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Archive for the ‘quantum physics’ category

Oct 23, 2019

We’re Stuck Inside the Universe. Lee Smolin Has an Idea for How to Study It Anyway

Posted by in categories: cosmology, education, information science, mathematics, quantum physics

The universe is kind of an impossible object. It has an inside but no outside; it’s a one-sided coin. This Möbius architecture presents a unique challenge for cosmologists, who find themselves in the awkward position of being stuck inside the very system they’re trying to comprehend.

It’s a situation that Lee Smolin has been thinking about for most of his career. A physicist at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada, Smolin works at the knotty intersection of quantum mechanics, relativity and cosmology. Don’t let his soft voice and quiet demeanor fool you — he’s known as a rebellious thinker and has always followed his own path. In the 1960s Smolin dropped out of high school, played in a rock band called Ideoplastos, and published an underground newspaper. Wanting to build geodesic domes like R. Buckminster Fuller, Smolin taught himself advanced mathematics — the same kind of math, it turned out, that you need to play with Einstein’s equations of general relativity. The moment he realized this was the moment he became a physicist. He studied at Harvard University and took a position at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, eventually becoming a founding faculty member at the Perimeter Institute.

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Oct 23, 2019

Google officially lays claim to quantum supremacy

Posted by in categories: quantum physics, supercomputing

The quantum computer Sycamore reportedly performed a calculation that even the most powerful supercomputers available can’t reproduce.

Oct 22, 2019

A weird physics theory is gaining traction. Another version of you might already know it

Posted by in category: quantum physics

New book by Caltech astrophysicist Sean Carroll explores the ‘many worlds’ interpretation of quantum mechanics and its bizarre implications.

Oct 21, 2019

Pushing quantum photonics

Posted by in categories: computing, mobile phones, quantum physics

Quantum computers use the fundamentals of quantum mechanics to potentially speed up the process of solving complex computations. Suppose you need to perform the task of searching for a specific number in a phone book. A classical computer will search each line of the phone book until it finds a match. A quantum computer could search the entire phone book at the same time by assessing each line simultaneously and return a result much faster.

Oct 21, 2019

The idea that everything from spoons to stones is conscious is gaining academic credibility

Posted by in categories: neuroscience, particle physics, quantum physics

The biggest problem caused by panpsychism is known as the “combination problem”: Precisely how do small particles of consciousness collectively form more complex consciousness? Consciousness may exist in all particles, but that doesn’t answer the question of how these tiny fragments of physical consciousness come together to create the more complex experience of human consciousness.

Any theory that attempts to answer that question, would effectively determine which complex systems—from inanimate objects to plants to ants—count as conscious.

An alternative panpsychist perspective holds that, rather than individual particles holding consciousness and coming together, the universe as a whole is conscious. This, says Goff, isn’t the same as believing the universe is a unified divine being; it’s more like seeing it as a “cosmic mess.” Nevertheless, it does reflect a perspective that the world is a top-down creation, where every individual thing is derived from the universe, rather than a bottom-up version where objects are built from the smallest particles. Goff believes quantum entanglement—the finding that certain particles behave as a single unified system even when they’re separated by such immense distances there can’t be a causal signal between them—suggests the universe functions as a fundamental whole rather than a collection of discrete parts.

Oct 21, 2019

A Mythical Form of Space Propulsion Finally Gets a Real Test

Posted by in categories: alien life, genetics, nuclear energy, quantum physics

This does work it essentially is a very powerful microwave oven but it uses the exotic transfer of energy to propel an object. Plasma-based fusion reactors could power it indefinitely as well essentially it just be able to float out of the atmosphere. When it comes to more euclidean geometry or even like curl-free quantum mechanics for essentially space warping I think you could make warp drive with less energy just essentially slip through the ocean of space that is how black holes do it but they do it with gravity wells. I think if a genetic material could do similar things that are how essentially extraterrestrials do it as well it is more just a simple understanding of physics essentially. If the fabled q continuum exists it be essentially the realm of aliens because essentially it allows for travel through the universe without a ship. In fictional stories nightcrawler, a teleporting being was rumored. I think teleportation does exist as it is a qutrit but it is hard understanding travel instantaneously although I think some agencies rumor about it. If we can essentially teleport a photon we can teleport a human being even without a ship it would just require exotic physics and advanced biology. Essentially a portal gun from the Higgs boson could essentially make a physical transfer from one part to another part but it is hard to keep such things stable also there is a problem possibly of radiation you would probably need a suit to travel through a portal. Essentially it could work it just essentially be a wormhole from one point to another point but making that on the skin is essentially too hard unless you understand the properties of wormhole travel better by spaceship it would be easier. Essentially if you knew the physical space-time point by scanning an area you could essentially make a wormhole to that point and travel there. But doing that with genetics is harder as you need exotic properties or a better understanding of essentially of slipping through one place and coming out another.


Scientists have debated for decades whether the propulsion concept known as EmDrive is real or wishful thinking. A sensitive new tool may at last provide an answer.

Oct 19, 2019

Quantum Paradox Experiment May Lead to More Accurate Clocks and Sensors

Posted by in categories: particle physics, quantum physics

More accurate clocks and sensors may result from a recently proposed experiment, linking an Einstein-devised paradox to quantum mechanics. University of Queensland physicist Dr Magdalena Zych said the international collaboration aimed to test Einstein’s twin paradox using quantum particles in a ‘superposition’ state.

Oct 19, 2019

Blanket of light may give better quantum computers

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Quantum mechanics is one of the most successful theories of natural science, and although its predictions are often counterintuitive, not a single experiment has been conducted to date of which the theory has not been able to give an adequate description.

Along with colleagues at bigQ (Center for Macroscopic Quantum States—a Danish National Research Foundation Center of Excellence), center leader Prof. Ulrik Lund Andersen is working on understanding and utilizing .

“The prevailing view among researchers is that is a universally valid theory and therefore also applicable in the macroscopic day-to-day world we normally live in. This also means that it should be possible to observe quantum phenomena on a large scale, and this is precisely what we strive to do in the Danish National Research Foundation Center of Excellence bigQ,” says Lund Andersen.

Oct 19, 2019

Can scientists reverse time with a quantum computer?

Posted by in categories: computing, law, quantum physics

The universe is getting messy. Like a glass shattering to pieces or a single wave crashing onto the shore, the universe’s messiness can only move in one direction – toward more chaos and disorder. But scientists think that, at least for a single electron or the simplest quantum computer, they may be able to turn back time, and restore order to chaos. This doesn’t mean we’ll be visiting with dinosaurs or Napoleon any time soon, but for physicists, the idea that time can run backward at all is still a pretty big deal.

Normally, the universe’s trend toward disorder is a fundamental law: the second law of thermodynamics. It says more formally that any system can only move from more to less ordered, and that the chaos or disorder of a system – its entropy – can never decrease. But an international team of scientists led by researchers at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology think they may have discovered a loophole.

Oct 18, 2019

Quantum spacetime on a quantum simulator

Posted by in categories: computing, engineering, mathematics, nuclear energy, quantum physics

Quantum simulation plays an irreplaceable role in diverse fields, beyond the scope of classical computers. In a recent study, Keren Li and an interdisciplinary research team at the Center for Quantum Computing, Quantum Science and Engineering and the Department of Physics and Astronomy in China, U.S. Germany and Canada. Experimentally simulated spin-network states by simulating quantum spacetime tetrahedra on a four-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum simulator. The experimental fidelity was above 95 percent. The research team used the quantum tetrahedra prepared by nuclear magnetic resonance to simulate a two-dimensional (2-D) spinfoam vertex (model) amplitude, and display local dynamics of quantum spacetime. Li et al. measured the geometric properties of the corresponding quantum tetrahedra to simulate their interactions. The experimental work is an initial attempt and a basic module to represent the Feynman diagram vertex in the spinfoam formulation, to study loop quantum gravity (LQG) using quantum information processing. The results are now available on Communication Physics.

Classical computers cannot study large quantum systems despite successful simulations of a variety of physical systems. The systematic constraints of classical computers occurred when the linear growth of quantum system sizes corresponded to the exponential growth of the Hilbert Space, a mathematical foundation of quantum mechanics. Quantum physicists aim to overcome the issue using quantum computers that process information intrinsically or quantum-mechanically to outperform their classical counterparts exponentially. In 1982, Physicist Richard Feynman defined quantum computers as quantum systems that can be controlled to mimic or simulate the behaviour or properties of relatively less accessible quantum systems.

In the present work, Li et al. used nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a high controllable performance on the quantum system to develop simulation methods. The strategy facilitated the presentation of quantum geometries of space and spacetime based on the analogies between nuclear spin states in NMR samples and spin-network states in quantum gravity. Quantum gravity aims to unite the Einstein gravity with quantum mechanics to expand our understanding of gravity to the Planck scale (1.22 x 1019 GeV). At the Planck scale (magnitudes of space, time and energy) Einstein gravity and the continuum of spacetime breakdown can be replaced via quantum spacetime. Research approaches toward understanding quantum spacetimes are presently rooted in spin networks (a graph of lines and nodes to represent the quantum state of space at a certain point in time), which are an important, non-perturbative framework of quantum gravity.

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