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Archive for the ‘climatology’ category

Jan 9, 2018

A Fully Solar-Powered Car May Be Hitting The Road by 2019

Posted by in categories: climatology, sustainability

Lightyear One, a car whose ability to use solar power has been thought of as an impossible feat, just won a Climate Change Innovator Award.

Designed by the Dutch startup Lightyear, the “car that charges itself” can supposedly drive for months without charging and has a 400–800 km range. But is a solar-powered car feasible?

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Jan 5, 2018

Oxygen disappearing from world’s oceans, including Canada’s

Posted by in categories: climatology, sustainability

All animals need to breathe oxygen and we know that regions of the ocean that are losing oxygen are becoming more and more common. We’re seeing the marine animals leaving those areas.


Almost two dozen marine scientists from around the world have issued a warning about an often-overlooked side effect of climate change and pollution.

In a paper published this week in Science, they say oxygen is disappearing from increasingly large areas of ocean and threatening marine life.

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Dec 24, 2017

Arecibo Radio Telescope Snaps Photos Of 3200 Phaethon, Reveals New Information On Near-Earth Asteroid

Posted by in categories: climatology, government, space

Despite being battered by Hurricane Maria, and facing a decrease in funding from the U.S. government, the Arecibo radio telescope in Puerto Rico is still going strong, and is now up and running again, following a series of repairs. And with the near-Earth asteroid 3200 Phaethon having just flown by our planet, Arecibo has just sent back images that are supposed to represent the highest-resolution photos of the asteroid, which help reveal some important details about the object.

According to a press release from NASA, the radar images were taken by the Arecibo Observatory Planet Radar last Saturday, December 16, and generated the day after, as asteroid Phaethon 3200 had its close encounter with Earth. At the time of its closest approach, the object was only 1.1 million miles away from Earth, or less than five times the distance separating our planet from the moon. The images have resolutions estimated at about 250 feet per pixel, making them the best-quality photos of the asteroid that are currently available, Phys.org added.

Based on Arecibo’s radar images, scientists believe that 3200 Phaethon is substantially larger than once estimated, with a diameter of approximately 3.6 miles, or 0.6 miles larger than what previous studies had suggested. That also makes Phaethon the second largest near-Earth object classified as a “potentially hazardous asteroid,” or a comparatively large asteroid that orbits much closer to Earth than most others do. The images also suggest Phaethon has a spheroidal shape, with a number of peculiar physical features that scientists are still trying to understand in full. These features include a concave area believed to be several hundred meters wide, and a dark, crater-like area located near one of its poles.

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Dec 22, 2017

SPEX Instrument Maiden Flight Aboard NASA ER-2

Posted by in categories: climatology, particle physics, sustainability

Climate Change Research: our team came up with this concept — https://www.behance.net/gallery/59176073/Climate-Change This team tested an instrument that gathers key data about aerosols—small, solid or liquid particles suspended in the Earth’s atmosphere—to better to assess their effects on weather, climate and air quality.


We recently put an instrument to the test that gathers key data about aerosols—small, solid or liquid particles suspended in the Earth’s atmosphere—to better to assess their effects on weather, climate and air quality. See what happened: http://go.nasa.gov/2BfdJdL

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Dec 2, 2017

Aging Expert: The First Person to Live to 1,000 Has Already Been Born

Posted by in categories: biological, climatology, life extension, sustainability

SENS Research Foundation co-founder Aubrey de Grey believes in a world in which we no longer age. At a London event, he explained that he believes the first person who will live to be 1,000 has already been born, and we’ll solve this “aging problem” within 20 years.

Aging has plagued biological organisms since life first began on planet Earth and it’s an accepted and universally understood part of life. Sure, things like climate change pose significant threats to society, but aging will almost certainly still exist even if we ever manage to stop damaging our environment.

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Nov 15, 2017

A New Futuristic Robot Lets Your Arms Lift Half a Ton

Posted by in categories: biological, climatology, cyborgs, Elon Musk, robotics/AI, space travel, sustainability

Have you ever lifted half a ton? With the Guardian GT, a set of robotic arms, you could do so with as little as two kilogram (five pounds) of force, allowing you to have superhuman strength.

Elon Musk recently made headlines asserting that, in order for us to both progress and survive as a species, we must merge with machines and become cyborgs. And, as climate change rages onwards and the biological difficulties of completing a human mission to Mars become ever more apparent, many are beginning to agree.

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Nov 8, 2017

U.S. officials are having a ‘Sputnik moment’ over AI innovation in China

Posted by in categories: climatology, economics, policy, quantum physics, robotics/AI, security, sustainability

Today’s Sputnik moment is China’s rapid growth as an economic and technological superpower. In 2017 alone, China has outpaced the United States in renewable energy efforts and has become the standard-bearer in combating climate change and advocacy for globalization. Similarly, China is rapidly moving towards taking the lead in technology from the United States and is looking at quantum computing and artificial intelligence as areas for growth to do so.

The Verge recently published an article citing Alphabet chief executive officer Eric Schmidt’s perspective that the United States is falling behind when it comes to research and development in artificial intelligence, particularly compared to the rapid pace of innovation that China has set in the field. Schmidt, who is also the chair of the Defense Innovation Advisory Board, gave those remarks as part of a discussion at The Artificial Intelligence and Global Security Summit held by The Center for a New American Security (CNAS), a nonprofit think tank dedicated to research and analysis on how the United States can make informed policy-making decisions on national security and defense.

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Oct 31, 2017

The carbon catchers of Climeworks

Posted by in categories: climatology, engineering, environmental, solar power, space, sustainability

I was thinking about this thing, and the one in Iceland. Maybe we could build giant blimps in the atmosphere of Venus, it would carry that machine on its belly, and on the back of the blimp super advanced solar panels. Then inside of the blimp the CO2 could be mixed into liquid crystals or something like that and be dropped like rain down on the surface, to eventually terraform it.


Global Engineering — a phrase that describes steadying the world’s climate with technical solutions. A Swiss company has received EU funding to develop a machine that captures CO2. Can it really make a difference?

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Oct 28, 2017

Seawater desalination will quench the thirst of a parched planet

Posted by in categories: climatology, sustainability

Humanity has sought to make the Earth’s oceans potable for thousands of years. The Norse tale of Utgarda-Loki tells of Odin being tricked into drinking from a horn connected to the sea, while Exodus 15:22–26 of the Bible likely describes Moses desalinating the water of Marah:

When they came to Marah, they could not drink the water of Marah because it was bitter; therefore it was named Marah. And the people grumbled against Moses, saying, “What shall we drink?” And he cried to the Lord, and the Lord showed him a log, and he threw it into the water, and the water became sweet.

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Oct 23, 2017

Sucking CO2 from the atmosphere could save the planet — but it isn’t cheap

Posted by in categories: business, climatology, environmental, geoengineering, space, sustainability

Should definitely be worked on. Eventually the same stuff could be used to reverse engineer/terraform Venus.


When politicians talk about the Paris Climate Agreement, it’s usually framed in terms of restrictions on emissions for states and businesses. But the Paris Agreement wasn’t just an agreement to regulate — it was also an agreement to innovate. That’s because most experts agree that the world won’t be able to keep global temperature rise below 2 degrees Celsius, unless there’s a way to physically remove CO2 from the atmosphere.

A Swiss startup called Climeworks has made that their goal, developing the most advanced carbon-capture technology to date. VICE News went to Switzerland to see how the technology works and hear how the business plans to tackle climate change. Problem is, what Climeworks is doing isn’t cheap.

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