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Archive for the ‘bioengineering’ category

Jun 20, 2017

New CRISPR improvement allows multiple gene edits and better accuracy

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics

Researchers at the Scripps Research Institute Florida campus have refined the already state-of-the-art gene-editing system CRISPR. The new improvements boost the ability of CRISPR to target, cut and paste genes in human and animal cells and helps to address the concerns of off target gene mutations raised in a recent study [1].

What is CRISPR?

CRISPR is short for “Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat,” and is a gene editing system that exploits an ancient bacterial immune defense process. Some microbes combat viral infection by sequestering a piece of a virus’ foreign genetic material within its own DNA, to serve as a template. The next time the viral sequence is encountered by the microbe, it is detected immediately and cut up for disposal with the help of two types of RNA. Molecules called guide RNAs show the location of the invader, and the CRISPR effector proteins act as the scissors that cut it apart and destroy it.

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Jun 8, 2017

Engineering Eden: The quest for eternal life

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, life extension, transhumanism

Dr. Kristin Kostick discusses the intersection of faith and science, and how there may be room for both in a transhuman future.

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May 29, 2017

For The First Time Ever, CRISPR Gene Editing Was Used in Humans. So What’s Next?

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, space

  • With Chinese scientists announcing that they have tested CRISPR on a human for the first time, the U.S. must decide soon whether it will be a leader or a follower in advancing the tech.
  • While gene editing technology could be used in nefarious ways, it could also cure diseases and improve millions of lives, but we won’t know how effective it is until we begin human trials.

While the middle part of the 20th century saw the world’s superpowers racing to explore space, the first global competition of this century is being set in a much smaller arena: our DNA.

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May 27, 2017

5 Emerging Biomedical Engineering Trends to Watch

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical

Biomedical engineering has long been a driver of advances in healthcare. From new technologies to diagnose and treat some of the most complex disease to advances that improve quality of life for everyone, the work taking place in labs around the world right now is likely to change the face of healthcare in both the short- and long-term future.

Although there are literally thousands of different projects taking place at this very moment, there are some definite trends taking place in biomedical engineering.

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May 22, 2017

MIT used bacteria to create a self-ventilating workout shirt

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, wearables

Many rain jackets have zippers at the armpits that, when opened, let out perspiration and funk that would otherwise stay trapped inside. But researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a prototype of a wearable that vents itself automatically in response to sweat—and it does so using bacteria.

Wen Wang, the lead author of a new study about biohybrid wearables in the journal Science Advances, says that the garment with bacteria-triggered vents represents just a stepping stone on their way to creating shirts that do something even better: produce a pleasant smell when you sweat.

To make the prototype garment, the researchers experimented with different structures of latex and bacteria, says Wang, a bioengineer and former research scientist at MIT’s Media Lab and the university’s department of chemical engineering. One such configuration involved just two layers: bacteria on one side, and latex on the other. But what worked best for creating the vented wearable was coating latex on both sides with a type of bacteria called B. subtilis.

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May 18, 2017

A Bioengineered ‘Pancreas’ Has Ended One Diabetic’s Need For Insulin

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical

Even the most exciting breakthrough medical treatment can be rendered obsolete by a particularly insurmountable obstacle: time.

If a treatment only works temporarily, it has little chance of making a significant difference in the lives of patients, which is why the latest news from the University of Miami’s Diabetes Research Institute is so exciting.

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May 17, 2017

A bioprosthetic ovary created using 3D printed microporous scaffolds restores ovarian function in sterilized mice

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioengineering, biotech/medical, cyborgs

3D printed ovaries restore fertility to mice. Another step towards more complex organs.


There is a clinical need to develop a bioengineering system to support ovary transplantation. Here, the authors generate a bioprosthetic ovary using 3D printed scaffolds of varying pore architectures to support follicle survival and ovarian function in sterilized mice.

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May 17, 2017

CellAge Has Secured a Seed Fundraising Round

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biological, life extension

CellAge, the synthetic biology company are going from strength to strength thanks to the support of the community last year during their fundraiser at Lifespan.io.


CellAge is featured in Startup Lithuania. As many of you will recall, CellAge hosted a successful project with us at Lifespan.io and they are busy developing a new aging biomarker for researchers thanks to the support of the community.

Now they are going from strength to strength having just secured a seed round backed by Michael Greve’s Kizoo Technology Capital and other investors.

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May 14, 2017

Humans Can Now “Print” Genetic Code and Engineer Life

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, food, genetics

Scientists’ ability to create organisms through synthetic biology is getting easier and cheaper fueling the start of a new era in biology. Synthetic biology has already lead to some innovations such as lab-grown meat, advancement in medicine, and even helping to bring back extinct species.

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May 12, 2017

These Cells Are Engineered to Be Controlled by a Smartphone

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, terrorism

To Dr. Mark Gomelsky, a professor at the University of Wyoming, genetically engineered therapeutic cells are like troops on a mission.

The first act is training. Using genetic editing tools such as CRISPR, scientists can “train” a patient’s own cells to specifically recognize and attack a variety of enemies, including rogue tumor soldiers and HIV terrorists.

Then comes the incursion. Engineered cells are surgically implanted to the target site, where they’re left to immediately carry out the mission. The problem, says Gomelsky, is adding a command center “that could coordinate their activities in real time according to the developing situation,” such as telling cells when to activate and when to stop.

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