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Archive for the ‘genetics’ category

Sep 24, 2017

Transhumanism: Could we live forever? BBC News

Posted by in categories: genetics, life extension, nanotechnology, robotics/AI, transhumanism

Dear all.

Hope you like it! Please make comments. Many tks.

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Sep 22, 2017

Listen up: the easiest place to use CRISPR might be in your ear

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics

Scientists are hopeful they can inject the gene-editing technology directly into the ear to stop hereditary deafness.

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Sep 21, 2017

Scientists discover ‘master gene’ crucial for successful pregnancy

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, government

S cientists have edited human embryos for the first time in the UK to discover a “master gene” that underpins successful pregnancies. The “game-changing” research promises improved IVF outcomes and a breakthrough in understanding why so many pregnancies fail.

The Government-funded investigation, undertaken by the Francis Crick Institute, is the first to prove that gene editing can be used to study the genetic behaviour of human embryos in their first few days of life.

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Sep 20, 2017

Fathers pass on four times as many new genetic mutations as mothers – study

Posted by in category: genetics

Researchers studied 14,000 Icelanders and found that men passed on one new mutation for every eight months of age, compared with women who passed on a new mutation for every three years of age.

The figures mean that a child born to 30-year-old parents would, on average, inherit 11 new mutations from the mother, but 45 from the father.

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Sep 15, 2017

Why we did not evolve to live forever: Unveiling the mystery of why we age

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution, genetics, life extension, neuroscience

Researchers at the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB) in Mainz, Germany, have made a breakthrough in understanding the origin of the ageing process. They have identified that genes belonging to a process called autophagy — one of the cells most critical survival processes — promote health and fitness in young worms but drive the process of ageing later in life. This research published in the journal Genes & Development gives some of the first clear evidence for how the ageing process arises as a quirk of evolution. These findings may also have broader implications for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s disease where autophagy is implicated. The researchers show that by promoting longevity through shutting down autophagy in old worms there is a strong improvement in neuronal and subsequent whole body health.

Getting old, it’s something that happens to everyone and nearly every species on this planet, but the question is, should it? In a recent publication in the journal Genes & Development titled “Neuronal inhibition of the nucleation complex extends lifespan in post-reproductive C. elegans,” the laboratory of Dr Holger Richly at IMB, has found some of the first genetic evidence that may put this question to rest.

As Charles Darwin explained, natural selection results in the fittest individuals for a given environment surviving to breed and pass on their genes to the next generation. The more fruitful a trait is at promoting reproductive success, the stronger the selection for that trait will be. In theory, this should give rise to individuals with traits which prevent ageing as their genes could be passed on nearly continuously. Thus, despite the obvious facts to the contrary, from the point of evolution ageing should never have happened. This evolutionary contradiction has been debated and theorised on since the 1800s. It was only in 1953 with his hypothesis of antagonistic pleiotropy (AP) that George C. Williams gave us a rational explanation for how ageing can arise in a population through evolution. Williams proposed that natural selection enriches genes promoting reproductive success but consequently ignores their negative effects on longevity.

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Sep 15, 2017

Study Investigates Vaccine and Oral Medication to Stop Alzheimer’s Years Before it Begins

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, neuroscience

Summary: Researchers are testing a new vaccine and oral medication that could delay or prevent Alzheimer’s disease from developing in those with a genetic predisposition.

Source: Keck Medicine USC.

The Keck School of Medicine of USC launches a study exploring whether two different therapies can prevent a leading cause of death.

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Sep 15, 2017

This Brooklyn-Based Startup Is Growing Leather In Labs—Cruelty Free

Posted by in categories: food, genetics

Modern Meadow believes leather is a “co-product of the meat industry.” You can’t get cattle hide without stripping it from meat. Rather than configuring new ways to utilize polymers, the Brooklyn-based company genetically creates proteins similar to bovine collagen. As Inventionr reports :

Modern Meadow has formulated a method of activating the building blocks of proteins to form fibres without using natural fibroblasts. Once the fibres form, they can as well be assembled, according to its intended purposes, into fine sheets of leather. Once the process reaches this point, other processes like tanning and dyeing can proceed in the normal way.

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Sep 13, 2017

Researchers Discover Key to Brain Aging

Posted by in categories: genetics, life extension, neuroscience

Researchers announced yesterday that they discovered a #genetic #brain #aging #clock that controls how our brains age. The clock controls brain aging according to a precise timetable. This discovery holds promise that scientists can prevent brain aging by stopping the clock.


Summary: Researchers announced yesterday that they discovered a genetic brain aging clock that controls how our brains age. The clock controls aging in our brains according to a precise timetable. This discovery holds promise that scientists can prevent brain aging by stopping the clock.

Imagine keeping your mind sharp as a teenager’s while you grow older, even into your twilight years.

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Sep 13, 2017

The Libertarian Futurist’s Case for Avoiding War and Military Entanglements

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, genetics, military, policy, robotics/AI

My new policy article for the HuffPost on why more than ever we need to avoid war and armed conflict:


Some of the early years of my adult life were in conflict zones as a journalist—which included covering the Pakistan/Indian Kashmir conflict for the National Geographic Channel and The New York Times Syndicate. War zones are terrifying. One always is worried about bullying soldiers, speeding armed military vehicles, stray bullets, and whether there’s a roadside bomb on your path. Anyone that approaches you is suspect and could be carrying ready-to-detonate explosives.

One thing conflict zones teach you is that freedom is precious. The nearly 70-year Kashmir conflict has approximately a half million soldiers involved, so even if they’re supposedly on your side (depending on what country you’re in), you still feel under siege. My time in certain parts of Sudan, Israel, Palestine, Zimbabwe, Lebanon, Sri Lanka, Eritrea, Mali, and Yemen left me with the same feeling.

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Sep 12, 2017

Is CRISPR really such a big deal?

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics

Put simply: Yes. Here’s why, and the nitty gritty of how the gene-editing tool works.

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