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Archive for the ‘time travel’ category

Feb 24, 2018

Physicists Have Confirmed a Pear-Shaped Nucleus, And It Could Ruin Time Travel Forever

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics, space travel, time travel

Physicists have confirmed the existence of a new form of atomic nuclei, and the fact that it’s not symmetrical challenges the fundamental theories of physics that explain our Universe.

But that’s not as bad as it sounds, because the 2016 discovery could help scientists solve one of the biggest mysteries in theoretical physics — where is all the dark matter? — and could also explain why travelling backwards in time might actually be impossible.

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Nov 16, 2017

Traveling back in time could be possible, physicist says

Posted by in categories: cosmology, particle physics, robotics/AI, time travel, transportation

As the common tropes of science fiction continue to break out into reality, from humanoid robots to self-driving cars, there’s one concept that has seemingly remained beyond our grasp: time travel.

But, jumping through time might not be impossible, after all, according to one astrophysicist.

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Sep 28, 2017

Traversable acausal retrograde domains in spacetime

Posted by in category: time travel

This was the second scholarly paper i saw this year about time travel. Posting because there isn’t nearly enough serious interest about Time Travel in the science community.

Traversable acausal retrograde domains in spacetime.
Benjamin K Tippett1 and David Tsang2
Published 31 March 2017 •

Abstract
In this paper we present geometry which has been designed to fit a layperson’s description of a ‘time machine’. It is a box which allows those within it to travel backwards and forwards through time and space, as interpreted by an external observer. Timelike observers travel within the interior of a ‘bubble’ of geometry which moves along a circular, acausal trajectory through spacetime. If certain timelike observers inside the bubble maintain a persistent acceleration, their worldlines will close.

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Sep 7, 2017

Unexpected Futurist: Ben Franklin envisions 2776 — and Cryonics

Posted by in categories: aging, cryonics, education, entertainment, futurism, health, human trajectories, innovation, media & arts, science, time travel

In Unexpected Futurist, we profile the lesser known futurist side of influential individuals. This episode’s unexpected time-traveler: Benjamin Franklin. Ben Franklin was an inventor, observer, electricity pioneer, and serial experimenter, so it’s not entirely surprising he looked to the future. But it turns out he was looking to the far, far future. In 1780 he wrote a letter to a friend in which he lamented that he was born during the dawn of science.

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May 15, 2017

Ageing has its good sides

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, life extension, time travel

Sometimes, albeit rarely, people object to rejuvenation biotechnologies saying that ageing has its pluses too, thus subtly implying that we should leave it alone in order not to lose these pluses. The thing is, they’re not talking about the same kind of ageing that science is trying to undo. They’re mixing up chronological and biological ageing, and they’re not at all the same thing.


This objection is very simple to explain and even simpler to dismantle, because it boils down to a gross misunderstanding.

Whoever raises this objection generally says that with ageing comes experience, that later in life people are generally happier, more accomplished, and so on. I have nothing to object to that, except that all those nice things are a (possible) consequence of chronological ageing, most definitely not of biological ageing. It is not very often that people mix the two up, but at times they do, so let us clarify once and for all what the difference is.

Chronological ageing is nothing more, nothing less than the passing of time. Becoming chronologically older simply means that the time you’ve existed for is getting longer. There’s nothing wrong with it, and no one (to my knowledge) wants to stop, ‘cure’, or reverse chronological ageing—especially because that would be a bit complicated to do and it would have annoying side-effects, such as time freezing or rewinding your life back to your elementary school years, possibly dragging the entire universe along, and would do nothing to eliminate the ill health of old age. Doesn’t sound like a lot of fun—and I speak as a chap with a thing for time travel.

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May 10, 2017

New Research Shows That Time Travel Is Mathematically Possible

Posted by in categories: mathematics, time travel

We have the math locked down. Next, we need the materials.

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Apr 30, 2017

Time travel is ‘possible’ — mathematically anyway

Posted by in categories: materials, time travel

A researcher crunches the numbers on time travel using his own TARDIS. Also, a weird new material could be the real-world version of a flux capacitor.

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Apr 28, 2017

Physicists Just Came Up With a Mathematical Model for a Viable Time Machine

Posted by in categories: mathematics, physics, time travel

Physicists have come up with what they claim is a mathematical model of a theoretical “time machine” — a box that can move backwards and forwards through time and space.

The trick, they say, is to use the curvature of space-time in the Universe to bend time into a circle for hypothetical passengers sitting in the box, and that circle allows them to skip into the future and the past.

“People think of time travel as something as fiction. And we tend to think it’s not possible because we don’t actually do it,” says theoretical physicist and mathematician, Ben Tippett, from the University of British Columbia in Canada.

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Mar 10, 2017

Superhero Plan to Time Travel in Large Hadron Collider Just Might Work

Posted by in categories: energy, physics, time travel

A universe-opening theory suggested in issue 3 of the Justice League/Power Rangers comic book series has roots in real physics.

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Feb 14, 2017

The Island of Dr. Moreau For Real

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cyborgs, health, space, time travel

By Drs. David Niesel and Norbert Herzog, Medical Discovery News

H.G. Wells was a writer of fantastic science fiction during the 1890s. He is considered one of the fathers of science fiction and wrote novels whose stories remain popular today. He wrote about time travel in “The Time Machine”, about interplanetary conflict originally made popular by the Orson Wells’ “The War of the Worlds” and in “The Island of Dr. Moreau” he described beings that were part human and part animal. Two of the three remain pure science fiction but one is on the verge of becoming a reality. Do you know which one?

In August, 2016, the National Institutes of Health announced that it was lifting its ban on research that introduces stem cells from humans into animal embryos. Stem cells have the ability to evolve into any human cell and can grow into any human tissue. The goal of this type of research is to grow human tissues and eventually human replacement organs in animals. What an innovative way to improve upon transplantation medicine! But to realize this potential, we would create an organism that is part animal and part human! These hybrids are the stuff of ancient mythology. These mixtures of different animals are called chimeras after the mythical ancient Greek creature that was part lion, snake and goat. One goal of today’s research is to produce tissues and organs for experimentation that will improve our understanding of human disease. An alternative and longer term goal would be to produce organs directly for human transplantation.

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