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Archive for the ‘architecture’ category

Apr 7, 2017

Disaster Assistance Handbook | Third Edition, March 2017 | The American Institute of Architects (AIA)

Posted by in categories: architecture, engineering, environmental, governance

“This handbook will:

  • help architects better understand their role and how to prepare for and respond to disasters
  • prepare AIA Component staff to engage and coordinate their architect members and provide community discourse and assistance
  • explain how built environment professionals can work with architects and the community on disaster response and preparedness efforts
  • inform municipal governments of the unique ways architects assist the public and their clients in mitigating, responding to and recovering from disasters”

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Jun 28, 2016

How VR Gaming will Wake Us Up to our Fake Worlds

Posted by in categories: architecture, augmented reality, economics, entertainment, ethics, futurism, holograms, homo sapiens, internet, journalism, philosophy, posthumanism, virtual reality

Human civilization has always been a virtual reality. At the onset of culture, which was propagated through the proto-media of cave painting, the talking drum, music, fetish art making, oral tradition and the like, Homo sapiens began a march into cultural virtual realities, a march that would span the entirety of the human enterprise. We don’t often think of cultures as virtual realities, but there is no more apt descriptor for our widely diverse sociological organizations and interpretations than the metaphor of the “virtual reality.” Indeed, the virtual reality metaphor encompasses the complete human project.

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Virtual Reality researchers, Jim Blascovich and Jeremy Bailenson, write in their book Infinite Reality; “[Cave art] is likely the first animation technology”, where it provided an early means of what they refer to as “virtual travel”. You are in the cave, but the media in that cave, the dynamic-drawn, fire-illuminated art, represents the plains and animals outside—a completely different environment, one facing entirely the opposite direction, beyond the mouth of the cave. When surrounded by cave art, alive with movement from flickering torches, you are at once inside the cave itself whilst the media experience surrounding you encourages you to indulge in fantasy, and to mentally simulate an entirely different environment. Blascovich and Bailenson suggest that in terms of the evolution of media technology, this was the very first immersive VR. Both the room and helmet-sized VRs used in the present day are but a sophistication of this original form of media VR tech.

Read entire essay here

Jun 27, 2016

How Ove Arup Brought Engineers Out Of The Shadows — By Meg Miller | Fast Company

Posted by in categories: architecture, engineering

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“The legendary engineer’s building philosophy has never been more relevant. This summer, he’s getting his first major museum retrospective.”

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Apr 18, 2016

Book: Space Architecture Education for Engineers and Architects: Designing and Planning Beyond Earth

Posted by in categories: architecture, education, engineering, space

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“This book considers two key educational tools for future generations of professionals with a space architecture background in the 21st century: (1) introducing the discipline of space architecture into the space system engineering curricula; and (2) developing space architecture as a distinct, complete training curriculum.”

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Apr 12, 2016

Alejandro Aravena, Winner of This Year’s Pritzker Prize, Is Giving Away His Designs — By Margaret Rhodes | Wired

Posted by in categories: architecture, open source

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“This January, Alejandro Aravena received architecture’s highest honor. This week, the Chilean architect announced that his studio, Elemental, will open-source four of its affordable housing designs. The projects can be downloaded, for free, from Elemental’s website (here).”

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Mar 25, 2016

Harvard University Unveils Plans for Its Science and Engineering Center — By John Gendall | Architectural Digest

Posted by in categories: architecture, science

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“Once a quaint academic village on the banks of the Charles River in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard, like so many other research universities, has transformed itself into a vast 21st-century institution whose significant landholdings are developed on a larger, urban scale. Part of this evolution has involved an expansion across the Charles, into the Allston area of Boston.”

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Jan 13, 2016

Architecture’s Biggest Prize Was Just Awarded to Someone You’ve Probably Never Heard Of — By Paul Goldberger | Vanity Fair

Posted by in categories: architecture, human trajectories, transportation

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“While Aravena, who is from Chile, is relatively unknown in the United States (although he taught for five years at Harvard and served for a period on the Pritzker jury), for at least the last decade he has been establishing himself on the international architecture scene as a serious and unusual practitioner who straddles, subtly but brilliantly, the worlds of formal high design and social responsibility. He has plenty of credibility as a serious designer—he was recently named curator of the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale—but his own mode of architectural practice is what sets him apart. Aravena runs Elemental, which bills itself as a “do tank”—not a think tank—and which creates “projects of public interest and social impact, including housing, public space, infrastructure and transportation.””

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Dec 9, 2015

The Lovely Chinese Watchtowers Built with Proceeds from the California Gold Rush — By Veronique Greenwood | Atlas Obscura

Posted by in category: architecture

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“Three hours out of the Chinese mega-city of Guangzhou, through the sugarcane and banana plantations and deep into the rice paddies, strange things start to rise from the fields. Called diaolou, or watchtowers, they have an oddly Western look, frosted with arches and spires and little domes that contrast with the straight lines of many traditional Chinese houses. There are more than 1,800 of these towers standing today, reaching five, six, seven stories tall.”

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Oct 29, 2015

This Building Doesn’t Need A/C: The Building Itself Is An Air Conditioner — By Ben Schiller | Fast Company

Posted by in categories: architecture, business, energy

“This ingenious cooling system circulates cooled air in an endless loop—all without any electricity.”

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Jul 31, 2015

The Seasteading Institute announces 2015 Floating City Project – Architectural Design Contest winners

Posted by in categories: architecture, governance, innovation

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The Floating City Project – Architectural Design Contest held in the Spring of 2015 was organized in partnership with DeltaSync (Netherlands) and judged by an international panel of experts.

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