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Archive for the ‘neuroscience’ category

Nov 20, 2017

The Policy Prognosis for AI: Winner of the SSUNS 2017 Essay Contest

Posted by in categories: economics, education, Elon Musk, employment, health, neuroscience, policy, quantum physics, robotics/AI, transhumanism

Furthermore, with advancements in quantum computing and machine learning, many notable public figures, including Stephen Hawking and Elon Musk, have indicated a growing concern with the imminent threat of AI surpassing human intelligence (Gosset, 2017). For instance, Darrell M. West, a political scientist, has proposed a protectionist framework that appeals to transhumanism, in which he restructures socioeconomic policy to account for changes in technology-induced unemployment. In particular, he posits that “Separating the dispersion of health care, disability, and pension benefits outside of employment offers workers with limited skills social benefits on a universal basis” (West, 2015). Expounding upon this equivocation, a more viable solution to potential unemployment is the realization of a multi-faceted policy which advocates the improvement of STEM-related education on a broad economic base, with habituation programs for the unskilled workforce. That is, with the implementation of appropriate and reformatory policies concerning the future development of AI technologies, this sector provides an economic incentive for new job creation, compatible with industrial development.


Prompt: What are the political implications of artificial intelligence technology and how should policy makers ensure this technology will benefit diverse sectors of society?

In recent years, the rapid development and mass proliferation of artificial intelligence have had various sociopolitical implications. It is a commonly held belief that the emergence of this technology will have an unprecedented impact on policies and political agendas. However, such discourse often lacks a geopolitical and social dimension, which limits the breadth of analysis. Further, little consideration has been given to potential employment and public policy reform. Growing concerns have been raised regarding the potential risk inherent in the evolution of strong AI, which provides the basis for transhumanism, whereby it is conjectured that AI will eventually be able to surpass human intelligence. As such, it is incumbent upon the upcoming generation of policymakers to implement and adopt necessary measures, which will provide a careful, multilateral framework, ultimately achieving market-oriented technological advancement with respect to employment and public policy.

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Nov 19, 2017

Why I’m Digging Deep Into Alzheimer’s

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

This effects whole families and their emotional well being!


Bill Gates shares his thoughts on Alzheimer’s disease and his hopes for accelerating progress to find a breakthrough.

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Nov 18, 2017

Neuroscience Is Helping Us Build a Machine With Consciousness

Posted by in category: neuroscience

I always wondered if this was possible.


In a paper published, Science describes a team of neuroscientists striving to grasp the computational aspect of consciousness, and port it to a machine.

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Nov 15, 2017

Doctors are gene editing inside the body of a living human for the first time

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, neuroscience

He is the first patient to receive an experimental gene therapy as part of a clinical trial. Earlier this week, Sangamo Therapeutics injected Madeux with viruses containing a package of gene-editing material, according to the AP. The hope is that these viruses will enter Madeux’s cells, specifically liver cells, inject the missing gene at the right place in his DNA. Only about 1% of the liver’s cells need to be fixed, and give his liver the ability to produce the enzyme he has been missing all his life.


Brian Madeux’s life hasn’t been easy. So far, he’s had 26 operations to fix problems in everything from hernias to eyes. He has a rare disease called Hunter syndrome, which is caused by the lack of a gene that’s used to produce an enzyme that breaks down certain carbohydrates. As a result, the carbohydrates build up in his body’s cells causing all sorts of problems.

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Nov 15, 2017

For The First Time Ever Scientists Have Boosted Human Memory With a Brain Implant

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cyborgs, Elon Musk, engineering, neuroscience

With everyone from Elon Musk to MIT to the US Department of Defense researching brain implants, it seems only a matter of time before such devices are ready to help humans extend their natural capabilities.

Now, a professor from the University of Southern California (USC) has demonstrated the use of a brain implant to improve the human memory, and the device could have major implications for the treatment of one of the US’s deadliest diseases.

Dong Song is a research associate professor of biomedical engineering at USC, and he recently presented his findings on a “memory prosthesis” during a meeting of the Society for Neuroscience in Washington D.C. According to a New Scientist report, the device is the first to effectively improve the human memory.

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Nov 14, 2017

Security Breach and Spilled Secrets Have Shaken the N.S.A. to Its Core

Posted by in categories: business, cybercrime/malcode, neuroscience

A serial leak of the agency’s cyberweapons has damaged morale, slowed intelligence operations and resulted in hacking attacks on businesses and civilians worldwide.

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Nov 12, 2017

Listen: Adam Savage interviews Natasha Vita-More

Posted by in categories: cosmology, evolution, neuroscience, transhumanism

The SYFY25: Origin Stories Podcast, hosted by Adam Savage (editor-in-chief, tested.com and former co-host of Mythbusters), is a nostalgic celebration of all things science fiction. In this podcast series Adam sits down with creators, thought-leaders, and celebrity fans to discuss the moments, people, and milestones that have changed the genre universe forever. From revealing personal anecdotes to deep philosophical discussions.

Transhumanist philosopher Natasha Vita-More chats with Adam and explains what transhumanism means for us regular humans, how it will impact the evolution of humanity, and close we are to uploading our brains into databases, ensuring our immortality.

Listen on iTunes.

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Nov 12, 2017

This $100-million Startup Plans to Put Chips Into Human Brains to Enhance Intelligence

Posted by in categories: computing, neuroscience

A startup with a $100 million investment wants to implant chips into human brains to enhance their abilities.

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Nov 8, 2017

Outcry as scientists implant tiny human brains inside rats

Posted by in categories: futurism, neuroscience

Tiny human brains connected to the minds of rats have sparked a major ethical debate among researchers.

Two papers being presented at a renowned US neuroscience conference this week claim to have hooked human brain tissue to the minds of rats and mice.

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Nov 7, 2017

Fluidic transistor ushers the age of liquid computers

Posted by in categories: computing, neuroscience, space travel

Transistors, those tiny electrical switches that process signals and data, are the brain power behind every electronic device – from laptops and smartphones to your digital thermostat. As they continue to shrink in size, computers have become smaller, more powerful, and more pervasive. However, as we look to build squishy, human-friendly machines that have the look and feel of soft natural organisms, we need to look beyond the rigid materials used to create electrical switches and circuits.

Mechanical engineers Carmel Majidi and James Wissman of the Soft Machines Lab at Carnegie Mellon University have been looking at new ways to create electronics that are not just digitally functional but also soft and deformable. Rather than making from rigid metals like copper or silver, they use a special metal alloy that is liquid at room temperature. This alloy, made by mixing indium and gallium, is a non-toxic alternative to mercury and can be infused in rubber to make circuits that are as soft and elastic as natural skin.

Teaming up with Michael Dickey at North Carolina State University, they recently discovered that electronics are not only useful for stretchable circuit wiring but can also be used to make . These fluidic transistors work by opening and closing the connection between two liquid metal droplets. When a voltage drop is applied in one direction, the droplets move towards each other and coalesce to form a metallic bridge for conducting electricity. When voltage is applied in a different direction, the droplets spontaneously break apart and turn the switch to open. By quickly alternating between an open and closed and open switch state with only a small amount of voltage, the researchers were able to mimic the properties of a conventional transistor.

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