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Archive for the ‘wearables’ category

Aug 17, 2019

Artificial throat could someday help mute people ‘speak’

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, wearables

Most people take speech for granted, but it’s actually a complex process that involves both motions of the mouth and vibrations of folded tissues, called vocal cords, within the throat. If the vocal cords sustain injuries or other lesions, a person can lose the ability to speak. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed a wearable artificial throat that, when attached to the neck like a temporary tattoo, can transform throat movements into sounds.

Scientists have developed detectors that measure movements on human skin, such as pulse or heartbeat. However, the devices typically can’t convert these motions into sounds. Recently, He Tian, Yi Yang, Tian-Ling Ren and colleagues developed a prototype artificial throat with both capabilities, but because the device needed to be taped to the skin, it wasn’t comfortable enough to wear for long periods of time. So the researchers wanted to develop a thinner, skin-like artificial throat that would adhere to the neck like a temporary tattoo.

To make their artificial throat, the researchers laser-scribed graphene on a thin sheet of polyvinyl alcohol film. The flexible device measured 0.6 by 1.2 inches, or about double the size of a person’s thumbnail. The researchers used water to attach the film to the skin over a volunteer’s throat and connected it with electrodes to a small armband that contained a circuit board, microcomputer, power amplifier and decoder. When the volunteer noiselessly imitated the throat motions of speech, the instrument converted these movements into emitted sounds, such as the words “OK” and “No.” The researchers say that, in the future, mute people could be trained to generate signals with their throats that the device would translate into speech.

Jul 31, 2019

Soft wearable health monitor uses stretchable electronics

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, engineering, health, mobile phones, wearables

A wireless, wearable monitor built with stretchable electronics could allow comfortable, long-term health monitoring of adults, babies and small children without concern for skin injury or allergic reactions caused by conventional adhesive sensors with conductive gels.

The soft and conformable monitor can broadcast electrocardiogram (ECG), heart rate, respiratory rate and motion activity data as much as 15 meters to a portable recording device such as a smartphone or tablet computer. The electronics are mounted on a stretchable substrate and connected to gold, -like electrodes through printed connectors that can stretch with the medical film in which they are embedded.

“This health monitor has a key advantage for young children who are always moving, since the soft conformal device can accommodate that activity with a gentle integration onto the skin,” said Woon-Hong Yeo, an assistant professor in the George Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering and Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. “This is designed to meet the electronic health monitoring needs of people whose sensitive skin may be harmed by conventional monitors.”

Jul 29, 2019

Sony is crowdfunding a wearable ‘air conditioner’ (updated)

Posted by in category: wearables

The Reon Pocket can cool you down and heat you up while remaining unnoticed.

Jul 3, 2019

The Band-Aid of the future knows when you’re healed

Posted by in categories: futurism, wearables

It’s easy to imagine these wearable circuits on the shelves of CVS.

3 minute Read.

Jun 21, 2019

New e-tattoo enables accurate, uninterrupted heart monitoring for days

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health, wearables

The future of medicine is not fixing what is broken, it’s preventing things from getting broken in the first place.


The leading cause of death in Texas is heart disease, according to the National Center for Health Statistics, accounting for more than 45,000 deaths statewide in 2017. A new wearable technology made from stretchy, lightweight material could make heart health monitoring easier and more accurate than existing electrocardiograph machines—a technology that has changed little in almost a century.

Developed by engineers at The University of Texas at Austin and led by Nanshu Lu in the Cockrell School of Engineering, this is the latest incarnation of Lu’s electronic tattoo technology, a graphene-based that can be placed on the skin to measure a variety of body responses, from electrical to biomechanical signals.

Continue reading “New e-tattoo enables accurate, uninterrupted heart monitoring for days” »

Jun 10, 2019

The Emerging World of Touchless Biosensors

Posted by in categories: electronics, wearables

Biosensors can also be sprayed.


A new touchless world of biosensing is emerging, and its implications are unequivocal. What does this mean for wearables, telehealth, and research?

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Jun 10, 2019

The 3D ‘microbatteries’ that could power ultra-low energy wearables

Posted by in categories: energy, wearables

Image a battery that can be charged in seconds.

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Jun 2, 2019

Flexible generators turn movement into energy

Posted by in categories: energy, wearables

Wearable devices that harvest energy from movement are not a new idea, but a material created at Rice University may make them more practical.

The Rice lab of chemist James Tour has adapted laser-induced graphene (LIG) into small, metal-free devices that generate electricity. Like rubbing a balloon on hair, putting LIG composites in contact with other surfaces produces that can be used to .

Continue reading “Flexible generators turn movement into energy” »

May 23, 2019

Amazon is reportedly working on an Alexa-powered wearable that reads human emotions

Posted by in categories: health, wearables

Amazon is reportedly developing a voice-activated wearable device that can recognize human emotions.

If successful, the health product could help the company improve its targeted advertisements and make better product recommendations, reports Bloomberg. The unnamed device could also advise humans on how to better interact with others.

A source showed Bloomberg internal Amazon documents that revealed a few details about the futuristic health and wellness product.

Continue reading “Amazon is reportedly working on an Alexa-powered wearable that reads human emotions” »

May 23, 2019

DARPA Funds Ambitious Brain-Machine Interface Program

Posted by in categories: neuroscience, wearables

The N3 program aims to develop wearable devices that let soldiers to communicate directly with machines.

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