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Archive for the ‘government’ category

Nov 14, 2018

Google went down after traffic was routed through China and Russia

Posted by in category: government

Google’s services went down for an hour yesterday after its IP addresses were routed way from normal paths to Nigeria, China and Russia. Google told Ars Technica it doubted the leak was malicious, despite the fact that government-owned China Telecom was recently caught routing Western carrier traffic through mainland China. Some of Google’s most sensitive data, including its corporate WAN infrastructure and VPN, were reportedly redirected.

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Nov 14, 2018

Bullets that don’t miss, weaponized insects and more: Innovations from DARPA, America’s secret lab

Posted by in categories: government, military, robotics/AI

Bullets that never miss, super soldiers with extreme strength and robot warriors capable of rising up against humans may sound like the stuff of science fiction… but the truth is that they have all already been developed.

A top-secret US government body called the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is behind these space-age innovations, which it has developed as part of its mission to revolutionize the way America fights the wars of the future. (Just think of Q’s lab in James Bond, but for the US army).

Ever since it was established in 1958, DARPA has been the subject of conspiracy theories claiming — among other things — that the agency was covering up UFO landings, trying to develop mind control and working on Earth-shattering super-weapons like death rays.

Continue reading “Bullets that don’t miss, weaponized insects and more: Innovations from DARPA, America’s secret lab” »

Nov 11, 2018

The US just elected 9 new scientists to Congress, including an ocean expert, a nurse, and a biochemist. Here’s the full list

Posted by in category: government

The faces of Capitol Hill are changing.

When the 116th Congress heads to Washington in January, there will be a record number of women in the ranks — at least 123, according to the news website Axios, including the first Muslim women, the first Somali-American, and the first Native American women.

There will be more scientists too.

Continue reading “The US just elected 9 new scientists to Congress, including an ocean expert, a nurse, and a biochemist. Here’s the full list” »

Nov 9, 2018

Press is one industry that cannot be replaced by AI — its sole purpose is to report what government won’t tell us… Humans may or may not do that

Posted by in categories: government, robotics/AI

Preprogrammed AI definitely won’t.

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Nov 8, 2018

How science fared in the midterm elections

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, engineering, government, science

This year, more candidates with degrees in science, medicine and engineering ran for Congress than ever before. Of the nearly two-dozen new candidates in this crop, at least seven won seats in the House of Representatives.


This year, scientists, doctors and engineers ran for office like never before. Here’s how they did.

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Nov 3, 2018

Slightly heavier than a toothpick, the first wireless insect-size robot takes flight

Posted by in categories: drones, government, military, robotics/AI

With the rapid advances in drone technology spanning the 20th century, it should come as no surprise that miniature flying robots are on the horizon: Between now and 2020, Goldman Sachs’ forecasts a $100 billion market opportunity for drones, helped by growing demand from the commercial and civil government sectors.

What is surprising is that it has taken researchers more than two decades to finally come up with a fully autonomous version. That’s because the electronics needed to power and control the wings were so heavy that, until now, flying robotic insects had to be tethered to a wire attached to an external power source.

Yet a team of engineers at the University of Washington, led by assistant professor Sawyer Fuller, were able to figure it out. Relying on funding from UW, they created RoboFly, a robo-insect powered by an invisible laser beam that is pointed at a photovoltaic cell, which is attached above the robot and converts the laser light into enough electricity to operate its wings.

Continue reading “Slightly heavier than a toothpick, the first wireless insect-size robot takes flight” »

Nov 1, 2018

Will we all be using a blockchain currency some day?

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, cryptocurrencies, economics, government

At Quora.com, I respond to quetions on Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency. Today, a reader asked “Will we all be using a blockchain-based currency some day?”.

This is an easy question to answer, but not for usual Geeky reasons: A capped supply, redundant bookkeeping, privacy & liberty or blind passion. No, these are all tangential reasons. But first, let’s be clear about the answer:

Yes, Virginia. We are all destined to move,
eventually, to a blockchain based currency.

I am confident of this because of one enormous benefit that trumps all other considerations. Also, because of flawed arguments behind perceived negatives.

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Oct 29, 2018

DJI’s new drone features swappable search and rescue accessories

Posted by in categories: business, drones, government

DJI is taking one of its newest drones and turning it into something small businesses and government agencies might want to use. The Chinese drone maker just announced the Mavic 2 Enterprise — a modular $1,999 version of the Mavic 2 Zoom — that is better suited for tasks like inspection or search and rescue.

Mavic 2 Enterprise comes with three different accessories. There’s a 2,400-lumen spotlight, a 100-decibel speaker, and a flashing strobe. The loudspeaker allows operators to remotely blast up to 10 custom recordings, and the strobe is visible from three miles away. DJI says the accessories help move its products “beyond imaging” and “into configurable platforms that enhance aerial productivity.”

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Oct 26, 2018

‘We have a duty to act’: hundreds ready to go to jail over climate crisis

Posted by in categories: climatology, government

👀


Rowan Williams backs call for mass civil disobedience ‘to bypass the government’s inaction and defend life itself’

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Oct 25, 2018

China: facial recognition and state control | The Economist

Posted by in categories: government, privacy, robotics/AI, security, surveillance, transportation

Whether it’s left there or right here… the tactics and destination look pretty much the same to me…


China is the world leader in facial recognition technology. Discover how the country is using it to develop a vast hyper-surveillance system able to monitor and target its ethnic minorities, including the Muslim Uighur population.

Continue reading “China: facial recognition and state control | The Economist” »

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