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Archive for the ‘genetics’ category

Feb 22, 2020

A vast range of infectious diseases, ranging from AIDS to Ebola, are now curable

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, robotics/AI

Do you agree.


In addition, gene-editing technologies continue to advance in precision and ease of use, allowing families to treat and ultimately cure hundreds of inheritable genetic diseases.

This metatrend is driven by the convergence of: various biotechnologies (CRISPR, Gene Therapy), genome sequencing, and artificial intelligence.

Continue reading “A vast range of infectious diseases, ranging from AIDS to Ebola, are now curable” »

Feb 22, 2020

Optimising gene editing for cancer therapy

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics

Gene editing holds promise for the treatment of cancers that are driven by well-characterised molecular alterations. A study now provides a proof of concept for the feasibility of in vivo gene editing to correct TERT mutations in glioblastoma, providing a platform for the direct manipulation of genetic alterations to reduce tumour growth.

Feb 22, 2020

By decoding the coronavirus genome, scientists seek the upper hand against COVID-19

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics

Today, when a deadly virus explodes out of nowhere, geneticists are indispensable players in the international game of whodunit. Here’s how they help.

Feb 22, 2020

The next chapter for African genomics

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution, genetics, surveillance

The rest of the world is interested, too. Africa contains much more genetic diversity than any other continent because humans originated there. This diversity can provide insights into human evolution and common diseases. Yet fewer than 2% of the genomes that have been analysed come from Africans. A dearth of molecular-biology research on the continent also means that people of African descent might not benefit from drugs tailored to unique genetic variations. Infectious-disease surveillance also falls short, meaning that dangerous pathogens could evade detection until an outbreak is too big to contain easily.


Nigeria is poised to become a hub for genetics research, but a few stubborn challenges block the way.

Feb 21, 2020

Earliest interbreeding event between ancient human populations discovered

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution, genetics

For three years, anthropologist Alan Rogers has attempted to solve an evolutionary puzzle. His research untangles millions of years of human evolution by analyzing DNA strands from ancient human species known as hominins. Like many evolutionary geneticists, Rogers compares hominin genomes looking for genetic patterns such as mutations and shared genes. He develops statistical methods that infer the history of ancient human populations.

In 2017, Rogers led a study which found that two lineages of ancient humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans, separated much earlier than previously thought and proposed a bottleneck population size. It caused some controversy—anthropologists Mafessoni and Prüfer argued that their method for analyzing the DNA produced different results. Rogers agreed, but realized that neither method explained the genetic data very well.

“Both of our methods under discussion were missing something, but what?” asked Rogers, professor of anthropology at the University of Utah.

Feb 21, 2020

Data for praying mantis mitochondrial genomes and phylogenetic constructions within Mantodea

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics

In this data article, we provide five datasets of mantis mitochondrial genomes: PCG123: nucleotide sequences of 13 protein-coding genes including all codon positions; PCG123R: nucleotide sequences of two rRNAs and 13 protein-coding genes including all codon positions; PCG12: nucleotide sequences of 13 protein-coding genes without third codon positions; PCG12R: nucleotide sequences of two rRNAs and 13 protein-coding genes without third codon positions, and PCGAA: amino acid sequences of 13 protein-coding genes. These were used to construct phylogenetic relationships within Mantodea and the phylogenetic trees inferred from Bayesian analysis using two data sets (PCG12R, PCGAA) and Maximum Likelihood analysis using four data sets (PCG123, PCG12, PCG12R and PCGAA). We also provide initiation codon, termination codon, amino acid length and nucleotide diversity (Pi) of protein-coding genes among 27 mantises. The whole mitochondrial genomes of 27 praying mantises were submitted to GenBank with the accession numbers KY689112 KY689138.

Feb 21, 2020

Yuri Deigin on epigenetic rejuvenation, longevity research and transhumanists in politics

Posted by in categories: cryonics, genetics, life extension, transhumanism

Had a very frank discussion with Greg Mustreader about transhumanism, learned helplessness of society in the face of aging and death, insufficient sense of urgency among researchers of aging, epigenetic rejuvenation, cryonics, and so on. No filter! 😁.


My blog on Medium: https://medium.com/@mustreader

Continue reading “Yuri Deigin on epigenetic rejuvenation, longevity research and transhumanists in politics” »

Feb 21, 2020

CRISPR safety switch can make cells self-destruct if they go rogue

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics

A genetic tweak can make cells self-destruct in the presence of CRISPR and could be used to shut down cell therapies if they go rogue.

Feb 21, 2020

This Company Built a Gigantic Centrifuge to Fling Rockets Into Space

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, space travel

In some biology classes, teachers will place vials of spit into a funny looking contraption and let it spin around the samples until the stringy DNA separates from the rest of the saliva. It’s a pretty rudimentary experiment, but it quickly gets to the heart of not only your own genetic material, but also how centrifugal force works: Spinning really fast in a circle creates a force strong enough to push a moving object out and away from the center of its path.

But what happens when that moving object is a rocket that weighs thousands of pounds? We might find out as soon as this year, when a cryptic startup called SpinLaunch starts suborbital test flights of a rocket that is launched using an enormous centrifuge.

Here’s the gist: A centrifuge the size of a football field will spin a rocket around in circles for about an hour until its speed eventually exceeds 5,000 miles per hour. At that point, the rocket and its payload will feel forces 10,000 times stronger than gravity. When the centrifuge finally releases the rocket at launch speed, it should, practically speaking, fly through the stratosphere until it fires its engines at the periphery of our atmosphere.

Feb 19, 2020

Homo Sapiens 2.0? We need a species-wide conversation about the future of human genetic enhancement

Posted by in categories: genetics, space travel

And the revolution has already begun.

Today’s genetic moment is not the stuff of science fiction. It’s not Jules Verne’s fanciful 1865 prediction of a moon landing a century before it occurred. It’s more equivalent to President Kennedy’s 1962 announcement that America would send men to the moon within a decade. All of the science was in place when Kennedy gave his Houston speech. The realization was inevitable; only the timing was at issue. Neil Armstrong climbed down the Apollo 11 ladder seven years later.

Continue reading “Homo Sapiens 2.0? We need a species-wide conversation about the future of human genetic enhancement” »

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