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Archive for the ‘bioengineering’ category: Page 4

Dec 27, 2019

How To Build A Tougher Mind: Dr Jon Finn

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, business, education, neuroscience

Dr Shima Beigi BSc, MSc, MSc, Ph.D. founder of Mindfulness Engineering™️ and ideaXme Rich Connectedness™️ ambassador interviews Dr Jon Finn founder Tougher Minds.

Dr Jon Finn:

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Dec 26, 2019

Podcast #39: Quantum Computing, The State of The Art, featuring whurley

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, quantum physics, robotics/AI

“As an entrepreneur I like to know the next two or three things I might start a company on. For me it was robotics, bio-hacking, and quantum.”–whurley.

Dec 25, 2019

A Young Mississippi Woman’s Journey Through A Pioneering Gene-Editing Experiment

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, health

Sickle Cell Therapy With CRISPR Gene Editing Shows Promise : Shots — Health News NPR tells the exclusive, behind-the-scenes story of the first person with a genetic disorder to be treated in the United States with the revolutionary gene-editing technique CRISPR.

Dec 25, 2019

The complicated ethics of genetic engineering

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, ethics, genetics

With new technology to edit genes, scientists are now working on things that once seemed impossible. But what are the boundaries? See the full 60 Minutes interview with Church, here: https://cbsn.ws/34ZhuTs

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Dec 18, 2019

The science news events that shaped 2019

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, computing, ethics, quantum physics, science, space

A year marked by climate protests, political uncertainty and debate over the ethics of gene editing in human embryos proved challenging for science. But researchers also celebrated some exciting firsts — a quantum computer that can outperform its classical counterparts, a photo of a black hole and samples gathered from an asteroid.


Climate strikes, marsquakes and gaming AIs are among the year’s top stories.

Dec 18, 2019

First images of an ‘upgraded’ CRISPR tool

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics

Columbia scientists have captured the first images of a new gene editing tool that could improve upon existing CRISPR-based tools. The team developed the tool, called INTEGRATE, after discovering a unique “jumping gene” in Vibrio cholerae bacteria that could insert large genetic payloads in the genome without introducing DNA breaks.

In the new study, published today in Nature, the researchers harnessed a Nobel Prize-winning technique called cryo-electron microscopy to freeze the gene editing complex in action, revealing high-resolution details about how it works.

“We showed in our first study how to leverage INTEGRATE for targeted DNA insertions in ,” says Sam Sternberg, Ph.D., assistant professor of biochemistry & molecular biophysics at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, who led the research with Israel Fernandez, Ph.D., assistant professor of biochemistry & at Columbia. “These new images, a wonderful collaboration with Israel Fernández’s lab, explain the biology with incredible molecular detail and will help us improve the system by guiding protein engineering efforts.”

Dec 18, 2019

$125 Million For Longevity! — George MacGinnis, Healthy Ageing Challenge Director, UKRI — Government Ageing Society Grand Challenge — ideaXme — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biotech/medical, government, health, life extension, neuroscience, posthumanism, science, transhumanism

Dec 16, 2019

New CRISPR-based system targets amplified antibiotic-resistant genes

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, food, genetics, health

Taking advantage of powerful advances in CRISPR gene editing, scientists at the University of California San Diego have set their sights on one of society’s most formidable threats to human health.

A research team led by Andrés Valderrama at UC San Diego School of Medicine and Surashree Kulkarni of the Division of Biological Sciences has developed a new CRISPR-based gene-drive system that dramatically increases the efficiency of inactivating a gene rendering bacteria antibiotic-resistant. The new system leverages technology developed by UC San Diego biologists in insects and mammals that biases genetic inheritance of preferred traits called “active genetics.” The new “pro-active” genetic system, or Pro-AG, is detailed in a paper published December 16 in Nature Communications.

Widespread prescriptions of and use in animal food production have led to a rising prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in the environment. Evidence indicates that these environmental sources of antibiotic resistance are transmitted to humans and contribute to the current health crisis associated with the dramatic rise in drug-resistant microbes. Health experts predict that threats from antibiotic resistance could drastically increase in the coming decades, leading to some 10 million drug-resistant disease deaths per year by 2050 if left unchecked.

Dec 13, 2019

Nanoscience breakthrough: Probing particles smaller than a billionth of a meter

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, chemistry, nanotechnology

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have developed a new methodology that allows researchers to assess the chemical composition and structure of metallic particles with a diameter of only 0.5 to 2 nm. This breakthrough in analytical techniques will enable the development and application of minuscule materials in the fields of electronics, biomedicine, chemistry, and more.

The study and development of novel materials have enabled countless technological breakthroughs and are essential across most fields of science, from medicine and bioengineering to cutting-edge electronics. The rational design and analysis of innovative materials at nanoscopic scales allows us to push through the limits of previous devices and methodologies to reach unprecedented levels of efficiency and new capabilities. Such is the case for metal nanoparticles, which are currently in the spotlight of modern research because of their myriad potential applications. A recently developed synthesis method using dendrimer molecules as a template allows researchers to create metallic nanocrystals with diameters of 0.5 to 2 nm (billionths of a meter).

Dec 12, 2019

Viewpoint: Rampage movie offers twisted take on CRISPR gene editing

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, entertainment, genetics

Is a film based on a video game with fleeting mentions of a biotech buzzword compelling sci-fi? No. But I liked Rampage anyway.

The use of CRISPR to edit genes is perhaps the only novel plot point in this latest monster movie. An evil head of a biotech company subverts a scientist’s work to fashion a bioweapon that revs up the growth hormone gene, and more, in three unfortunate animals. Cue Godzilla, King Kong, and the beast in Lake Placid.

But the screenwriters seem to confuse gene editing with an infectious bioweapon, like anthrax. The tagline at IMDb reveals the befuddlement: “When three different animals become infected with a dangerous pathogen, a primatologist and a geneticist team up to stop them from destroying Chicago.” Infectious disease, genetic modification, or both?

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