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Archive for the ‘neuroscience’ category

Jun 25, 2017

The Four Immortality Stories We Tell Ourselves

Posted by in categories: education, life extension, neuroscience

Since the moment humans became aware of their existence, they have been haunted by the knowledge that it will inevitably come to an end and the hope to change this unfortunate fate.

This month, during Brain Bar Budapest – Europe’s leading conference on the future – Stephen Cave talked about the four immortality stories we tell ourselves and how they are changing in the context of new scientific discoveries and technological advancements. Stephen Cave spent a decade studying and teaching philosophy, and was awarded his PhD in metaphysics from the University of Cambridge in 2001. He is Executive Director of the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence and Senior Research Associate at the University of Cambridge.

Stephen Cave

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Jun 24, 2017

New research suggests problematic memories could be deleted

Posted by in categories: biological, neuroscience

June 22 (UPI) — In a series of experiments, neuroscientists were able to selectively delete different types of memories stored a single neuron belonging to a marine snail.

The feat, detailed in the journal Current Biology, suggests problematic memories — like those responsible for PSTD and anxiety — in the human brain could be excised without harming other memories.

When the brain stores a traumatic experience in its memory bank, the memory is actually stored in multiple forms. Each memory can include bits of incidental information from the experience. Years later, these incidental, or neutral, memories can trigger panic attacks and severe anxiety.

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Jun 22, 2017

Testosterone Hormone Linked to Higher IQ

Posted by in category: neuroscience

University of Alberta researcher Marty Mrazik, Ph.D., says being bright may be due to an excess level of a natural hormone.

Mrazik, and a colleague have published a paper in Roeper Review linking giftedness (having an IQ score of 130 or higher) to prenatal exposure of higher levels of testosterone.

Mrazik hypothesizes that, in the same way that physical and cognitive deficiencies may develop in utero, so too could similar exposure to this naturally occurring chemical result in giftedness.

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Jun 20, 2017

The Elite Want to Transfer Consciousness Into a New Body and Live Forever

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension, nanotechnology, neuroscience, Ray Kurzweil, transhumanism

A conspiracy theory article that I think is spreading semi-fake news (but it’s interesting to see how some people react to #transhumanism):


While the title of this article may sound like it belongs on a strange and dark science fiction movie, it doesn’t. Unfortunately, it seems that as the technological world continues to advance, the more the old adage ‘the truth is stranger than fiction’ becomes true.

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Jun 15, 2017

The New Gnosticism of the Transhumanists

Posted by in categories: computing, cyborgs, geopolitics, life extension, neuroscience, singularity, transhumanism

New story about the recent book on #transhumanism To Be a Machine:


For the (very very quickly) upcoming Love & Death Issue, I had the chance to interview the journalist, Mark O’Connell, who is the author most recently of To Be A Machine: Adventures Among Cyborgs, Utopians, Hackers, and the Futurists Solving the Modest Problem of Death. He also wrote that amazing piece in the New York Times Magazine a few months ago about Zoltan Istvan, the transhumanist who ran for president and drove across the country in a coffin-shaped bus. O’Connell’s new book reads like a travelogue among characters like Zoltan, futuristic types (mostly from California) that O’Connell describes with a charming blend of cynicism and aloof interest. Like an agnostic amidst a group of “true believers,” O’Connell is both repelled by and drawn in by the belief system that transhumanism proffers.

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Jun 14, 2017

Organ chips get smart and go electric

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, engineering, health, neuroscience

Organs-on-Chips (Organ Chips) are emerging as powerful tools that allow researchers to study the physiology of human organs and tissues in ways not possible before. By mimicking normal blood flow, the mechanical microenvironment, and how different tissues physically interface with one another in living organs, they offer a more systematic approach to testing drugs than other in vitro methods that ultimately could help to replace animal testing.

As it can take weeks to grow human cells into intact differentiated and functional tissues within Organ Chips, such as those that mimic the lung and intestine, and researchers seek to understand how drugs, toxins or other perturbations alter tissue structure and function, the team at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering led by Donald Ingber has been searching for ways to non-invasively monitor the health and maturity of cells cultured within these microfluidic devices over extended times.

It has been particularly difficult to measure changes in electrical functions of cells grown within Organ Chips that are normally electrically active, such as neuronal cells in the brain or beating heart cells, both during their differentiation and in response to drugs.

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Jun 14, 2017

Neural Implant Tech Raises the Specter of Brainjacking

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, Elon Musk, internet, neuroscience

Fun in fiction. Perhaps not so much in reality.


The human mind is already pretty open to manipulation—just ask anyone who works in advertising. But neural implant technology could potentially open up a direct digital link to our innermost thoughts that could be exploited by hackers.

In recent months, companies like Elon Musk’s Neuralink, Kernel, and Facebook have unveiled plans to create devices that will provide a two-way interface between human brains and machines.

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Jun 13, 2017

The human brain sees the world as an 11-dimensional multiverse

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

New research suggests that the human brain is almost beyond comprehension because it doesn’t process the world in two dimensions or even three. No, the human brain understands the visual world in up to 11 different dimensions.

The astonishing discovery helps explain why even cutting-edge technologies like functional MRIs have such a hard time explaining what is going on inside our noggins. In a functional MRI, brain activity is monitored and represented as a three-dimensional image that changes over time. However, if the brain is actually working in 11 dimensions, looking at a 3D functional MRI and saying that it explains brain activity would be like looking at the shadow of a head of a pin and saying that it explains the entire universe, plus a multitude of other dimensions.

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Jun 11, 2017

Scientists Claim to ‘Upload Knowledge Into the Brain’ Using Matrix-Style Device

Posted by in categories: entertainment, neuroscience

Scientists at HRL labs claim to have built a device that could upload knowledge directly into the brain just like the matrix films.

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Jun 8, 2017

A Hardware Update for the Human Brain

Posted by in categories: computing, neuroscience

From Silicon Valley startups to the U.S. Department of Defense, scientists and engineers are hard at work on a brain-computer interface that could turn us into programmable, debuggable machines.

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