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Archive for the ‘electronics’ category

Jul 26, 2017

Scientists create colour-changing electronic SKIN

Posted by in categories: electronics, materials

Researchers from Tsinghua University in Beijing have now developed a new type of electronic skin, with a colour change easily seen at just 0–10 per cent strain.

The material is made from graphene — a form of pure carbon that is 200 times stronger than steel.

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Jul 17, 2017

Breathable electronic skin patch developed for continuous long-term use

Posted by in categories: electronics, health

Scientists have developed an electronic sensor that is hypoallergenic, breathable and can be worn constantly for a week, enabling continuous, unobtrusive health monitoring.

The patch, developed by scientists at the University of Tokyo, is, according to its creators, so thin and light that the majority of users will forget they are even wearing it – a far cry from many of the weighty or uncomfortable health monitoring solutions currently available.

Designed to withstand repeated and continuous bending and stretching, the patch can be worn during a host of day-to-day activities, including sports. As a result its creators believe it could be used not only in healthcare settings, but also to monitor professional athletes.

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Jul 14, 2017

Click Here for Happiness

Posted by in categories: biological, bionic, computing, electronics, entertainment, fun, internet, media & arts, mobile phones

Technology can be wonderful. But how do you keep track of yourself when technology allows you to be everywhere at once?

In this film Prof. Yair Amichai-Hamburger (director of the Research Center for Internet Psychology at the Sammy Ofer School of Communications) argues that even though technology allows us to reach out and connect more easily than ever before, if we don’t ever take a step back, we can lose track of our humanity in the process.

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Jul 5, 2017

This Camera Technology Doesn’t Have a Lens at All

Posted by in category: electronics

Engineers have developed a type of camera that doesn’t require any lenses. They’re replacing curved glass with something that does the same job computationally – an ultra-thin optical phased array.

Researchers hope that the findings could turn a wide range of flat surfaces into image collectors.

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Jun 27, 2017

Ultra-Thin Camera Creates Images Without Lenses

Posted by in category: electronics

Engineers have built a camera that does not need lenses to focus light.

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Jun 15, 2017

What is a Drone? (Future A to Z)

Posted by in categories: automation, computing, drones, electronics, military, nuclear weapons, robotics/AI

Drones. Drone is a word you see pretty often in today’s pop culture. But drones seem to be an extremely diverse species. Even flightless vehicles are occasionally referred to as drones. So what exactly is a drone?

In this video series, the Galactic Public Archives takes bite-sized looks at a variety of terms, technologies, and ideas that are likely to be prominent in the future. Terms are regularly changing and being redefined with the passing of time. With constant breakthroughs and the development of new technology and other resources, we seek to define what these things are and how they will impact our future.

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Jun 5, 2017

IBM’s new 5nm architecture crams 30 billion transistors onto fingernail-sized chip

Posted by in categories: computing, electronics

The smallest and most advanced chips currently commercially available are made up of transistors with gates about 10 nm long, but IBM has now unveiled plans to cut them in half. To create 5 nm chips, the company is ditching the standard FinFET architecture in favor of a new structure built with a stack of four nanosheets, allowing some 30 billion transistors to be packed onto a chip the size of a fingernail and promising significant gains in power and efficiency.

First coined in the 1970s, Moore’s Law was the observation that the number of transistors on a single chip would double every two years. The trend has held up pretty well ever since, but the time frame of the doubling has slowed down a little in recent years. In consumer electronics, 14 nm chips are still stock-standard, but advances from the likes of Intel and Samsung mean that 10 nm versions have started hitting the high-end market.

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May 27, 2017

Check what’s behind your wall before drilling

Posted by in category: electronics

odditymall.co/bbtve

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May 14, 2017

3D Body Scanner

Posted by in category: electronics

Can this 3D body scanner help you get fit?

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Mar 20, 2017

These new electronic glasses allow the legally blind to see

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, electronics

Toronto-based eSight Corp. has launched a pair of electronic glasses that allow the legally blind to see. The eSight3 glasses use high-tech image processing to give those who are legally blind the chance to experience what it is like to have 20/20 vision.

Users can control a variety of functions that are important for vision, including magnification, contrast, brightness and focus. Videos projected onto two OLED screens in front of the eyes allow the user to see the different functions in action.

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