (also known as Kounotori-7) separated from the rocket, heading for a Thursday rendezvous with the space station. Among the cylindrical craft’s payloads are new hardware to upgrade the station’s electrical power system, an experiment to study protein crystal growth at low temperatures, a life-sciences glovebox and an experimental sample return capsule.

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Sep 22, 2018

Philanthropy Assignment: Inspire Tomorrow’s Leaders With Science

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, business, education, engineering, mathematics, science

In a world increasingly driven by industries that rely on advanced technical learning and innovation, fluency in STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and math) becomes more vital every day. Yet our education system isn’t keeping up. Five years ago, a Business-Higher Education Forum study found that 80% of high school students either lacked interest or proficiency in STEM subjects. Meanwhile, a college and career readiness organization known as ACT reported last year that the number of students pursuing STEM careers is growing at less than 1% annually.

The Amgen Foundation is doing something about it. As the principal philanthropic arm of Amgen, the largest independent biotechnology company, the Amgen Foundation has been committed to inspiring the next generation of scientists and innovators by making immersive science education a focus of its social investments for almost 30 years. While Amgen has reached millions of patients around the world with biotechnology medicines to combat serious illnesses, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer and migraines, the Amgen Foundation has reached more than 4 million students globally—and it is poised to launch a new program called LabXchange with the potential to reach millions more.

“As a scientist, it’s clear to me that the most effective way to learn science is by doing it,” says David Reese, executive vice president of Research and Development at Amgen and member of the Amgen Foundation board of directors. “It’s time to transform the science learning experience. We need to move from information acquisition to application and exploration, from students as passive listeners to active participants in the learning process, from teachers as knowledge transmitters to facilitators and coaches.”

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