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Archive for the ‘architecture’ category: Page 2

Apr 12, 2016

Alejandro Aravena, Winner of This Year’s Pritzker Prize, Is Giving Away His Designs — By Margaret Rhodes | Wired

Posted by in categories: architecture, open source

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“This January, Alejandro Aravena received architecture’s highest honor. This week, the Chilean architect announced that his studio, Elemental, will open-source four of its affordable housing designs. The projects can be downloaded, for free, from Elemental’s website (here).”

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Mar 25, 2016

Harvard University Unveils Plans for Its Science and Engineering Center — By John Gendall | Architectural Digest

Posted by in categories: architecture, science

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“Once a quaint academic village on the banks of the Charles River in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard, like so many other research universities, has transformed itself into a vast 21st-century institution whose significant landholdings are developed on a larger, urban scale. Part of this evolution has involved an expansion across the Charles, into the Allston area of Boston.”

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Jan 13, 2016

Architecture’s Biggest Prize Was Just Awarded to Someone You’ve Probably Never Heard Of — By Paul Goldberger | Vanity Fair

Posted by in categories: architecture, human trajectories, transportation

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“While Aravena, who is from Chile, is relatively unknown in the United States (although he taught for five years at Harvard and served for a period on the Pritzker jury), for at least the last decade he has been establishing himself on the international architecture scene as a serious and unusual practitioner who straddles, subtly but brilliantly, the worlds of formal high design and social responsibility. He has plenty of credibility as a serious designer—he was recently named curator of the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale—but his own mode of architectural practice is what sets him apart. Aravena runs Elemental, which bills itself as a “do tank”—not a think tank—and which creates “projects of public interest and social impact, including housing, public space, infrastructure and transportation.””

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Dec 9, 2015

The Lovely Chinese Watchtowers Built with Proceeds from the California Gold Rush — By Veronique Greenwood | Atlas Obscura

Posted by in category: architecture

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“Three hours out of the Chinese mega-city of Guangzhou, through the sugarcane and banana plantations and deep into the rice paddies, strange things start to rise from the fields. Called diaolou, or watchtowers, they have an oddly Western look, frosted with arches and spires and little domes that contrast with the straight lines of many traditional Chinese houses. There are more than 1,800 of these towers standing today, reaching five, six, seven stories tall.”

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Oct 29, 2015

This Building Doesn’t Need A/C: The Building Itself Is An Air Conditioner — By Ben Schiller | Fast Company

Posted by in categories: architecture, business, energy

“This ingenious cooling system circulates cooled air in an endless loop—all without any electricity.”

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Jul 31, 2015

The Seasteading Institute announces 2015 Floating City Project – Architectural Design Contest winners

Posted by in categories: architecture, governance, innovation

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The Floating City Project – Architectural Design Contest held in the Spring of 2015 was organized in partnership with DeltaSync (Netherlands) and judged by an international panel of experts.

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Jul 28, 2015

This 1,400-Foot Desert Citadel Would Be A Self-Sustaining City Of Tomorrow — By John Brownlee | Fast Company

Posted by in categories: architecture, food, water

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It may look like Immortan Joe’s Citadel from Mad Max: Fury Road, but this abstract desert obelisk isn’t a citadel of the post-apocalypse. It’s a self-contained city—also called an arcology—that French firms Nicholas Laisné Associés and OXO Architects propose to build in the Saharan desert.

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Jul 14, 2015

The World’s First 3D Printed Building To Be Built In Dubai — Ana Alves WTVOX

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, architecture, engineering, materials

DUBAI TO BUILD WORLD’S FIRST 3D PRINTED OFFICE

Fast-growing Dubai, where something new is always being added to the skyline, may have found a way to make construction move even faster.

In a bid to become a global hub of innovation, Dubai announced plans to build an office that will be “the most advanced 3-D printed structure ever built at this scale” and the first to be put into actual use.

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Jul 9, 2015

Urban growth: Solitair tree nursery | Monocle

Posted by in categories: architecture, environmental, habitats

Cities are often seen as the flipside of nature: synthetic, sleek and sometimes impersonal. For places that pine after being greener, the Solitair tree nursery provides a blueprint.

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Jul 3, 2015

Capturing JFK’s Space-Age TWA Terminal Before It’s Revamped | Curbed

Posted by in category: architecture

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When Lori Walters heard that the future of the iconic TWA Flight Center at JFK airport was up in the air—given that the Eero Saarinen-designed landmark from 1962 was being eyed for redevelopment—she acted quickly. A historian and researcher at the University of Central Florida’s Institute for Simulation & Training, Walters and her team at ChronoPoints use three-dimensional terrestrial laser scanning to document historic buildings. The scanning process results in highly detailed digital models that can eventually be incorporated into educational programming about the structures. While the terminal, beloved during its prime and even to this day (even though it sits unused), had long been on Walters’s mind, she said news of the plan to convert it into a hotel caused her to bump it up to the top of her scanning queue.

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