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Archive for the ‘life extension’ category

Nov 15, 2018

Genes linked to being gay may help straight people get more sex

Posted by in categories: genetics, life extension, sex

The largest-ever study of genetics and sexual orientation offers a theory about the longevity of genes that influence homosexuality.

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Nov 15, 2018

Thoughts on the 2018 Eurosymposium on Healthy Ageing

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, life extension, media & arts

Thoughts on the Eurosymposium on Healthy Ageing held by Heales in Brussels.


When I first learned about the possibility of achieving human rejuvenation through biotechnological means, little did I know that this would lead me to meet many of the central figures in the field during a conference some seven years later—let alone that I would be speaking at the very same event. Yet, I’ve had the privilege to attend the Fourth Eurosymposium on Healthy Ageing (EHA) held in Brussels on November 8–10, an experience that gave me a feel of just how real the prospect of human rejuvenation is.

A friendly, welcoming environment

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Nov 15, 2018

Too much mTOR is Linked to Diabetes and Aging

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

A new study takes a look at the relationship between metabolism, aging, and type 2 diabetes and in particular the mTORC1 protein complex, part of the mTOR pathway.

The mTOR pathway

The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a major part of metabolism and is one of four major pathways that control it; collectively, the four pathways are part of deregulated nutrient sensing, which is one of the aging processes.

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Nov 14, 2018

Bio-tech firm develops 3D printed replacement cornea for human eyes

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioprinting, biotech/medical, business, life extension

After successfully transplanting the first 3D-printed cornea in an animal, North Carolina company Precise Bio has recently announced the launch of a dedicated business for creating marketable, 3D-printed products for human eyes. Founded by scientists from the Wake Forest Institute of Regenerative Medicine, this company is developing bio-fabrication printers that can restore cells, tissues, and organs. Their proprietary technology, a 4D bio-printing platform, is said to resolve existing limitations presented by other bioprinters to enable more complex tissues to be engineered for transplants and treatments. By focusing on developing marketable products for the eye, the company aims to achieve rapid advancement in its field and move to overhaul the whole organ transplant system.

When a cornea is damaged by disease or injury, a replacement is often needed to restore vision. Transplant surgery using donated corneas is an available solution, however, it relies on a deceased donor. While the waiting list in the United States is nearly non-existent, other countries require longer wait times, some over a year, before one is available. The Eye Bank Association of America estimates that around 10 million people suffer from corneal blindness that could potentially be restored via transplant surgery. An artificially manufactured cornea would overcome supply limitations while also contributing to the knowledge base to develop more complex organs such as hearts and livers.

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Nov 14, 2018

Immunity connects gut bacteria and aging

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

EPFL scientists have discovered how a dysfunction in the immune system can cause an overload of a gut bacterium. The bacterium produces excess lactic acid, which in turn triggers the production of reactive oxygen species that cause damage to cells and many age-related pathologies.

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Nov 14, 2018

Calorie Restriction Slows Age-related Leaky Gut

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

Researchers from the Kapahi Lab at the Buck Institute for Research on Aging have shown in a new study that increased intestinal permeability is caused by the age-related loss of epithelial cells that form the gut membrane [1].

As we age, the integrity of the gut membrane declines, and it becomes more permeable; this is known as “leaky gut” and is thought to contribute to the background of low-grade chronic inflammation known as inflammaging [2]. One emerging theory is that loss of gut membrane integrity is the origin of inflammaging, the place where age-related chronic inflammation begins. Inflammaging precedes many age-related diseases, including atherosclerosis, arthritis, hypertension, and cancer [3–5].

The new study suggests that caloric restriction, or caloric restriction mimetics, may help to prevent the increase of gut permeability in humans and has the potential to increase healthspan, which is the period of life we spend free from illness.

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Nov 14, 2018

An Interview With Leonid Gavrilov And Natalia Gavrilova

Posted by in categories: biological, life extension

An interview with Drs. Leonid Gavrilov and Natalia Gavrilova on the demography of life extension.


Many people are concerned that vastly extended healthy lifespan might lead us to catastrophic overpopulation, and the best way to mitigate this fear is probably to talk to an experienced demographer. To learn more about this and other interesting questions related to life extension, we spoke to Drs. Leonid Gavrilov and Natalia Gavrilova, respectively Principal Investigator and Research Associate at the Center on Aging in Chicago University. Both of them have specialized in the biodemography of aging and longevity and possess nearly endless resumes.

Natalia and Leonid, your field of expertise is the biodemography of aging and longevity. What drew you to this field of research?

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Nov 13, 2018

When Silicon Valley gets religion — and vice versa

Posted by in categories: life extension, Ray Kurzweil, transhumanism

Some of the tech world’s brightest luminaries hope to postpone the unpleasantness of death, or avoid it entirely. Calico, a secretive company founded by Google, is looking for ways to lengthen human lifespans. Billionaires Larry Ellison, Peter Thiel, and Jeff Bezos have all contributed huge sums for research into anti-aging treatments. Ray Kurzweil, one of the tech industry’s leading futurists, has described three scientific and technological “bridges” that might lead to radically longer life.


Devotees of many religions believe in a soul that lives forever. In transhumanism, techies have found their own version of eternal life — and it’s finding unlikely fans.

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Nov 11, 2018

Albert Camus and the Absurd — Life Extension and the Big Picture

Posted by in categories: existential risks, futurism, health, life extension, philosophy

This paper explores Albert Camus’s notions of the absurd in The Myth of Sisyphus and draws correlations with the movement for indefinite life extension and the big picture of existence.

Calorie vacuums playing in the mud, isn’t that what we are when it comes down to it? We guess our way through much of life, trying not to spend too much time thinking about how trivial it all may or may not be so as to see about keeping the levels of despair down, waiting for our turn on the chopping block… We try to make sense of this life but in the end, can never fully convince ourselves that we have because we never fully do. That challenge is a mountain whose top hasn’t been seen yet.

People are drawn to understand what the most sensible things to do with life are, or as Albert Camus writes “the meaning of life is the most urgent of questions”. It’s a ballpark question. People thirst to make sense of their being, to understand what’s going on, for meaning, to track down and engage the most profound implication. Is thirst proof that water exists, as Gaston Bachelard says? Even rocks mean profound things, and we are self-aware supercomputers in a space filled with variables and has no known walls. It is very improbable that there is not a fundamentally profound implication within such circumstances.

How might we ever make sense of our existence? Masses of people are desperate with this “hope of another life one must ‘deserve’” and often take an irrational “leap”, as Camus says, to “some great idea that will transcend it, refine it, give it a meaning, and betray it.” Many rest on the hope that they’ll land a job they really love and can shine in someday but don’t put serious effort into figuring out what that would specifically be let alone work to make it happen.

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Nov 9, 2018

Plasma NAD+ Levels Decline Significantly with Age

Posted by in category: life extension

Today, we want to highlight a recent, small-scale study looking at NAD+ and how it declines with age in the plasma.

The researchers looked at various NAD+ metabolites across age groups and found that the amounts of some of them, particularly NAD+ itself, are significantly smaller in older people than younger ones [1]. This is likely due to an age-related imbalance between the cellular machinery that consumes NAD+ and the machinery that produces it, and this imbalance leads to the lower levels observed. However, it remains unclear if the resulting decline of NAD+ is due to an increase in consumption or a decrease of production.

Other factors may also serve to reduce the amount of NAD+ in plasma, such as inflammatory signaling molecules and oxidative damage to the NAD+ molecules. The researchers also discuss the role of CD38, a major reason why NAD+ declines as we get older and how inhibiting it may be a potential way to boost NAD+.

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