Blog

Archive for the ‘encryption’ category

Oct 11, 2019

Quantum Teleportation on the Nanoscale Using a Chemical Reaction

Posted by in categories: chemistry, computing, encryption, nanotechnology, quantum physics

A team of Northwestern University researchers is the first to document the role chemistry will play in next generation computing and communication. By applying their expertise to the field of Quantum Information Science (QIS), they discovered how to move quantum information on the nanoscale through quantum teleportation—an emerging topic within the field of QIS. Their findings were published in the journal, Nature Chemistry, on September 23, 2019, and have untold potential to influence future research and application.

Quantum teleportation allows for the transfer of quantum information from one location to another, in addition to a more secure delivery of that information through significantly improved encryption.

The QIS field of research has long been the domain of physicists, and only in the past decade has drawn the attention and involvement of chemists who have applied their expertise to exploit the quantum nature of molecules for QIS applications.

Oct 11, 2019

Researchers discover material that could someday power quantum computer

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, quantum physics

Quantum computers with the ability to perform complex calculations, encrypt data more securely and more quickly predict the spread of viruses, may be within closer reach thanks to a new discovery by Johns Hopkins researchers.

“We’ve found that a certain contains special properties that could be the for technology of the future,” says Yufan Li, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Physics & Astronomy at The Johns Hopkins University and the paper’s first author.

The findings will be published October 11 in Science.

Sep 22, 2019

Mike Adams: Google Close To Cracking All Cryptocurrency With 256 Bit Encryption, Including Bitcoin…US Military Secrets Also Breakable

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, cryptocurrencies, encryption, military

Other companies are even closer than Google, and it’s about more than just cracking cryptocurrency. Mike has the details in this breaking report…

Sep 16, 2019

Was SHA-256 cracked? Don’t buy into retraction!

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, cryptocurrencies, encryption, government, hacking, internet, mathematics, military, privacy, security, software

SHA-256 is a one way hashing algorithm. Cracking it would have tectonic implications for consumers, business and all aspects of government including the military.

It’s not the purpose of this post to explain encryption, AES or SHA-256, but here is a brief description of SHA-256. Normally, I place reference links in-line or at the end of a post. But let’s get this out of the way up front:

One day after Treadwell Stanton DuPont claimed that a secret project cracked SHA-256 more than one year ago, they back-tracked. Rescinding the original claim, they announced that an equipment flaw caused them to incorrectly conclude that they had algorithmically cracked SHA-256.

All sectors can still sleep quietly tonight,” said CEO Mike Wallace. “Preliminary results in this cryptanalytic research led us to believe we were successful, but this flaw finally proved otherwise.

Continue reading “Was SHA-256 cracked? Don’t buy into retraction!” »

Sep 13, 2019

Hacking at Quantum Speed with Shor’s Algorithm

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, encryption, information science, quantum physics

X.x.


Classical computers struggle to crack modern encryption. But quantum computers using Shor’s Algorithm make short work of RSA cryptography. Find out how.

Sep 12, 2019

The World’s First Photo of Quantum Entanglement Could Disprove Einstein’s Theory

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, quantum physics

Einstein dubbed the idea of quantum entanglement as “spooky action at a distance.” Now for the first time ever, scientists have taken a picture of it.
» Subscribe to Seeker!http://bit.ly/subscribeseeker
» Watch more Elements! http://bit.ly/ElementsPlaylist

Today we understand quantum entanglement as when a pair of particles that cross paths and interact with each other can become connected and stay that way, even when the particles are spaced very far apart.

Continue reading “The World’s First Photo of Quantum Entanglement Could Disprove Einstein’s Theory” »

Sep 10, 2019

Quantum Physics Protects Data From Cyberattack Over Standard Telecom Networks

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, encryption, quantum physics

Quantum Xchange uses quantum technology to guard encryption keys.

Sep 7, 2019

Dave Bacon: Google Quantum Computing Beyond Swag

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, quantum physics

A talk by Dave Bacon during the Industry session of the 14th Conference on the Theory of Quantum Computation, Communication and Cryptography (TQC 2019), Day 3. TQC 2019 was hosted June 3–5, 2019 by the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science at the University of Maryland (QuICS). More information about TQC can be found at https://www.tqcconference.org.

Sep 6, 2019

How the United States Is Developing Post-Quantum Cryptography

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, government, information science, internet, quantum physics, security

When practical quantum computing finally arrives, it will have the power to crack the standard digital codes that safeguard online privacy and security for governments, corporations, and virtually everyone who uses the Internet. That’s why a U.S. government agency has challenged researchers to develop a new generation of quantum-resistant cryptographic algorithms.

Many experts don ’t expect a quantum computer capable of performing the complex calculations required to crack modern cryptography standards to become a reality within the next 10 years. But the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) wants to stay ahead by getting new cryptographic standards ready by 2022. The agency is overseeing the second phase of its Post-Quantum Cryptography Standardization Process to narrow down the best candidates for quantum-resistant algorithms that can replace modern cryptography.

“Currently intractable computational problems that protect widely-deployed cryptosystems, such as RSA and Elliptic Curve-based schemes, are expected to become solvable,” says Rafael Misoczki, a cryptographer at the Intel Corporation and a member of two teams (named Bike and Classic McEliece) involved in the NIST process. “This means that quantum computers have the potential to eventually break most secure communications on the planet.”

Sep 5, 2019

New technology allows software components to be isolated from each other with little computation

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, encryption, internet

Safeguarding passwords, credit card numbers or cryptographic keys in computer programs will require less computational work in the future. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Software Systems in Kaiserslautern and Saarbrücken have come up with a new technology called ERIM to isolate software components from each other. This allows sensitive data to be protected from hackers when the data is processed by online services, for example. The new method has three to five times less computational overhead than the previous best isolation technology, making it more practical for online services to use the technology. This was reason enough for USENIX, a US-American computing systems association, and Facebook to award their 2019 Internet Defense Prize to the researchers.

Computer programs are like a fortress. Just as a fortress is protected by thick walls, moats and iron gates, firewalls and other security technologies prevent cyber criminals from maliciously exploiting apps. And just as one poorly guarded gate or a supposedly secret escape tunnel may allow besiegers to capture a castle, all hackers need is a small security gap to gain access to all components of a software. In the worst case, they can then get their hands on the data that grants them access to or even allow them to make credit card payments. For example, the Heartbleed bug in the widely used OpenSSL encryption software made user names and passwords of various and programs vulnerable to hackers.

Page 1 of 2712345678Last