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Archive for the ‘bioengineering’ category

Oct 22, 2021

Gene editing can turn storage fat cells into energy-burning fat cells

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, health

A team of researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center’s Touchstone Diabetes Center have successfully used CRISPR gene editing to turn fat cells normally used for storage into energy-burning cells.

“It’s like flipping a switch. We removed the ‘brake’ on the energy burning pathway in by engineering a mutation that disrupts the interaction between a single pair of proteins,” said study leader Rana Gupta, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Internal Medicine. “Our research demonstrates that releasing this brake in fat cells can potentially help make existing much more effective.”

The research at UT Southwestern, ranked as one of the nation’s top 25 hospitals for diabetes and endocrinology care, is published in Genes and Development and supported by the National Institutes of Health.

Oct 21, 2021

Pig kidney attached to human found to work normally

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical

Surgeons have successfully attached a pig’s kidney to a human and confirmed that the body accepted the transplant in a major scientific breakthrough, The New York Times reported.

This successful operation is a promising sign as scientists work to be able to use animal organs in life-saving transplants in humans.

Scientists altered a pig gene and engineered the kidney to eliminate sugar to avoid an immune system attack. In the past, the human body would reject the transplant due to the presence of glycan, a sugar molecule in pig cells.

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Oct 21, 2021

Joanna Bensz — Founder and CEO, Longevity Center And International Institute of Longevity (IIOL)

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, business, life extension

Science, Technology & Protocols For Healthy Longevity And Sustainable Health — Joanna Bensz, Founder and CEO, Longevity Center & International Institute of Longevity (IIOL), joins me on Progress, Potential, And Possibilities Geopolitical Intelligence Services #Health #Wellness #Aging #Longevity #JoannaBensz #PrinceMichaelOfLiechtenstein


Joanna Bensz is Founder and CEO of Longevity Center (https://longevity-center.eu/), a boutique preventive health and longevity medical center, that focuses on scientifically and medically advanced technologies and protocols for healthy longevity and sustainable health.

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Oct 20, 2021

Super-Precise CRISPR Gene Editing Tool Is Set to Tackle Tough Genetic Diseases

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics

Scientists reworked CRISPR prime’s molecular makeup to precisely cut out up to 10,000 DNA letters in one go, and increased the tool’s efficiency eight-fold.

Oct 14, 2021

Scientists Can Grow Meat Protein. With Gene-Edited Barley?

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, climatology, genetics, sustainability

ORF Genetics in Iceland is growing 100,000 genetically engineered barley plants in a greenhouse measuring over 22 square feet (2 sq m) to create lab-grown meat.

This cutting-edge approach has the potential to lower prices, eliminate reliance on live animals in the lab-grown meat sector, and speed up the scaling-up process, according to BBC. And, with the fact that meat accounts for nearly 60 percent of all greenhouse gases from food production in mind, such a development could have far-reaching implications in the fight against climate change.

Oct 13, 2021

Ray Kurzweil — Immortality by 2045

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, government, life extension, nanotechnology, Ray Kurzweil, robotics/AI, singularity, virtual reality

Ray Kurzweil — Singularitarian Immortalist, Director of Engineering at Google, famous inventor, author of How to Create a Mind http://GF2045.com/speakers/.

A world-class prolific inventor and leading futurist author, “the restless genius” (Wall Street Journal) points to 2045 for the technological singularity when A.I. will surpass human intelligence in his New York Times best seller The Singularity is Near, Amazon’s #1 book in science and philosophy.

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Oct 13, 2021

Scientists Genetically Modify Plants to Grow Meat Protein

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, genetics

Researchers in Iceland are growing over 100,000 genetically modified barley plants inside a greenhouse for a very unusual purpose: creating lab-grown meat, the BBC reports.

The altered barley gets harvested and purified to extract “growth factor” proteins, which, in turn, can be used to cultivate lab-grown meat — an innovation that could make the lab-grown meat industry rely even less on live animals in the future.

The company behind the greenhouse, ORF Genetics, is growing the biogenetically engineered barley over 22,000 square feet using high-tech hydroponic cultivation methods.

Oct 11, 2021

Scientists Revive 28,000-Year-Old Woolly Mammoth Cells in Mice

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biological, genetics

Circa 2019 o.o


The dream of resurrecting species like the woolly mammoth via genetic engineering is old enough that I remember reading articles about it in school 30 years ago. We may never be able to recover enough pristine genetic material from an intact woolly mammoth to make that approach feasible, but scientists working on the remains of the frozen mammoth known as Yuka have taken an incredible step nonetheless, demonstrating that at least some cell functions can remain intact after nearly 30,000 years.

Yuka, found in 2,010 is a juvenile woolly mammoth, considered to be the most intact and well-preserved mammoth ever found. That was critical to the researchers’ efforts — earlier tests in 2009 with a less-well-preserved but younger specimen at 15,000 years old yielded no positive results at all.

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Oct 10, 2021

Scientists Develop New “Unbreakable Glass” Inspired by Nature — 3x Stronger, 5x More Fracture-Resistant

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, materials

Strongest and toughest glass known developed by McGill University scientists.

Scientists from McGill University develop stronger and tougher glass, inspired by the inner layer of mollusk shells. Instead of shattering upon impact, the new material has the resiliency of plastic and could be used to improve cell phone screens in the future, among other applications.

While techniques like tempering and laminating can help reinforce glass, they are costly and no longer work once the surface is damaged. “Until now there were trade-offs between high strength, toughness, and transparency. Our new material is not only three times stronger than the normal glass, but also more than five times more fracture-resistant,” says Allen Ehrlicher, an Associate Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at McGill University.

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Oct 5, 2021

Dr. Maria Elena Bottazzi — National School of Tropical Medicine — Baylor College of Medicine

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical

Diagnosing, Treating, And Preventing Neglected Tropical Diseases — Dr. Maria Elena Bottazzi, BCM National School of Tropical Medicine, Baylor University.


Dr. Maria Elena Bottazzi (https://www.bcm.edu/people-search/maria-bottazzi-18431) is Distinguished Professor of Biology, Associate Dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine, and Professor in the Departments of Pediatrics, Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Integrative Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, and Translational Biology and Molecular Medicine, at Baylor College of Medicine.

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