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Archive for the ‘climatology’ category

Jul 15, 2019

Coal Ash in the Water

Posted by in category: climatology

There’s no way to store toxic coal waste that’s completely safe. There’s also no way to mine and burn coal that doesn’t threaten communities, our waterways and our climate. Duke needs to stop burning coal, clean up its toxic mess, and invest in abundant, affordable clean energy sources like solar and wind. #2048istoolate #BeyondCoal #YEARSproject with Sierra Club.

Jul 13, 2019

How Bacteria Could Generate Radio waves

Posted by in categories: climatology, computing, mobile phones, space

I call them “BATS”.


Can bacteria generate radio waves?

On the face of it, this seems an unlikely proposition. Natural sources of radio waves include lightning, stars and pulsars while artificial sources include radar, mobile phones and computers. This is a diverse list. So it’s hard to see what these things might have in common with bacteria that could be responsible for making radio waves.

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Jul 13, 2019

One Climate Crisis Disaster Occurs Every Week, U.N. Official Warns

Posted by in category: climatology

Governments should prioritize ‘adaptation and resilience’ measures designed to curb the effects of ongoing lower-impact climate events, experts say.

Jul 13, 2019

New study: How much do climate fluctuations matter for global crop yields?

Posted by in categories: climatology, policy

The El Niño-Southern Oscillation has been responsible for widespread, simultaneous crop failures in recent history, according to a new study from researchers at Columbia University’s International Research Institute for Climate and Society, the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) and other partners. This finding runs counter to a central pillar of the global agriculture system, which assumes that crop failures in geographically distant breadbasket regions such as the United States, China and Argentina are unrelated. The results also underscore the potential opportunity to manage such climate risks, which can be predicted using seasonal climate forecasts.

The study, published in Science Advances, is the first to provide estimates of the degree to which different modes of such as ENSO cause volatility in global and regional production of corn, wheat and soy. Such variability caused nearly 18 percent volatility in global corn production from 1980 to 2010, for example.

“Global agriculture counts on the strong likelihood that poor production in one part of the world will be made up for by good production elsewhere,” said Weston Anderson, a postdoctoral research scientist at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society and lead author on the study.

Jul 12, 2019

What happens when you can see disaster unfolding, and nobody listens?

Posted by in category: climatology

The distinct burden of being a climate scientist.

Jul 11, 2019

Massive reforestation is key to averting a climate catastrophe

Posted by in categories: climatology, sustainability

The study also suggests that reforesting such a large area wouldn’t impact our capacity for growing and farming food.

Jul 11, 2019

Blockchain and carbon offsetting can help cities reduce emissions – but sometimes simpler is best

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, business, climatology, government

Carbon offsetting initiatives have been offered by private companies – including British Airways and Shell – for many years. These voluntary schemes give customers the choice to pay a premium, on the understanding that the company will offset some greenhouse gas emissions. Since carbon offsetting became an option, projects around the world have resulted in a saving of approximately 994m tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO₂) equivalent. But given that global CO₂ levels in 2018 were 33.1Gt, it’s fair to say that a lot more could be done.

The UK could become net zero emissions tomorrow if the government wished, but it would cost the tax payer dearly. In 2017, the UK’s total greenhouse gas emissions were 460m tonnes. If, for example, the government used the Gold Standard offsetting scheme, at an average cost of £10/tonne, that would amount to an astonishing £4.6 billion bill. Most would agree this would be an excessive cost for the government to bear, and anyway the public, private and third sectors should share responsibility for tackling emissions.

Local authorities have an important role to play in meeting this target, given their ability to work with residents, charities and businesses to make meaningful changes at a local level. Some local authorities are leading the way by setting ambitious targets: Liverpool City Council aims to become the UK’s first “climate positive” city by the end of 2020. The council has formed a partnership with a private sector organisation – the Poseidon Foundation – to achieve this through carbon offsetting.

Jul 9, 2019

Climate Facts

Posted by in category: climatology

Research on oceans.

Jul 9, 2019

Taking the Climate for Granted

Posted by in categories: climatology, health

It’s shocking that climate affects our health.

Jul 8, 2019

Climate Facts: Bridge to Nowhere

Posted by in category: climatology

Report that natural gas is just as bad as coal due to rampant methane leaks which cause global heating.

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