Menu

Blog

Archive for the ‘holograms’ category

Jul 14, 2021

Acoustic Tractor Beam Can Grab Objects From Behind Obstacles

Posted by in categories: holograms, tractor beam

An acoustic tractor beam that can bend sound around an obstacle to levitate an object on the other side has been created by researchers in the UK. Dubbed SoundBender, the device combines an ultrasound transducer array with an acoustic metamaterial.

In recent years, researchers have used transducer arrays to build sonic tractor beams that can create complex acoustic holograms to manipulate objects in mid-air. Acoustic metamaterials are engineered materials with structural properties that do not usually occur naturally. They have been used to produce acoustic holograms, bend beams of sound and create static acoustic levitation devices. But the team behind the SoundBender, based at the University of Sussex, say that these technologies have key limitations.

Continue reading “Acoustic Tractor Beam Can Grab Objects From Behind Obstacles” »

May 11, 2021

MIT artificial intelligence tech can generate 3D holograms in real-time

Posted by in categories: holograms, robotics/AI, virtual reality

Despite years of hype, virtual reality headsets have yet to topple TV or computer screens as the go-to devices for video viewing.

One reason: VR can make users feel sick. Nausea and eye strain can result because VR creates an illusion of 3D viewing although the user is in fact staring at a fixed-distance 2D display. The solution for better 3D visualization could lie in a 60-year-old technology remade for the digital world: holograms.

Continue reading “MIT artificial intelligence tech can generate 3D holograms in real-time” »

May 11, 2021

Hologram experts can now create real-life images that move in the air

Posted by in categories: computing, holograms, military, space, weapons

They may be tiny weapons, but Brigham Young University’s holography research group has figured out how to create lightsabers—green for Yoda and red for Darth Vader, naturally—with actual luminous beams rising from them.

Inspired by the displays of science fiction, the researchers have also engineered battles between equally small versions of the Starship Enterprise and a Klingon Battle Cruiser that incorporate photon torpedoes launching and striking the enemy vessel that you can see with the naked eye.

Continue reading “Hologram experts can now create real-life images that move in the air” »

May 9, 2021

U.S. researchers create sci-fi-style laser holograms that can move in the air

Posted by in categories: holograms, weapons

Researchers from Utah have figured out how to use lasers to create sci-fi-style holograms inspired by phasers from ‘Star Trek’ and lightsabers from ‘Star Wars.’

May 6, 2021

New algorithm uses a hologram to control trapped ions

Posted by in categories: computing, engineering, holograms, information science, quantum physics

Researchers have discovered the most precise way to control individual ions using holographic optical engineering technology.

The new technology uses the first known holographic optical engineering device to control trapped ion qubits. This technology promises to help create more precise controls of qubits that will aid the development of quantum industry-specific hardware to further new quantum simulation experiments and potentially quantum error correction processes for trapped ion qubits.

“Our algorithm calculates the hologram’s profile and removes any aberrations from the light, which lets us develop a highly precise technique for programming ions,” says lead author Chung-You Shih, a Ph.D. student at the University of Waterloo’s Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC).

Apr 7, 2021

Physicists Have Developed A ‘Quantum’ Hologram Using Entanglement

Posted by in categories: holograms, particle physics, quantum physics

Researchers have used a quantum mechanical property to overcome some of the limitations of conventional holograms. The new approach, detailed in Nature Physics, employed quantum entanglement, allowing two photons to become a single “non-local particle.” A series of entangled photon pairs is key to producing new and improved holograms.

Classical holograms work by using a single light beam split into two. One beam is sent towards the object you’re recreating and is reflected onto a special camera. The second beam is sent directly onto the camera. By measuring the differences in light, its phase, you can reconstruct a 3D image. A key property in this is the wave’s coherence.

The quantum hologram shares some of these principles but its execution is very different. It starts by splitting a laser beam in two, but these two beams will not be reunited. The key is in the splitting. As you can see in the image below, the blue laser hits a nonlinear crystal, which creates two beams made of pairs of entangled photons.

Continue reading “Physicists Have Developed A ‘Quantum’ Hologram Using Entanglement” »

Apr 4, 2021

DJI’s success fuels Shenzhen’s rise as centre of global drone industry

Posted by in categories: drones, holograms, mobile phones, robotics/AI

Huaqiangbei, the world’s largest electronics wholesale market area in the Chinese technology hub of Shenzhen, has become the latest Wonderland for geeks, the way Tokyo’s Akihabara was to otaku during the tech bubble at the turn of the millennium. Amid the warren of closet-sized shops and makeshift stalls, the latest catalogue of smartphones, LED lights, holograms, electronic parts and every type of gadget imaginable compete for attention and the spending yuan of consumers.


Shenzhen has become an international hotspot for the unmanned aerial vehicle industry, following the global success of drone giant DJI.

Continue reading “DJI’s success fuels Shenzhen’s rise as centre of global drone industry” »

Mar 23, 2021

‘Doodles of light’ in real time mark leap for holograms at home

Posted by in categories: holograms, information science, supercomputing

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have devised and implemented a simplified algorithm for turning freely drawn lines into holograms on a standard desktop CPU. They dramatically cut down the computational cost and power consumption of algorithms that require dedicated hardware. It is fast enough to convert writing into lines in real time, and makes crisp, clear images that meet industry standards. Potential applications include hand-written remote instructions superimposed on landscapes and workbenches.

T potential applications of holography include important enhancements to vital, practical tasks, including remote instructions for surgical procedures, electronic assembly on circuit boards, or directions projected on landscapes for navigation. Making holograms available in a wide range of settings is vital to bringing this technology out of the lab and into daily life.

One of the major drawbacks of this state-of-the-art technology is the computational load of generation. The kind of quality we’ve come to expect in our 2D displays is prohibitive in 3D, requiring supercomputing levels of number crunching to achieve. There is also the issue of power consumption. More widely available hardware like GPUs in gaming rigs might be able to overcome some of these issues with raw power, but the amount of electricity they use is a major impediment to mobile applications. Despite improvements to available hardware, the solution can’t be achieved by brute force.

Mar 14, 2021

Using Artificial Intelligence to Generate 3D Holograms in Real-Time on a Smartphone

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, holograms, mobile phones, robotics/AI, virtual reality

A new method called tensor holography could enable the creation of holograms for virtual reality, 3D printing, medical imaging, and more — and it can run on a smartphone.

Despite years of hype, virtual reality headsets have yet to topple TV or computer screens as the go-to devices for video viewing. One reason: VR can make users feel sick. Nausea and eye strain can result because VR creates an illusion of 3D viewing although the user is in fact staring at a fixed-distance 2D display. The solution for better 3D visualization could lie in a 60-year-old technology remade for the digital world: holograms.

Holograms deliver an exceptional representation of 3D world around us. Plus, they’re beautiful. (Go ahead — check out the holographic dove on your Visa card.) Holograms offer a shifting perspective based on the viewer’s position, and they allow the eye to adjust focal depth to alternately focus on foreground and background.

Continue reading “Using Artificial Intelligence to Generate 3D Holograms in Real-Time on a Smartphone” »

Mar 11, 2021

Using artificial intelligence to generate 3D holograms in real-time

Posted by in categories: holograms, physics, robotics/AI, supercomputing

Holograms deliver an exceptional representation of 3D world around us. Plus, they’re beautiful. (Go ahead — check out the holographic dove on your Visa card.) Holograms offer a shifting perspective based on the viewer’s position, and they allow the eye to adjust focal depth to alternately focus on foreground and background.

Researchers have long sought to make computer-generated holograms, but the process has traditionally required a supercomputer to churn through physics simulations, which is time-consuming and can yield less-than-photorealistic results. Now, MIT researchers have developed a new way to produce holograms almost instantly — and the deep learning-based method is so efficient that it can run on a laptop in the blink of an eye, the researchers say.

Page 1 of 1212345678Last