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Archive for the ‘nanotechnology’ category

Apr 16, 2024

New analysis reveals the brutal history of the Winchcombe meteorite’s journey through space

Posted by in category: nanotechnology

Intensive new nano-analysis of the Winchcombe meteorite has revealed how it was affected by water and repeatedly smashed apart and reassembled on the journey it took through space before landing in an English sheep field in 2021.

Apr 14, 2024

Nothing is everything: How hidden emptiness can define the usefulness of filtration materials

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, mathematics, nanotechnology

Voids, or empty spaces, exist within matter at all scales, from the astronomical to the microscopic. In a new study, researchers used high-powered microscopy and mathematical theory to unveil nanoscale voids in three dimensions. This advancement is poised to improve the performance of many materials used in the home and in the chemical, energy and medical industries—particularly in the area of filtration.

Magnification of common filters used in the home shows that, while they look like a solid piece of material with uniform holes, they are actually composed of millions of randomly oriented tiny voids that allow small particles to pass through. In some industrial applications, like water and solvent filtration, paper-thin membranes make up the barriers that separate fluids and particles.

“The materials science community has been aware of these randomly oriented nanoscale voids within filter membranes for a while,” said Falon Kalutantirige, a University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign graduate student.

Apr 13, 2024

Researchers Develop Simple Way To Harvest More “Blue Energy” From Waves

Posted by in categories: energy, nanotechnology

As any surfer will tell you, waves pack a powerful punch. We’re now making strides toward harnessing the ocean’s relentless movements for energy, thanks to advancements in “blue energy” technology. In a study published in ACS Energy Letters, researchers discovered that by moving the electrode from the middle to the end of a liquid-filled tube—where the water’s impact is strongest—they significantly boosted the efficiency of wave energy collection.

The tube-shaped wave-energy harvesting device improved upon by the researchers is called a liquid-solid triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG). The TENG converts mechanical energy into electricity as water sloshes back and forth against the inside of the tube. One reason these devices aren’t yet practical for large-scale applications is their low energy output. Guozhang Dai, Kai Yin, Junliang Yan, and colleagues aimed to increase a liquid-solid TENG’s energy harvesting ability by optimizing the location of the energy-collecting electrode.

Apr 11, 2024

Advanced Tech and Life Science on Station Today Promoting Health

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioprinting, biotech/medical, health, nanotechnology, science, space travel

Nanomaterials manufacturing, 3D bioprinting, and astronaut eye health were the main research topics aboard the International Space Station on Friday. The Expedition 71 crew members also continued servicing spacesuits and conducted an emergency drill.

The SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft recently delivered to the orbital outpost a biotechnology study to demonstrate the in-space production of nanomaterials that mimic DNA. NASA Flight Engineers Jeanette Epps and Mike Barratt worked on the second portion of that experiment on Thursday mixing then treating the research samples for analysis. Epps began her day mixing solutions in the Life Science Glovebox to create specialized nanomaterials. During the afternoon, Barratt applied sound and light treatments to the samples then stowed them aboard Dragon for analysis back on Earth. Results may lead to advanced therapies for space-caused and Earthbound health conditions.

The duo partnered back together at the end of the day for eye scans using standard medical imaging gear found in an optometrist’s on Earth. Barratt operated the hardware with guidance from doctors on the ground peering into Epp’s eyes and examining her retina and optic nerve for the B Complex eye health investigation.

Apr 10, 2024

Editorial: Nanotechnologies in Neuroscience and Neuroengineering

Posted by in categories: engineering, health, internet, nanotechnology, neuroscience

2 Department of Neurobiology, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States.

3Center for Bioelectric Interfaces of the Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia.

4Department of Information and Internet Technologies of Digital Health Institute, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russia.

Apr 10, 2024

Bioecon-(# 023SUPP) NSF-NBIC (2).pdf

Posted by in category: nanotechnology

Nanotechnology and microelectrode convergence of improving human performance.


Shared with Dropbox.

Apr 8, 2024

A physicist uses X-rays to rescue old music recordings

Posted by in categories: computing, engineering, media & arts, nanotechnology

Researchers are developing a technique that uses the special synchrotron X-ray light from the Swiss Light Source SLS to non-destructively digitize recordings from high-value historic audio tapes—including treasures from the Montreux Jazz Festival archive, such as a rare recording of the King of the Blues, B.B. King.

Magnetic tapes have almost completely disappeared from our lives and now only enjoy a nostalgic niche existence. However, significant quantities of these analog are still stored in the archives of sound studios, radio and TV stations, museums, and private collections worldwide. Digitizing these tapes is an ongoing challenge as well as a race against time, as the tapes degrade and eventually become unplayable.

Sebastian Gliga, physicist at PSI and expert in nanomagnetism, and his team are developing a method to non-destructively digitize degraded audio tapes in the highest quality using X-ray light. To achieve this goal, they have been collaborating with the Swiss National Sound Archives, which has produced custom-made reference recordings and provided audio engineering know-how. Now, a partnership with the Montreux Jazz Digital Project will help to further develop and test the method.

Apr 8, 2024

Revolutionizing Photonics: Researchers Achieve Unprecedented Upconversion Efficiency

Posted by in categories: energy, nanotechnology, physics

Scientists at the National University of Singapore (NUS) have introduced a groundbreaking concept known as “supercritical coupling,” which significantly boosts the efficiency of photon upconversion. This innovation not only overturns existing paradigms but also opens a new direction in the control of light emission.

Photon upconversion, the process of converting low-energy photons into higher-energy ones, is a crucial technique with broad applications, ranging from super-resolution imaging to advanced photonic devices. Despite considerable progress, the quest for efficient photon upconversion has faced challenges due to inherent limitations in the irradiance of lanthanide-doped nanoparticles and the critical coupling conditions of optical resonances.

The concept of “supercritical coupling” plays a pivotal role in addressing these challenges. This fundamentally new approach, proposed by a research team led by Professor LIU Xiaogang from the NUS Department of Chemistry and his collaborator, Dr Gianluigi ZITO from the National Research Council of Italy, leverages on the physics of “bound states in the continuum” (BICs). BICs are phenomena that enable light to be trapped in open structures with theoretically infinite lifetimes, surpassing the limits of critical coupling. These phenomena are different from the usual behavior of light.

Apr 8, 2024

Israeli Scientists Find New Way to Treat Cancer

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, nanotechnology

Israeli scientists have made yet another cancer treatment breakthrough, this time using nanosized polymers. Researchers from Ben Gurion University say they developed a way to selectively deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to blood vessels that feed tumors and metastases.

The polymer eliminates colorectal cancer liver metastases and prolongs mice survival, after a single dose-therapy, they said. The findings were published in Nano Today, a leading journal in the field of nanotechnology.

A nanosized polymer is a polymer that has been engineered to have dimensions in the nanometer range. By comparison, a human hair is about 80,000–100,000 nanometers wide. These tiny particles offer unique properties that make them desirable for a wide range of applications.

Apr 7, 2024

Blueprinting extendable nanomaterials with standardized protein blocks

Posted by in categories: engineering, nanotechnology

Remarkable advance in protein engineering wherein Huddy et al.


A study describes an approach using designed building blocks that are far more regular in geometry than natural proteins to construct modular multicomponent protein assemblies.

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