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Archive for the ‘cosmology’ category

Nov 12, 2018

Scientists predict a ‘dark matter hurricane’ will collide with the Earth

Posted by in categories: climatology, cosmology, particle physics

Yes, here’s the story of the dark matter hurricane — a cosmic event that may provide our first glimpse of the mysterious, invisible particle.

    by

  • Jackson Ryan

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Nov 10, 2018

Scientists Now Believe That The Universe Itself Is Conscious

Posted by in categories: cosmology, neuroscience

I think aspects of our Universe are conscious. Dark matter or the æther perhaps. Stagnancy is death so change inherently means something is making decisions.


A new scientific concept has recently come to light, which scientists are calling “panpsychism.” Panpsychism says that the universe could be capable of consciousness, which could change everything.

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Nov 8, 2018

Quantum systems: Same, but different

Posted by in categories: cosmology, particle physics, quantum physics

Remarkable rules have been detected in the apparent chaos of disequilibrium processes. Different systems behave identically in many ways, if they belong to the same “universality class.” This means that experiments can be carried out with quantum systems that are easy to handle in order to obtain precise information about systems that cannot be directly studied in the experiment—such as the Big Bang.

Some phenomena are so complicated that it is impossible to precisely calculate them. This includes large , which consist of many particles, particularly when they are not in an equilibrium state, but changing rapidly. Such examples include the wild particle inferno that occurs in particle accelerators when large collide, or conditions just after the Big Bang, when particles rapidly expanded and then cooled.

At TU Wien and Heidelberg University, remarkable rules have been detected in the apparent chaos of disequilibrium processes. This indicates that such processes can be divided into universality classes. Systems belonging to the same class behave identically in many ways. This means that experiments can be carried out with systems that are easy to handle in order to obtain precise information about other systems that cannot be directly studied in the experiment. These findings have since been published in the journal Nature.

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Nov 8, 2018

Ripples in Space-Time Could Reveal the Shape of Wormholes

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics

Wormholes — yawning gateways that could theoretically connect distant points in space-time — are usually illustrated as gaping gravity wells linked by a narrow tunnel.

But their precise shape has been unknown.

Now, however, a physicist in Russia has devised a method to measure the shape of symmetric wormholes — even though they have not been proven to exist — based on the way the objects may affect light and gravity. [8 Ways You Can See Einstein’s Theory of Relativity in Real Life].

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Nov 7, 2018

When Galaxies Merge, The Black Holes In Their Hearts Fuse Together

Posted by in categories: cosmology, futurism

Yeah, it sounds goth, but it could explain the enormous size of certain black holes.


In the distant future, our own galaxy could join hearts with its galactic neighbor Andromeda.

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Nov 7, 2018

At Last, Physicists Understand Where Matter’s Mass Comes From

Posted by in categories: cosmology, education, particle physics, supercomputing

Lattice QCD is not only teaching us how the strong interactions lead to the overwhelming majority of the mass of normal matter in our Universe, but holds the potential to teach us about all sorts of other phenomena, from nuclear reactions to dark matter.

Later today, November 7th, physics professor Phiala Shanahan will be delivering a public lecture from Perimeter Institute, and we&s;ll be live-blogging it right here at 7 PM ET / 4 PM PT. You can watch the talk right here, and follow along with my commentary below. Shanahan is an expert in theoretical nuclear and particle physics and specializes in supercomputer work involving QCD, and I&s;m so curious what else she has to say.

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Nov 7, 2018

Astronomers discover new luminous high-redshift quasar

Posted by in categories: cosmology, evolution

An international team of astronomers has detected a new luminous quasar at a redshift of 7.02. The newly found quasi-stellar object (QSO), designated DELS J003836.10–152723.6, is the most luminous quasar known at a redshift of over 7.0. The discovery is reported in a paper published October 29 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

Powered by the most , bright at high redshift are important for astronomers as they are perceived as the brightest beacons highlighting the chemical evolution of the universe most effectively. They are the most luminous and most distant, compact objects in the observable universe and their spectrum can be used, for instance, to estimate the mass of supermassive (SMBHs).

However, QSOs are extremely rare and difficult to find. So far, only two quasars with redshifts over 7.0 have been identified. This limits our understanding of SMBH growth mechanism and reionization history.

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Nov 5, 2018

Astronomers Once Watched a Star Turn Directly into a Black Hole

Posted by in category: cosmology

History is full of forgotten heroes. Sometimes that’s because somebody else got credit for their work. Sometimes it’s because they were women in a male-dominated world. And sometimes it’s because a couple of continents *cough* Western society *cough* decided they didn’t want to include them in the history books. Meet Ibn al-Haytham — the guy who basically invented Science with a capital S.

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Nov 4, 2018

The Big Bang Wasn’t The Beginning, After All

Posted by in category: cosmology

In the beginning, there was light, and matter, and antimatter, in an expanding and cooling Universe. But something else happened before.

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Nov 2, 2018

Zoom Into the Black Hole at the Center of the Milky Way

Posted by in category: cosmology

Scientists just further confirmed what has long been believed: that there’s a supermassive black hole scientists named Sagittarius A* at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. This mind-blowing 1.5-minute video zooms in from a wide view of the night sky into the tiny little area where the latest telescopic observations were just made.

In a paper published on October 31st, 2018, scientists at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) detailed how they used the GRAVITY interferometer and the four telescopes of the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to create a virtual telescope that effectively has a diameter of 427 feet (130m).

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