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Archive for the ‘materials’ category

Mar 19, 2017

Scientists Just Found an Unexpected Property in a Solid Metal: It ‘Remembers’ Its Liquid State

Posted by in category: materials

Researchers have probed samples of metal bismuth, and found a completely unexpected property — under certain conditions, the solid metal can retain a type of ‘structural memory’ of its liquid state.

The fact that scientists have found a new property of metals is exciting enough. But this also means solid bismuth can go from being repelled by a magnetic field (diamagnetic) to being attracted to a magnetic field (ferromagnetic), which could lead to a whole new way of creating materials with unique properties.

The phases of matter we learn about in high school, such as liquid, gas, and solid, are all defined by the way molecules in matter are arranged depending on external conditions. For example, liquid water freezes and contracts together, expanding into ice, or relaxes and boils into steam.

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Mar 17, 2017

Electrons Have Been Caught Disappearing and Reappearing Between Atomic Layers

Posted by in categories: materials, quantum physics

Scientist have spotted a strange type of quantum movement occurring in electrons travelling between the atomic layers of a material.

Instead of travelling from the top to the bottom layer through the middle, the electrons were caught disappearing from the top layer and reappearing in the bottom letter a fraction of a second later — with no trace of them existing in between.

“Electrons can show up on the first floor, then the third floor, without ever having been on the second floor,” said lead researcher Hui Zhao from the University of Kansas.

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Mar 6, 2017

Nanotechnology Combatting Global Warming

Posted by in categories: chemistry, complex systems, disruptive technology, energy, environmental, innovation, materials, nanotechnology, Singularity University, sustainability, transportation

Superlubricity nano-structured self-assembling coating repairs surface wear, decreases emissions and increases HP and gas mileage.

Globally about 15 percent of manmade carbon dioxide comes from vehicles. In more developed countries, cars, trucks, airplanes, ships and other vehicles account for a third of emissions related to climate change. Emissions standards are fueling the lubricant additives market with innovation.

Up to 33% of fuel energy in vehicles is used to overcome friction. Tribology is the science of interacting surfaces in relative motion inclusive of friction, wear and lubrication. This is where TriboTEX, a nanotechnology startup is changing the game of friction modification and wear resilience with a lubricant additive that forms a nano-structured coating on metal alloys.

This nano-structured coating increases operating efficiency and component longevity. It is comprised of synthetic magnesium silicon hydroxide nanoparticles that self-assemble as an ultralow friction layer, 1/10 of the original friction resistance. The coating is self-repairing during operation, environmentally inert and extracts carbon from the oil. The carbon diamond-like nano-particle lowers the friction budget of the motor, improving fuel economy and emissions in parallel while increasing the power and longevity of the motor.

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Mar 1, 2017

3D printing with high-performance carbon fiber

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, materials

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have become the first to 3D print aerospace-grade carbon fiber composites, opening the door to greater control and optimization of the lightweight, yet stronger than steel material.

The research, published by the journal Nature Scientific Reports online on Feb. 28, represents a “significant advance” in the development of micro-extrusion 3D printing techniques for carbon fiber, the authors reported.

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Feb 27, 2017

Sound-shaping metamaterial invented

Posted by in category: materials

A super-material that bends, shapes and focuses sound waves that pass through it has been invented by scientists.

The creation pushes the boundaries of metamaterials — a new class of finely-engineered surfaces that perform nature-defying tasks.

These materials have already shown remarkable results with light manipulation, allowing scientists to create a real-life version of Harry Potter’s invisibility cloak, for example.

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Feb 27, 2017

Chiral superconductivity experimentally demonstrated for the first time

Posted by in categories: materials, nanotechnology

(Phys.org)—Scientists have found that a superconducting current flows in only one direction through a chiral nanotube, marking the first observation of the effects of chirality on superconductivity. Until now, superconductivity has only been demonstrated in achiral materials, in which the current flows in both directions equally.

The team of researchers, F. Qin et al., from Japan, the US, and Israel, have published a paper on the first observation of chiral in a recent issue of Nature Communications.

Chiral superconductivity combines two typically unrelated concepts in a single material: Chiral materials have mirror images that are not identical, similar to how left and right hands are not identical because they cannot be superimposed one on top of the other. And superconducting materials can conduct an electric current with zero resistance at very low temperatures.

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Feb 27, 2017

Universal Everything’s Futuristic Prototypes Build on Humanity’s Relationship With Technology

Posted by in categories: futurism, materials

‘screens of the future’ is a digital series of protuct prototypes based on the emerging technologies of flexible display and shape-shifting materials.

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Feb 26, 2017

New metamaterial is proved to be the world’s first to achieve the performance predicted by theoretical bounds

Posted by in categories: materials, transportation

In 2015 UC Santa Barbara mechanical engineer and materials scientist Jonathan Berger developed an idea that could change the way people think about high-performance structural materials. Two years later, his concept is paying research dividends.

In a letter published in the journal Nature, Berger, with UCSB materials and mechanical engineering professor Robert McMeeking and materials scientist Haydn N. G. Wadley from the University of Virginia, prove that the three-dimensional pyramid-and-cross cell geometry Berger conceived is the first of its kind to achieve the performance predicted by theoretical bounds. Its lightness, strength and versatility, according to Berger, lends itself well to a variety of applications, from buildings to vehicles to packaging and transport.

Called Isomax, the beauty of this solid foam—in this case loosely defined as a combination of a stiff substance and air pockets—lay in the geometry within. Instead of the typical assemblage of bubbles or a honeycomb arrangement, the ordered cells were set apart by walls forming the shapes of pyramids with three sides and a base, and octahedra, reinforced inside with a “cross” of intersecting diagonal walls.

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Feb 23, 2017

Nano Thread Enables Scientists to Extend Length of Brain Implant Efficacy

Posted by in categories: materials, neuroscience

There is way more coming in BMI.


Researcher Dr. Luan and his interdisciplinary team from the University of Texas at Austin have developed an ultra flexible nanoelectronic thread (NET) that has the potential to offer a new type of the long-term neural implants. Neural probes are used to directly measure or even stimulate electrical activity in specific regions of the brain. However, despite the many advances in the field, issues with biocompatibility have limited the prospects and usefulness of the technology. Conventional probes induce scarring around the implant over time, which in turn increasingly impairs the devices’ ability to measure electrical impulses. This scarring is a result of conventional probes’ width, material, and lack of flexibility.

Due to the micrometer dimensions of the NET and its insulation, the implant doesn’t trigger the development of scar tissue and continues working for months at a time. Publishing in the journal Science Advances, the researchers describe the NET from 7 nm nanoprobes layered together and two to three layers of insulation. The layers together total to about 1 µm in thickness, which grants the probe flexibility that is almost 1000 times greater than conventional probes. This flexibility allows the device to remain in place without hindering the movement of or displacing surrounding tissue.

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Feb 23, 2017

Nano-size revolution is getting bigger

Posted by in categories: materials, nanotechnology

And, we just started. Just wait — in the next 6 to 8 months; I will some amazing news to share on QBS and BMI. smile


An explosion of nanotechnology research and development is occurring as newly identified forms of carbon, including graphene, carbon nanotubes and nano-diamonds, pave the way for new products and industries.

This article is sponsored by Flinders University.

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