Menu

Blog

Archive for the ‘particle physics’ category

May 27, 2022

Could the Double-Slit Experiment Finally be Solved?

Posted by in categories: particle physics, quantum physics

The famous double-slit experiment–a now classic showcase of how both light and matter are able to behave as both waves, and particles in their “classical” physical definition–seems almost like magic to many of us.

Because of this unusual function of our physical universe, the double-slit experiment has intrigued physicists for decades, as it suggests the possibility of multiple universes or weird quantum events. However, only recently have researchers at the Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien) found a way to fully validate this experiment, using a particular measurement method on the particle.

May 27, 2022

What if quantum physics could eradicate illness? | Jim Al-Khalili for Big Think

Posted by in categories: biological, evolution, genetics, information science, particle physics, quantum physics

Can quantum science supercharge genetics? | Jim Al-Khalili for Big Think.


This interview is an episode from The Well, our new publication about ideas that inspire a life well-lived, created with the John Templeton Foundation.

Continue reading “What if quantum physics could eradicate illness? | Jim Al-Khalili for Big Think” »

May 26, 2022

Error-free quantum computing gets real

Posted by in categories: computing, information science, particle physics, quantum physics

In modern computers, errors during processing and storage of information have become a rarity due to high-quality fabrication. However, for critical applications, where even single errors can have serious effects, error correction mechanisms based on redundancy of the processed data are still used.

Quantum computers are inherently much more susceptible to disturbances and will thus probably always require error correction mechanisms, because otherwise errors will propagate uncontrolled in the system and information will be lost. Because the fundamental laws of quantum mechanics forbid copying quantum information, redundancy can be achieved by distributing logical quantum information into an entangled state of several physical systems, for example multiple .

The team led by Thomas Monz of the Department of Experimental Physics at the University of Innsbruck and Markus Müller of RWTH Aachen University and Forschungszentrum Jülich in Germany has now succeeded for the first time in realizing a set of computational operations on two logical quantum bits that can be used to implement any possible operation. “For a real-world quantum , we need a universal set of gates with which we can program all algorithms,” explains Lukas Postler, an experimental physicist from Innsbruck.

May 24, 2022

New kind of camera can image mini-whirlpools in quantum liquids

Posted by in categories: particle physics, quantum physics

Researchers have built a camera-like device for understanding how vortices form in quantum liquids, where atoms pair up and start to behave like overlapping waves.

May 22, 2022

Tiny Microdrones Propelled by Light-Driven Nanomotors

Posted by in categories: particle physics, space

A hand-held laser pointer produces no noticeable recoil forces when it is “fired” — even though it emits a directed stream of light particles. The reason for this is simply because of its relatively enormous mass compared to the very tiny recoil impulses that the light particles cause when they leave the laser pointer.

However, it has long been clear that optical recoil forces can indeed have a significant effect on correspondingly small particles. For example, the tails of comets point away from the Sun partly due to light pressure. The propulsion of light spacecraft via light sails has also been discussed repeatedly, most recently in connection with the “starshot” project, in which a fleet of miniature spacecraft is to be sent to Alpha Centauri.

May 19, 2022

UbiQD’s Quantum Dot Tech Is an Electricity Free Lighting Option for Greenhouses

Posted by in categories: food, nanotechnology, particle physics, quantum physics

Circa 2020 Electricity free grow lights using quantum dot leds.


While costs are coming down for controlled environment agriculture, electricity remains one of the highest because it has to power the LEDs that provide the lighting formula for plant growth. But a materials science company called UbiQD wants to change that by replacing electricity with a more efficient means of lighting: quantum dots.

Quantum dots are semiconductor nanoparticles that can transport electrons. When exposed to UV lighting, these particles emit lights of various colors, and can be adjusted in size to emit a specific color. For example, larger particles emit redder wavelengths, while smaller ones shift to blue.

Continue reading “UbiQD’s Quantum Dot Tech Is an Electricity Free Lighting Option for Greenhouses” »

May 19, 2022

Super-sized atoms can be used as a receiver to stream live video

Posted by in category: particle physics

When excited by lasers, a tiny glass container filled with rubidium atoms can act as a receiver for streamed video signals.

May 18, 2022

On the Edge: New Magnetic Phenomenon Discovered With Industrial Potential

Posted by in categories: nanotechnology, particle physics

Working with the tiniest magnets, Hebrew University discovers a new magnetic phenomenon with industrial potential.

For physicists, exploring the realm of the very, very small is a wonderland. Totally new and unexpected phenomena are discovered in the nanoscale, where materials as thin as 100 atoms are explored. Here, nature ceases to behave in a way that is predictable by the macroscopic law of physics, unlike what goes on in the world around us or out in the cosmos.

Dr. Yonathan Anahory at Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU)’s Racah Institute of Physics led the team of researchers, which included HU doctoral student Avia Noah. He spoke of his astonishment when looking at images of the magnetism generated by nano-magnets, “it was the first time we saw a magnet behaving this way,” as he described the images that revealed the phenomenon of “edge magnetism.”

Continue reading “On the Edge: New Magnetic Phenomenon Discovered With Industrial Potential” »

May 18, 2022

“Visualizing the Proton” — Physicists’ Innovative Animation Depicts the Subatomic World in a New Way

Posted by in categories: particle physics, quantum physics

Try to picture a proton — the tiny, positively charged particle within an atomic nucleus — and you may envision a familiar, textbook diagram: a bundle of billiard balls representing quarks and gluons. From the solid sphere model first proposed by John Dalton in 1,803 to the quantum model put forward by Erwin Schrödinger in 1926, there is a storied timeline of physicists attempting to visualize the invisible.

May 17, 2022

A new law unchains fusion energy

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, particle physics

Physicists at EPFL, within a large European collaboration, have revised one of the fundamental laws that has been foundational to plasma and fusion research for over three decades, even governing the design of megaprojects like ITER. The update shows that we can actually safely use more hydrogen fuel in fusion reactors, and therefore obtain more energy than previously thought.

Fusion is one of the most promising sources of future energy. It involves two atomic nuclei combining into one, thereby releasing enormous amounts of energy. In fact, we experience every day: the sun’s warmth comes from fusing into heavier helium atoms.

There is currently an international fusion research megaproject called ITER, which aims to replicate the fusion processes of the sun to create energy on the Earth. Its aim is the creation of high temperature plasma that provides the right environment for fusion to occur, producing energy.

Page 1 of 32312345678Last