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Archive for the ‘genetics’ category

Jul 27, 2021

Quantifying Biological Age: Blood Test #3 in 2021

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, information science, life extension

Links to biological age calculators:
Levine’s PhenoAge calculator is embedded as an Excel file:

https://michaellustgarten.com/2019/09/09/quantifying-biological-age/

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Jul 27, 2021

TAME Q&A: Lessons for Progress on Aging | Nir Barzilai, Albert Einstein School of Medicine

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, genetics, life extension, nanotechnology

More TAME! The first part of this has a lot of result data.


Foresight Biotech & Health Extension Meeting sponsored by 100 Plus Capital.
2021 program & apply to join: https://foresight.org/biotech-health-extension-program/

Continue reading “TAME Q&A: Lessons for Progress on Aging | Nir Barzilai, Albert Einstein School of Medicine” »

Jul 26, 2021

How Gene Therapy and Algae Proteins Partially Restored a Blind Man’s Sight

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, neuroscience

The result is optogenetics, a mind-controlling technique that’s become one of neuroscience’s most popular tools. Here, scientists use genetic engineering to put different types of algae proteins into the brains of mice. They can then activate a neuron with an implanted fiber optic cable by pulsing certain wavelengths of light. These enhanced brain cells react as they would naturally, generating an electrical signal that’s passed down and interpreted by the mouse’s brain.

Sound familiar?

If an algae protein can artificially allow neurons in the brain to translate light into electrical information, why can’t it do the same for damaged eyes?

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Jul 25, 2021

TRIIM-X 2nd Phase Clinical Trial For Reversing Human Aging | Study Review

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, life extension

A summary of the sequel trial for a cocktail of drugs that originally turned back epigenetic clocks by 2.5 years. I do wonder what effect plasma filtering has on the thymus if any.


In this video we review the TRIIM study and look at the trial document for TRIIM-X, the extension study that Dr. Fahy is now conducting.

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Jul 23, 2021

New Gene Therapy Developed That Could Be Effective Against Many Types of Cancer

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics

Mount Sinai researchers have developed a therapeutic agent that shows high effectiveness in vitro at disrupting a biological pathway that helps cancer survive, according to a paper published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, in July.

The therapy is an engineered molecule, named MS21, that causes the degradation of AKT, an enzyme that is overly active in many cancers. This study laid out evidence that pharmacological degradation of AKT is a viable treatment for cancers with mutations in certain genes.

AKT is a cancer gene that encodes an enzyme that is frequently abnormally activated in cancer cells to stimulate tumor growth. Degradation of AKT reverses these processes and inhibits tumor growth.

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Jul 23, 2021

Scientists made this rat fearless

Posted by in categories: food, genetics, neuroscience, robotics/AI

Neuroscientists removed fear from rats by inactivating amygdala — brain region mediating fear.

#Neuroscience #Brain #YuriNeuro #Neurobiology #Amygdala.

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Jul 23, 2021

The potential role of ‘junk DNA’ sequence in aging, cancer

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, life extension

An aging/longevity/junk dna link.

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The human body is essentially made up of trillions of living cells. It ages as its cells age, which happens when those cells eventually stop replicating and dividing. Scientists have long known that genes influence how cells age and how long humans live, but how that works exactly remains unclear. Findings from a new study led by researchers at Washington State University have solved a small piece of that puzzle, bringing scientists one step closer to solving the mystery of aging.

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Jul 23, 2021

Scientists reverse age-related memory loss in mice

Posted by in categories: genetics, life extension, neuroscience

Scientists at Cambridge and Leeds have successfully reversed age-related memory loss in mice and say their discovery could lead to the development of treatments to prevent memory loss in people as they age.

In a study published today in Molecular Psychiatry, the team show that changes in the extracellular matrix of the brain — ‘scaffolding’ around nerve cells—lead to loss of with aging, but that it is possible to reverse these using genetic treatments.

Recent evidence has emerged of the role of perineuronal nets (PNNs) in neuroplasticity—the ability of the brain to learn and adapt—and to make memories. PNNs are cartilage-like structures that mostly surround inhibitory neurons in the brain. Their main function is to control the level of plasticity in the brain. They appear at around five years old in humans, and turn off the period of enhanced plasticity during which the connections in the brain are optimized. Then, plasticity is partially turned off, making the brain more efficient but less plastic.

Jul 23, 2021

Vaccines Are Pushing Pathogens to Evolve

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution, genetics

In March 2017, Read and his Penn State colleague David Kennedy published a paper in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B in which they outlined several strategies that vaccine developers could use to ensure that future vaccines don’t get punked by evolutionary forces. One overarching recommendation is that vaccines should induce immune responses against multiple targets. A number of successful, seemingly evolution-proof vaccines already work this way: After people get inoculated with a tetanus shot, for example, their blood contains 100 types of unique antibodies, all of which fight the bacteria in different ways. In such a situation, it becomes much harder for a pathogen to accumulate all the changes needed to survive. It also helps if vaccines target all the known subpopulations of a particular pathogen, not just the most common or dangerous ones. Richard Malley and other researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital are, for instance, trying to develop a universal pneumococcal vaccine that is not serotype-specific.

Vaccines should also bar pathogens from replicating and transmitting inside inoculated hosts. One of the reasons that vaccine resistance is less of a problem than antibiotic resistance, Read and Kennedy posit, is that antibiotics tend to be given after an infection has already taken hold — when the pathogen population inside the host is already large and genetically diverse and might include mutants that can resist the drug’s effects. Most vaccines, on the other hand, are administered before infection and limit replication, which minimizes evolutionary opportunities.

But the most crucial need right now is for vaccine scientists to recognize the relevance of evolutionary biology to their field. Last month, when more than 1000 vaccine scientists gathered in Washington, D.C., at the World Vaccine Congress, the issue of vaccine-induced evolution was not the focus of any scientific sessions. Part of the problem, Read says, is that researchers are afraid: They’re nervous to talk about and call attention to potential evolutionary effects because they fear that doing so might fuel more fear and distrust of vaccines by the public — even though the goal is, of course, to ensure long-term vaccine success. Still, he and Kennedy feel researchers are starting to recognize the need to include evolution in the conversation. “I think the scientific community is becoming increasingly aware that vaccine resistance is a real risk,” Kennedy said.

Jul 23, 2021

Nature has learnt how to eat our plastic!

Posted by in categories: food, genetics, neuroscience, sustainability

Nature always finds a way…so they say! But it looks like it may actually be true in the case of our global plastic waste dilemma. Genetic mutations have been discovered in specific natural bacteria that enable them to break the polymer chains of certain plastics. Where have we found these bacteria? Well…in plastic recycling dumps of course. So, gloves and masks on everyone. We’re going in!

Video Transcripts available at our website.
http://www.justhaveathink.com.

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