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Nov 23, 2020

The Economic Singularity: From Capitalism’s Unplanned Obsolescence to the New Transcendent Economy

Posted by in categories: economics, nanotechnology, singularity, sustainability, virtual reality

What if with the new wave of technologies, such as nanotechnology which would enable us to reprogram matter at a molecular level, we can overcome scarcity once and for all? Design would then become the most important part from start to end product which can be freely shared or have a premium in the marketplace. At any rate, this will dismantle the current social, economic, and political system, because it will become irrelevant; every institution, every value system, every aspect of our lives have been governed by scarcity: the problem of distributing a finite amount of “stuff.” There will be no need for any of today’s social institutions. In other words, when nanotech and ultra-realistic VR are commonplace, the system built on scarcity will crumble and that would herald the forthcoming “economic singularity.” #EconomicSiingularity


The current faltering economic model is suboptimal, hinders economic growth, and is not sustainable going forward.

Continue reading “The Economic Singularity: From Capitalism’s Unplanned Obsolescence to the New Transcendent Economy” »

Nov 23, 2020

Scientists observe directed energy transport between neighboring molecules in a nanomaterial

Posted by in categories: chemistry, nanotechnology, physics, solar power, sustainability

When light falls on a material, such as a green leaf or the retina, certain molecules transport energy and charge. This ultimately leads to the separation of charges and the generation of electricity. Molecular funnels, so-called conical intersections, ensure that this transport is highly efficient and directed.

An international team of physicists has now observed that such conical intersections also ensure a directed energy transport between neighboring of a nanomaterial. Theoretical simulations have confirmed the . Until now, scientists had observed this phenomenon only within one molecule. In the long term, the results could help to develop more efficient nanomaterials for organic solar cells, for example. The study, led by Antonietta De Sio, University of Oldenburg, and Thomas Frauenheim, University of Bremen, Germany, was published in the current issue of the scientific journal Nature Nanotechnology.

Photochemical processes play a major role in nature and in technology: When molecules absorb light, their electrons transit to an excited state. This transition triggers extremely fast molecular switching processes. In the human eye, for example, the molecule rhodopsin rotates in a certain way after absorbing light and thus ultimately triggers an electrical signal—the most elementary step in the visual process.

Nov 23, 2020

Nanobots Will Be Flowing Through Your Body by 2030

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, nanotechnology

In 10 years, tiny nanobots in your blood might help keep you from getting sick or even transmit your thoughts to a wireless cloud.

Nov 21, 2020

CRISPR Technique Effectively Destroys Metastatic Cancer Cells in Living Animal

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, nanotechnology

The work was conducted in the laboratory of Dan Peer, PhD, VP for R&D and Head of the Laboratory of Precision Nanomedicine at the Shmunis School of Biomedicine and Cancer Research at TAU. The research was conducted by Daniel Rosenblum, PhD, together with PhD student Anna Gutkin and colleagues in Peer’s laboratory and other collaborators.

The study “CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing using targeted lipid nanoparticles for cancer therapy” appears in Science Advances.

“Harnessing CRISPR-Cas9 technology for cancer therapeutics has been hampered by low editing efficiency in tumors and potential toxicity of existing delivery systems. Here, we describe a safe and efficient lipid nanoparticle (LNP) for the delivery of Cas9 mRNA and sgRNAs that use a novel amino-ionizable lipid,” write the investigators.

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Nov 19, 2020

Researchers describe fundamental processes behind movement of magnetic particles

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, nanotechnology

The motion of magnetic particles as they pass through a magnetic field is called magnetophoresis. Until now, not much was known about the factors influencing these particles and their movement. Now, researchers from the University of Illinois Chicago describe several fundamental processes associated with the motion of magnetic particles through fluids as they are pulled by a magnetic field.

Their findings are reported in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Understanding more about the motion of magnetic particles as they pass through a magnetic field has numerous applications, including , biosensors, molecular imaging, and catalysis. For example, loaded with drugs can be delivered to discrete spots in the body after they are injected into the bloodstream or using magnets. This process currently is used in some forms of chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer.

Nov 16, 2020

New technology allows more precise view of the smallest nanoparticles

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, nanotechnology

Current state-of-the-art techniques have clear limitations when it comes to imaging the smallest nanoparticles, making it difficult for researchers to study viruses and other structures at the molecular level.

Scientists from the University of Houston and the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center have reported in Nature Communications a new optical imaging technology for nanoscale objects, relying upon unscattered to detect as small as 25 nanometers in diameter. The technology, known as PANORAMA, uses a glass slide covered with gold nanodiscs, allowing scientists to monitor changes in the and determine the target’s characteristics.

PANORAMA takes its name from Plasmonic Nano-aperture Label-free Imaging (PlAsmonic NanO-apeRture lAbel-free iMAging), signifying the key characteristics of the technology. PANORAMA can be used to detect, count and determine the size of individual dielectric nanoparticles.

Nov 16, 2020

No losses: Scientists stuff graphene with light

Posted by in categories: chemistry, energy, nanotechnology, physics

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Physicists from MIPT and Vladimir State University, Russia, have converted light energy into surface waves on graphene with nearly 90% efficiency. They relied on a laser-like energy conversion scheme and collective resonances. The paper was published in Laser & Photonics Reviews.

Manipulating light at the nanoscale is a task crucial for being able to create ultracompact devices for optical conversion and storage. To localize light on such a small scale, researchers convert optical radiation into so-called plasmon-polaritons. These SPPs are oscillations propagating along the interface between two materials with drastically different refractive indices—specifically, a metal and a dielectric or air. Depending on the materials chosen, the degree of surface wave localization varies. It is the strongest for light localized on a material only one atomic layer thick, because such 2-D materials have high refractive indices.

Continue reading “No losses: Scientists stuff graphene with light” »

Nov 16, 2020

Separate Antiaging Trials for Rapamycin and Metformin

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension, nanotechnology, robotics/AI, singularity


AgelessRx claims that PEARL is the first nationwide telemedicine trial and one of the first large-scale intervention trials on Longevity. The human trial is a stepping stone to the way to bringing rapamycin to the Longevity market. PEARL (Participatory Evaluation of Aging with Rapamycin for Longevity) is a $600,000 trial with the University of California. They will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of rapamycin in 200 healthy adults for Longevity in double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

Interested patients will be screened for eligibility using telemedicine. Eligible patients include those aged 50–85 of any sex, any ethnicity, in relatively good health, with only well-managed, clinically stable chronic diseases.

TAME is a separate $75 million trial to clinically evaluate Metformin drugs for Longevity properties. TAME has a composite primary endpoint – of stroke, heart failure, dementia, myocardial infarction, cancer and death. Rather than attempting to cure one endpoint, it will look to delay the onset of any endpoint, extending the years in which subjects remain in good health – their healthspan. A $40 million donation has been combined with a $35 million NIH grant to fund the TAME trial.

Nov 14, 2020

Nanotechnologies to help in new cancer treatment strategy

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, nanotechnology

A new project has been set up to develop an immunologic-based treatment strategy where cancer cells are reprogrammed to become ‘visible’ to the patient’s immune system.

Nov 13, 2020

Researchers create MRI-like technique for imaging magnetic waves

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, health, nanotechnology

A team of researchers from Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Leiden University, Tohoku University and the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter has developed a new type of MRI scanner that can image waves in ultrathin magnets. Unlike electrical currents, these so-called spin waves produce little heat, making them promising signal carriers for future green ICT applications.

MRI scanners can look into the human body in a non-invasive manner. The scanner detects the magnetic fields radiated by the atoms inside, which makes it possible to study the health of organs even though they are hidden underneath thick layers of tissue.

The non-invasive, see-through power of MRI is desirable for many research fields and industries. It could be particularly useful as an imaging tool in nanotechnology and the chip industry. Being able to detect signals in computer chips and other nanodevices would facilitate optimizing their performance and reducing their heat production. However, the millimeter resolution of conventional MRI is insufficient to study chip-scale devices. A team of researchers led by TU Delft have now developed a new method for sensing at the sub-micrometer scale.

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