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Archive for the ‘environmental’ category

Nov 20, 2017

Christiana Figueres Europe Regional Round Table—United Nations Environment Programme Finance Initiative (UNEP FI)

Posted by in categories: environmental, finance, governance, innovation, policy, sustainability

“Former Executive Secretary to UNFCCC, Christiana Figueres has laid down a challenge to UNEP FI’s banking members, and the wider finance industry to increase their allocations to low carbon investments to avoid a 2 degrees scenario. Watch her recording which she made for participants at UNEP FI’s Europe Regional Roundtable on Sustainable Finance which took place in October 2017.”

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Nov 20, 2017

Al Gore — Fiduciary Duty in the 21st century—Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI)

Posted by in categories: business, economics, environmental, finance, governance, sustainability

“Former Vice President and Chairman of Generation Investment Management, Al Gore, introduces PRI, UNEP FI and The Generation Foundation’s Fiduciary duty in the 21st century programme. The project finds that, far from being a barrier, there are positive duties to integrate environmental, social and governance factors in investment processes.”

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Nov 20, 2017

Fifty years since the first United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (1968 — 2018): UNISPACE+50 — United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA)

Posted by in categories: business, environmental, governance, government, law, policy, science, space, space travel, treaties

“UNISPACE+50 will celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the first United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space. It will also be an opportunity for the international community to gather and consider the future course of global space cooperation for the benefit of humankind.

From 20 to 21 June 2018 the international community will gather in Vienna for UNISPACE+50, a special segment of the 61 st session of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS).”

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Nov 18, 2017

Transforming Education through Imagination — even for Tech Execs

Posted by in categories: architecture, education, environmental, human trajectories

Why do Silicon Valley technology executives send their children to an almost tech-free school? Several authors have explored this question, including New York University professor Adam Alter. In his book “Irresistible: The Rise of Addictive Technology and the Business of Keeping Us Hooked” Alter explores the case of a San Francisco Steiner-Waldorf school where 75% of students are the children of Silicon Valley tech execs. How ironic.

In this piece I propose some additional reasons why imaginative education is becoming an approach of choice for parents wanting their children to become innovative, ecologically aware and even, as Whitehead suggests, to develop genius.

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Oct 31, 2017

The carbon catchers of Climeworks

Posted by in categories: climatology, engineering, environmental, solar power, space, sustainability

I was thinking about this thing, and the one in Iceland. Maybe we could build giant blimps in the atmosphere of Venus, it would carry that machine on its belly, and on the back of the blimp super advanced solar panels. Then inside of the blimp the CO2 could be mixed into liquid crystals or something like that and be dropped like rain down on the surface, to eventually terraform it.


Global Engineering — a phrase that describes steadying the world’s climate with technical solutions. A Swiss company has received EU funding to develop a machine that captures CO2. Can it really make a difference?

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Oct 23, 2017

Sucking CO2 from the atmosphere could save the planet — but it isn’t cheap

Posted by in categories: business, climatology, environmental, geoengineering, space, sustainability

Should definitely be worked on. Eventually the same stuff could be used to reverse engineer/terraform Venus.


When politicians talk about the Paris Climate Agreement, it’s usually framed in terms of restrictions on emissions for states and businesses. But the Paris Agreement wasn’t just an agreement to regulate — it was also an agreement to innovate. That’s because most experts agree that the world won’t be able to keep global temperature rise below 2 degrees Celsius, unless there’s a way to physically remove CO2 from the atmosphere.

A Swiss startup called Climeworks has made that their goal, developing the most advanced carbon-capture technology to date. VICE News went to Switzerland to see how the technology works and hear how the business plans to tackle climate change. Problem is, what Climeworks is doing isn’t cheap.

Continue reading “Sucking CO2 from the atmosphere could save the planet — but it isn’t cheap” »

Aug 15, 2017

Massachusetts takes on leadership role with new greenhouse gas-cutting regulations — By Mark Hand | ThinkProgress

Posted by in categories: environmental, governance, government

“Clean energy purchases projected to reach 80 percent by 2050.”

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Aug 8, 2017

Cancer Care in the Future

Posted by in categories: biological, complex systems, disruptive technology, environmental, existential risks, health, homo sapiens, science

The future of cancer care should mean more cost-effective treatments, a greater focus on prevention, and a new mindset: A Surgical Oncologist’s take

Multidisciplinary team management of many types of cancer has led to significant improvements in median and overall survival. Unfortunately, there are still other cancers which we have impacted little. In patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and hepatocellular cancer, we have been able to improve median survival only by a matter of a few months, and at a cost of toxicity associated with the treatments. From the point of view of a surgical oncologist, I believe there will be rapid advances over the next several decades.

Robotic Surgery

There is already one surgery robot system on the market and another will soon be available. The advances in robotics and imaging have allowed for improved 3-dimensional spacial recognition of anatomy, and the range of movement of instruments will continue to improve. Real-time haptic feedback may become possible with enhanced neural network systems. It is already possible to perform some operations with greater facility, such as very low sphincter-sparing operations for rectal adenocarcinoma in patients who previously would have required a permanent colostomy. As surgeons’ ability and experience with new robotic equipment becomes greater, the number and types of operation performed will increase and patient recovery time, length of hospital stay, and return to full functional status will improve. Competition may drive down the exorbitant cost of current equipment.

Continue reading “Cancer Care in the Future” »

Aug 3, 2017

Hyperloop Explained | Hyperloop One

Posted by in categories: environmental, transportation

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Aug 3, 2017

Your Subsidized Fridge is Full of Dead Trees — by Erik Solheim UN Environment Executive Director | UNFCCC

Posted by in categories: economics, environmental, government

“Something is destroying our forests. In tropical regions alone, we lose an area of forest the size of Austria every year.”

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