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Archive for the ‘wearables’ category

May 11, 2017

3D Printing the Way to Bionic Humans

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical, cyborgs, health, transhumanism, wearables

A pressure sensor printed directly on a hand is a step toward new biomedical devices, “on the fly” wearable technology, and more…


(Inside Science) — Wearable technology may soon be at your fingertips — literally. Researchers have developed a pressure sensor that can be 3D printed directly on your hand. The device, sensitive enough to feel a beating pulse, is made from soft, stretchy silicone that conforms to the curves of your fingertip.

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May 10, 2017

Precision typing on a smartwatch with finger gestures

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, media & arts, mobile phones, virtual reality, wearables

The “Watchsense” prototype uses a small depth camera attached to the arm, mimicking a depth camera on a smartwatch. It could make it easy to type, or in a music program, volume could be increased by simply raising a finger. (credit: Srinath Sridhar et al.)

If you wear a smartwatch, you know how limiting it is to type it on or otherwise operate it. Now European researchers have developed an input method that uses a depth camera (similar to the Kinect game controller) to track fingertip touch and location on the back of the hand or in mid-air, allowing for precision control.

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May 6, 2017

Kurzweil: By 2030, Nanobots Will Flow Throughout Our Bodies

Posted by in categories: biological, nanotechnology, neuroscience, Ray Kurzweil, wearables

Another futurist, Dave Evans, founder and CTO of Silicon Valley stealth startup Stringify, gave his thoughts about Kurzweil’s nanobot idea in an interview with James Bedsole on February.

Evans explained that he thinks such a merging of technology and biology isn’t at all farfetched. In fact, he described three stages as to how this will occur: the wearable phase (where we are today), the embeddable phase (where we’re headed, with neural implants and such), and the replaceable phase.

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Apr 13, 2017

Toyota shows robotic leg brace to help paralyzed people walk

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, robotics/AI, wearables

Toyota is introducing a wearable robotic leg brace designed to help partially paralyzed people walk.

The Welwalk WW-1000 system is made up of a motorized mechanical frame that fits on a person’s leg from the knee down. The patients can practice walking wearing the robotic device on a special treadmill that can support their weight.

Toyota Motor Corp. demonstrated the equipment for reporters at its Tokyo headquarters on Wednesday.

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Apr 8, 2017

A temporary tattoo that brings hospital care to the home

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, habitats, health, wearables

What if doctors could monitor patients at home with the same degree of accuracy they’d get during a stay at the hospital? Bioelectronics innovator Todd Coleman shares his quest to develop wearable, flexible electronic health monitoring patches that promise to revolutionize healthcare and make medicine less invasive.

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Mar 31, 2017

Google and Levi’s Are Releasing the World’s First ‘Smart Jacket’ This Year

Posted by in category: wearables

With the exception of activity trackers and smartwatches, it’s fair to say that wearable technology hasn’t really taken off just yet, but if Google and Levi’s have their way, that could soon be about to change.

The two companies are teaming up to release their first co-designed product – the world’s first ‘smart’ trucker jacket (yep, that’s a thing now). It looks for the most part like a regular Levi’s Commuter jacket, but with a conductive fabric called “interactive denim” and a Bluetooth device that attaches to the sleeve.

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Mar 20, 2017

Why Mary Lou Jepsen Left Facebook: To Transform Health Care and Invent Consumer Telepathy

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health, mathematics, neuroscience, wearables

“Yep, transforming health care and telepathy, those are the items on her to-do list. Jepsen plans to achieve both goals with a cheap wearable device that her engineers are now tinkering with in the lab. And then there’s the side benefit of reinvigorating the tired consumer electronics industry, which Jepsen thinks is due for the next big thing.

Jepsen was at SXSW to give a talk about Openwater, her new startup. While the company is still conducting R&D to decide on its first products, Jepsen feels the need to speak out now about what she’s building and how she thinks her technology could radically change society. She wants to give people fair warning and time to think about what’s coming. “I know it seems outlandish to be talking about telepathy, but it’s completely solid physics and mathematical principles—it’s in reach in the next three years,” she says.

Plus, she’s sick of stealth mode. “I haven’t been able to to talk about what I’ve been doing for five and half years while I was at Google and Facebook, and I don’t think secrecy is useful,” she says. She left Facebook in August, and in September she filed patents for her Openwater technology, which she expects to be issued any day now.

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Feb 16, 2017

Material can turn sunlight, heat and movement into electricity—all at once

Posted by in categories: privacy, solar power, sustainability, wearables

Many forms of energy surround you: sunlight, the heat in your room and even your own movements. All that energy—normally wasted—can potentially help power your portable and wearable gadgets, from biometric sensors to smart watches. Now, researchers from the University of Oulu in Finland have found that a mineral with the perovskite crystal structure has the right properties to extract energy from multiple sources at the same time.

Perovskites are a family of minerals, many of which have shown promise for harvesting one or two types of at a time—but not simultaneously. One family member may be good for solar cells, with the right properties for efficiently converting solar energy into electricity. Meanwhile, another is adept at harnessing energy from changes in temperature and pressure, which can arise from motion, making them so-called pyroelectric and piezoelectric materials, respectively.

Sometimes, however, just one type of energy isn’t enough. A given form of energy isn’t always available—maybe it’s cloudy or you’re in a meeting and can’t get up to move around. Other researchers have developed devices that can harness multiple forms of energy, but they require multiple materials, adding bulk to what’s supposed to be a small and portable device.

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Feb 15, 2017

#LiDARWearable

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, transportation, wearables

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Feb 14, 2017

To Get AI in Everyday Gadgets, Engineers Go to Specialized Hardware

Posted by in categories: mobile phones, robotics/AI, wearables

Energy-efficient, deep-learning processors are what’s needed to make smart phones, wearables, and other consumer electronics smarter.

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