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Archive for the ‘encryption’ category

Aug 28, 2020

DARPA Launches Project CHARIOT in Bid to Shield Big Tech Profits

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, internet, military, quantum physics

DARPA announces a new type of cryptography to protect the Big Tech firm profits from the dawn of quantum computers and allow backdoor access into 3 trillion internet-connected devices.

by Raul Diego

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Aug 24, 2020

New Bluetooth Vulnerability: Hackers Could Spy on You

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, encryption, mobile phones

O,.o.


Millions of us use Bluetooth wireless communications every day—to make phone calls when driving, with our fitness trackers, streaming at work or play. Innocent enough, seemingly. But no technology comes without a warning: a recently discovered Bluetooth vulnerability allows hackers to spy on your conversations or take control of your smart phone. The vulnerability deals with the encryption between two devices. It even has a name—a KNOB hack (Key Negotiation Of Bluetooth).

This is not the first time Bluetooth has been hacked and it likely won’t be the last. And this one has its limitations. To take advantage of the KNOB vulnerability the hacker has to be in close proximity of your phone. There is also currently no evidence that this vulnerability has been exploited maliciously.

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Aug 14, 2020

Chinese Scientists Figured Out How to Beam Quantum Messages From Satellites

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, encryption, quantum physics, satellites

Safe Messaging

Cybersecurity experts have long warned that quantum computers, whenever it is that they become useful, will render useless most conventional forms of encryption. This new satellite experiment, which is described in research published in the journal Nature, suggests that it may be possible to send secure messages yet.

“A remarkable feature of the entanglement-based quantum cryptography as we demonstrated here is that such security is ensured even if the satellite is controlled by an adversary,” University of Science and Technology physicist Jian-Wei Pan told Space.com.

Jul 20, 2020

Google Cloud announces enhanced Confidential Computing

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, security

Amid ever-increasing demands for privacy and security for highly sensitive data stored in the cloud, Google Cloud announced this week the creation of Confidential Computing.

Terming it a “,” Google said the technology, which will offer a number of products in the coming months, allows users to encrypt not only as it is stored or sent to the cloud, but while it is being worked on as well.

Confidential Computing keeps data encrypted as it’s being “used, indexed, queried, or trained on” in memory and “elsewhere outside the central processing unit,” Google said in a statement about the new technology.

Jul 18, 2020

Trust Stamp integrating biometric hash solution with Mastercard on children’s vaccine record system

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cybercrime/malcode, encryption, privacy

Digital identity capabilities from Trust Stamp are now being integrated with Mastercard’s Wellness Pass solution, which it will launch in cooperation with Gavi in West Africa. Proving identity without revealing any information about it is the idea behind Trust Stamp’s zero knowledge approach to online identity verification, according to a profile by Mastercard.

Gareth Genner, Trust Stamp co-founder and CEO, explains in an interview how the company’s Evergreen Hash technology uses biometrics without taking on the risk of spoofing or a data breach that he says come with standard biometric implementations.

The Evergreen Hash is created from the customers face, palm or fingerprint biometrics, which the company uses to generate a “3D mask,” discarding raw data and adding encryption to associate the data with the user.

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Jul 17, 2020

Rsearchers suggest modification of quantum encryption system with compact detector

Posted by in categories: encryption, finance, military, quantum physics

A new system can significantly lower the production costs costs of mass quantum key distribution (QKD) networks, which will make them available to a wider user audience. This will make it possible to use QDK in the regular fiber-optic cable infrastructure. The paper was published in Scientific Reports.

Many have heard about quantum key distribution (QKD), which is also sometimes referred to as quantum encryption. Today, this is one of the safest ways to encode information that can then be used by major banks, military and governmental organizations. In a QDK system, the information is transmitted by quantum radiation, which is extremely hard for eavesdroppers to intercept.

“As a rule, QKD uses a weak laser light with an average number of photons less than unity,” explains Eduard Samsonov, a research associate at ITMO’s Faculty of Photonics and Optical Information. “This light has fundamental special features, the so-called quantum effects that leave no chance for a third party to infiltrate the channel to read the information without being noticed.”

Jul 13, 2020

Tiny bubbles make a quantum leap

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, engineering, quantum physics

July 13, 2020—Researchers at Columbia Engineering and Montana State University report today that they have found that placing sufficient strain in a 2-D material—tungsten diselenide (WSe2)—creates localized states that can yield single-photon emitters. Using sophisticated optical microscopy techniques developed at Columbia over the past three years, the team was able to directly image these states for the first time, revealing that even at room temperature they are highly tunable and act as quantum dots, tightly confined pieces of semiconductors that emit light.

“Our discovery is very exciting, because it means we can now position a emitter wherever we want, and tune its properties, such as the color of the emitted photon, simply by bending or straining the material at a specific location,” says James Schuck, associate professor of mechanical engineering, who co-led the study published today by Nature Nanotechnology. “Knowing just where and how to tune the single-photon is essential to creating quantum optical circuitry for use in quantum computers, or even in so-called ‘quantum’ simulators that mimic physical phenomena far too complex to model with today’s computers.”

Developing such as quantum computers and quantum sensors is a rapidly developing field of research as researchers figure out how to use the unique properties of quantum physics to create devices that can be much more efficient, faster, and more sensitive than existing technologies. For instance, quantum information—think encrypted messages—would be much more secure.

Jul 9, 2020

Researchers determine how to accurately pinpoint malicious drone operators

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, drones, encryption, robotics/AI

Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) have determined how to pinpoint the location of a drone operator who may be operating maliciously or harmfully near airports or protected airspace by analyzing the flight path of the drone.

Drones (small commercial unmanned ) pose significant security risks due to their agility, accessibility and low cost. As a result, there is a growing need to develop methods for detection, localization and mitigation of malicious and other harmful aircraft operation.

The paper, which was led by senior lecturer and expert Dr. Gera Weiss from BGU’s Department of Computer Science, was presented at the Fourth International Symposium on Cyber Security, Cryptography and Machine Learning (CSCML 2020) on July 3rd.

Jul 6, 2020

Why your privacy could be threatened by a bill to protect children

Posted by in categories: encryption, security

Backers of the EARN IT Act focus on protecting children from being exploited, but security experts say the bill actually chips away at your encrypted messages.

Jun 27, 2020

Physicists Just Quantum Teleported Information Between Particles of Matter

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, quantum physics

By making use of the ‘spooky’ laws behind quantum entanglement, physicists think have found a way to make information leap between a pair of electrons separated by distance.

Teleporting fundamental states between photons – massless particles of light – is quickly becoming old news, a trick we are still learning to exploit in computing and encrypted communications technology.

But what the latest research has achieved is quantum teleportation between particles of matter – electrons –something that could help connect quantum computing with the more traditional electronic kind.

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