Blog

Archive for the ‘government’ category

Oct 23, 2019

The transhumanists ‘upgrading’ their bodies

Posted by in categories: computing, government, transhumanism

Dr Neal also said there were safety risks with people buying the equipment from online sites and doing the procedures from home.

The Scottish government told BBC Scotland’s The Nine it intended to regulate procedures carried out by non-healthcare professionals and it was consulting on how this could be done.


Meet the people seeking to improve their bodies by implanting technology such as microchips.

Oct 22, 2019

Without encryption we will lose all privacy. This is our new battleground

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, government, security, surveillance

And yet, in the midst of the greatest computer security crisis in history, the US government, along with the governments of the UK and Australia, is attempting to undermine the only method that currently exists for reliably protecting the world’s information: encryption. Should they succeed in their quest to undermine encryption, our public infrastructure and private lives will be rendered permanently unsafe.


The US, UK and Australia are taking on Facebook in a bid to undermine the only method that protects our personal information.

• Edward Snowden is a US surveillance whistleblower.

Continue reading “Without encryption we will lose all privacy. This is our new battleground” »

Oct 15, 2019

Undeclared Wars in Cyberspace Are Becoming More Aggressive and Automated

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, government

“Access to the power grid that is obtained now could be used to shut something important down in the future when we are in a war,” White noted. “Espionage is part of the whole program. It is important to remember that cyber has just provided a new domain in which to conduct the types of activities we have been doing in the real world for years.”

The US is also beginning to pour more money into cybersecurity. The 2020 fiscal budget calls for spending $17.4 billion throughout the government on cyber-related activities, with the Department of Defense (DoD) alone earmarked for $9.6 billion.

Despite the growing emphasis on cybersecurity in the US and around the world, the demand for skilled security professionals is well outpacing the supply, with a projected shortfall of nearly three million open or unfilled positions according to the non-profit IT security organization (ISC)².

Oct 15, 2019

“Metabesity and Longevity: USA Special Case Study” is an 85-page open-access analytical report produced jointly

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, government, life extension, policy, robotics/AI

By and Targeting Metabesity to examine the links between metabesity, Longevity and the USA’s current health shortfalls, including low health-adjusted life expectancy (“HALE”) and the large gap between HALE and life expectancy, despite its extremely high per-capita healthcare expenditures, and to chart policy recommendations to neutralize this vast health vs wealth deficit.


€œMetabesity and Longevity: USA Special Case Study € is an 85-page open-access analytical report produced jointly by Aging Analytics Agency and Targeting Metabesity to examine the links between metabesity, Longevity and the USA €™s current health shortfalls, including low health-adjusted life expectancy ( €œHALE €) and the large gap between HALE and life expectancy, despite its extremely high per-capita healthcare expenditures, and to chart policy recommendations to neutralize this vast health vs wealth deficit.

Link to Special Case Study: https://aginganalytics.com/longevity-usa/

Continue reading “‘Metabesity and Longevity: USA Special Case Study’ is an 85-page open-access analytical report produced jointly” »

Oct 12, 2019

These clothes use outlandish designs to trick facial recognition software into thinking you’re not a human

Posted by in categories: government, mobile phones, robotics/AI, security

Smile! You’re on camera — or you were at some point in the past few years — and now your face is public domain.

Facial recognition technology is everywhere, and only becoming more pervasive. It’s marketed as a security feature by companies like Apple and Google to prevent strangers from unlocking your iPhone or front door.

It’s also used by government agencies like police departments. More than half of adult Americans’ faces are logged in police databases, according to a study by Georgetown researchers. Facial recognition technology is used by governments across the globe to identify and track dissidents, and has been deployed by police against Hong Kong protesters.

Oct 10, 2019

France Set to Roll Out Nationwide Facial Recognition ID Program

Posted by in categories: finance, government, robotics/AI, security

With the move, France will join states around the world rushing to create “digital identities” to give citizens secure access to everything from their taxes and banks to social security and utility bills. Singapore uses facial recognition and has signed an accord to help the U.K. prepare its own ID system. India uses iris scans.


France is poised to become the first European country to use facial recognition technology to give citizens a secure digital identity — whether they want it or not.

Saying it wants to make the state more efficient, President Emmanuel Macron’s government is pushing through plans to roll out an ID program, dubbed Alicem, in November, earlier than an initial Christmas target. The country’s data regulator says the program breaches the European rule of consent and a privacy group is challenging it in France’s highest administrative court. It took a hacker just over an hour to break into a “secure” government messaging app this year, raising concerns about the state’s security standards.

Continue reading “France Set to Roll Out Nationwide Facial Recognition ID Program” »

Oct 9, 2019

Ambassador Juan José Gómez Camacho — Mexico’s Ambassador to Canada — Migrant Health, Pandemics, and Aging — IdeaXme — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, geopolitics, governance, government, health, law, policy, science, strategy, sustainability

Oct 8, 2019

The US just blacklisted 8 Chinese AI firms. It could be what China’s AI industry needs

Posted by in categories: business, government, policy, robotics/AI

The US Commerce Department has said it is adding 28 Chinese government organizations and private businesses, including eight tech giants, to its so-called Entity List for acting against American foreign policy interests.

What does that mean? The move effectively bars any US companies from selling technology to the blacklisted firms and organizations without US government approval.

Why? The US says they have been involved in human rights violations against Uighurs and other predominantly Muslim ethnic minorities in the Xinjiang region.

Oct 8, 2019

Blue Origin is outpacing SpaceX in hiring as NASA contracts roll in, but not for long

Posted by in categories: Elon Musk, government, space travel

When Elon Musk announced the launch of SpaceX ($SPACEX) in 2002, comparisons to Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin ($BLUEORIGIN) surfaced seemingly within seconds, and a private space war was born. As both companies engage in their own space race, and compete for private and government launch contracts, they’ve both been on hiring sprees virtually since the day they were born.

Blue Origin’s head start remains intact, and is manifested in its hiring patterns that have shown the company adding more people at any one time than SpaceX. But that lead, at least according to trends we’re now seeing with enough data, may end in the next year or two.

Oct 6, 2019

UPS wins approval to operate nationwide fleet of drones

Posted by in categories: drones, government

Delivery service UPS won the federal government’s first full approval to operate a fleet of drones. It marks a milestone in the race to commercial drone delivery.

Page 1 of 8812345678Last