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Archive for the ‘quantum physics’ category

Nov 15, 2017

IBM makes 20 qubit quantum computing machine available as a cloud service

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

IBM has been offering quantum computing as a cloud service since last year when it came out with a 5 qubit version of the advanced computers. Today, the company announced that it’s releasing 20-qubit quantum computers, quite a leap in just 18 months. A qubit is a single unit of quantum information.

The company also announced that IBM researchers had successfully built a 50 qubit prototype, which is the next milestone for quantum computing, but it’s unclear when we will see this commercially available.

While the earliest versions of IBM’s quantum computers were offered for free to build a community of users, and help educate people on programming and using these machines, today’s announcement is the first commercial offering. It will be available by the end of the year.

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Nov 15, 2017

The Quantum Computer Factory That’s Taking on Google and IBM

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Who says Silicon Valley doesn’t fund real technology any more?

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Nov 15, 2017

Why This New Quantum Computing Startup Has a Real Shot at Beating Its Competition

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

A startup called Quantum Circuits plans to compete with the likes of IBM, Google, Microsoft, and Intel to bring quantum computing out of the lab and into the wider world. There’s one good reason to think it might be able to beat them all.

That’s because Quantum Circuits was founded by Robert Schoelkopf, a professor at Yale, whose work in many ways has helped kick-start this exciting new era of quantum advances.

Quantum computers exploit two strange features of quantum physics, entanglement and superposition, to process information in a fundamentally different way from traditional computers. The approach allows the power of such machines to scale dramatically with even just a few quantum bits, or qubits. Those racing to build practical quantum computers are nearing the point where quantum machines will be capable of doing things that no conventional machine could—an inflection point known as quantum supremacy.

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Nov 10, 2017

IBM says it’s reached milestone in quantum computing

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

IBM has announced a milestone in its race against Google and other big tech firms to build a powerful quantum computer.

Dario Gil, who leads IBM’s and artificial intelligence research division, said Friday that the company’s scientists have successfully built and measured a processor prototype with 50 , known as qubits.

Gil says it’s the first time any company has built a quantum computer at this scale.

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Nov 10, 2017

IBM announces a trailblazing quantum machine

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Researchers have built the most sophisticated quantum computer yet, signaling progress toward a powerful new way of processing information.

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Nov 9, 2017

China Has A Breakthrough in Spy-Proof Quantum Communications

Posted by in categories: quantum physics, security

By sending quantum information several kilometers, the researchers took a big step toward the future of information security.

A team of Chinese researchers say they have completed the first long-distance quantum secure direct communication, a critical step toward sending messages that are truly safe from eavesdropping.

The information traveled 2.7 kilometers along a quantum channel, the team said in a paper that was peer-reviewed by China’s Science Bulletin journal and placed online Oct. 22.

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Nov 8, 2017

U.S. officials are having a ‘Sputnik moment’ over AI innovation in China

Posted by in categories: climatology, economics, policy, quantum physics, robotics/AI, security, sustainability

Today’s Sputnik moment is China’s rapid growth as an economic and technological superpower. In 2017 alone, China has outpaced the United States in renewable energy efforts and has become the standard-bearer in combating climate change and advocacy for globalization. Similarly, China is rapidly moving towards taking the lead in technology from the United States and is looking at quantum computing and artificial intelligence as areas for growth to do so.

The Verge recently published an article citing Alphabet chief executive officer Eric Schmidt’s perspective that the United States is falling behind when it comes to research and development in artificial intelligence, particularly compared to the rapid pace of innovation that China has set in the field. Schmidt, who is also the chair of the Defense Innovation Advisory Board, gave those remarks as part of a discussion at The Artificial Intelligence and Global Security Summit held by The Center for a New American Security (CNAS), a nonprofit think tank dedicated to research and analysis on how the United States can make informed policy-making decisions on national security and defense.

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Nov 8, 2017

Quantum security from small satellites

Posted by in categories: quantum physics, satellites, security

Shoebox sized satellites could be the key to fast-track development of space quantum communication.

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Nov 7, 2017

Nottingham’s 3D printed helmet ushers in a new era of natural brain scans

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, neuroscience, quantum physics

“Room temperature quantum sensors can be mounted directly on the scalp of any subject. This will give us a projected four-fold increase in sensitivity for adults, but the sensitivity could potentially be up to a 15 or 20 fold increase for children or babies.”


A £1.6 million collaborative project between scientists at the University of Nottingham and University College London (UCL) is looking to improve the way we map the human brain. Focusing on the development of magnetoencephalography (MEG), researchers have 3D printed a prototype helmet that may yield quadruple the sensitivity of current MEG devices.

Reading at room temperature

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Nov 2, 2017

Theoretical Physicists Are Getting Closer to Explaining How NASA’s ‘Impossible’ EmDrive Works

Posted by in categories: quantum physics, space travel

The EmDrive propulsion system might be able to take us to the stars, but first it must be reconciled with the laws of physics.

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