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Archive for the ‘cryonics’ category

Mar 13, 2017

Scientists Have Made a Huge Breakthrough In Cryogenics

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cryonics, life extension

Cryopreservation is the process of freezing organs and tissues at very low temperatures in order to preserve them. While it sounds simple in theory, only a handful of cells and tissues have survived this method. This is because while science has successfully developed ways to cool organs to the very low temperatures required for preservation, thawing them out has proven far more difficult. As the specimen thaws, it forms ice crystals, which can damage the tissue and render organs unusable.

Right now, the process is only a viable option for small samples, such as sperm or embryos. Previous efforts using slow warming techniques have proven to be effective on samples of that size, but haven’t worked for larger tissue samples, like whole human organs. The inability to safely thaw the tissue has also precluded the theoretical concept of cryogenically preserving entire human bodies, with the intention of reanimating them later. The concept has roots in cryogenic technology, but is actually referred to as “cryonics”, and the scientific community generally considers it to be more science fiction than science fact — at least for the time being.

A recent study has made a significant breakthrough which may well begin closing that gap even more. Using a new technique, scientists were able to cryopreserve human and pig samples, then successfully rewarm it without causing any damage to the tissue.

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Mar 9, 2017

Life and death: When the end arrives, should we upgrade or shut down?

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cryonics, geopolitics, law, life extension, transhumanism

Transhumanism appearing in the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s (AAAS) magazine: Science…


Modern technology and modern medical practice have evolved over the past decades, enabling us to enhance and extend human life to an unprecedented degree. The two books under review examine this phenomenon from remarkably different perspectives.

Mark O’Connell’s To Be a Machine is an examination of transhumanism, a movement characterized by technologies that seek to transform the human condition and extend life spans indefinitely. O’Connell, a journalist, makes his own prejudices clear: “I am not now, nor have I ever been, a transhumanist,” he writes. However, this does not stop him from thoughtfully surveying the movement.

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Feb 27, 2017

‘They want to be literally machines’: Writer Mark O’Connell on the rise of transhumanists

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cryonics, cyborgs, life extension, neuroscience, transhumanism

Slate book columnist Mark O’Connell’s new book To Be a Machine, which is specifically about #transhumanism, is out tomorrow. So there’s a ton of reviews out in major media. The last chapter in the book is about my work. Here are 3 reviews just out on the book. ALSO, I highly encourage you to BUY the book to help transhumanism grow. Mark’s book is the first book specifically on the movement with this kind of international attention, and the better the book does the first week, the more people will know about transhumanism: http://www.theverge.com/2017/2/25/14730958/transhumanism-mar…biohackers &

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/books-and-media/book-rev…e34127614/ &

Mark O’Connell Doesn’t Want to Be a Cyborg: The Millions Interview

Continue reading “‘They want to be literally machines’: Writer Mark O’Connell on the rise of transhumanists” »

Feb 11, 2017

Value Conflicts surrounding the Meaning of Life in the Trans/Post/Human Future

Posted by in categories: biological, cryonics, cyborgs, economics, environmental, ethics, futurism, governance, health, homo sapiens, law, mobile phones, policy, posthumanism, security, theory, transhumanism

Posthumanists and perhaps especially transhumanists tend to downplay the value conflicts that are likely to emerge in the wake of a rapidly changing technoscientific landscape. What follows are six questions and scenarios that are designed to focus thinking by drawing together several tendencies that are not normally related to each other but which nevertheless provide the basis for future value conflicts.

  1. Will ecological thinking eventuate in an instrumentalization of life? Generally speaking, biology – especially when a nervous system is involved — is more energy efficient when it comes to storing, accessing and processing information than even the best silicon-based computers. While we still don’t quite know why this is the case, we are nevertheless acquiring greater powers of ‘informing’ biological processes through strategic interventions, ranging from correcting ‘genetic errors’ to growing purpose-made organs, including neurons, from stem-cells. In that case, might we not ‘grow’ some organs to function in largely the same capacity as silicon-based computers – especially if it helps to reduce the overall burden that human activity places on the planet? (E.g. the brains in the vats in the film The Minority Report which engage in the precognition of crime.) In other words, this new ‘instrumentalization of life’ may be the most environmentally friendly way to prolong our own survival. But is this a good enough reason? Would these specially created organic thought-beings require legal protection or even rights? The environmental movement has been, generally speaking, against the multiplication of artificial life forms (e.g. the controversies surrounding genetically modified organisms), but in this scenario these life forms would potentially provide a means to achieve ecologically friendly goals.

  1. Will concerns for social justice force us to enhance animals? We are becoming more capable of recognizing and decoding animal thoughts and feelings, a fact which has helped to bolster those concerned with animal welfare, not to mention ‘animal rights’. At the same time, we are also developing prosthetic devices (of the sort already worn by Steven Hawking) which can enhance the powers of disabled humans so their thoughts and feelings are can be communicated to a wider audience and hence enable them to participate in society more effectively. Might we not wish to apply similar prosthetics to animals – and perhaps even ourselves — in order to facilitate the transaction of thoughts and feelings between humans and animals? This proposal might aim ultimately to secure some mutually agreeable ‘social contract’, whereby animals are incorporated more explicitly in the human life-world — not as merely wards but as something closer to citizens. (See, e.g., Donaldson and Kymlicka’s Zoopolis.) However, would this set of policy initiatives constitute a violation of the animals’ species integrity and simply be a more insidious form of human domination?

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Feb 6, 2017

International Longevity and Cryopreservation Summit Spain

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cryonics, life extension

2017 sees the first longevity and cryo international event in Spain in three cities! Great to see the interest in rejuvenation biotechnology growing globally.


Spain hosts its first longevity and cryonics event this year and we take a quick look at what’s in store.

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Jan 30, 2017

International Longevity & Cryopreservation Summit

Posted by in categories: cryonics, life extension

New H+ Longevity and Cryo event in Spain!


The First Longevity and Cryonics event in Spain will be held on May 26–28 2017 In Madrid.

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Jan 19, 2017

After 50 years, frozen WWI veteran’s body awaits reanimation

Posted by in categories: cryonics, finance, life extension, neuroscience

“His body, along with the others, will remain frozen indefinitely, with enough ongoing financial support to sustain its current state, news.com.au reported.

Last year, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology graduate successfully froze and reanimated a rabbit brain”.


Since his death, James Bedford’s body has been cryogenically frozen and awaiting reanimation on the edge of the Sonaran Desert in Arizona. This week marks the 50th year of Bedford’s deep freeze, making him the oldest “de-animated” human being on earth.

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Dec 18, 2016

14-Year-Old Girl Who Died of Cancer Wins Right to be Cryogenically Frozen

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cryonics, life extension

A 14-year-old girl who said before dying of cancer that she wanted a chance to live longer has been allowed by the high court to have her body cryogenically frozen in the hope that she can be brought back to life at a later time.

The court ruled that the teenager’s mother, who supported the girl’s wish to be cryogenically preserved, should be the only person allowed to make decisions about the disposal of her body. Her estranged father had initially opposed her wishes.

During the last months of her life, the teenager, who had a rare form of cancer, used the internet to investigate cryonics. Known only as JS, she sent a letter to the court: “I have been asked to explain why I want this unusual thing done. I’m only 14 years old and I don’t want to die, but I know I am going to. I think being cryo‐preserved gives me a chance to be cured and woken up, even in hundreds of years’ time.

Continue reading “14-Year-Old Girl Who Died of Cancer Wins Right to be Cryogenically Frozen” »

Nov 20, 2016

In Opinion: ‘Dead is gone forever:’ The need for cryonics policy

Posted by in categories: cryonics, life extension, policy, transhumanism

Check out my latest story for Newsweek: http://www.newsweek.com/dead-gone-forever-need-cryonics-policy-523030 #transhumanism #cryonics


The case of a 14-year-old UK girl whose body was preserved after death highlights the need for governments to take cryonics seriously.

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Nov 17, 2016

Cryogenics: does it offer humanity a chance to return from the dead?

Posted by in categories: cryonics, life extension

While it used to be the stuff of science fiction, the technology behind the dream has advanced in recent years.

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