Blog

Archive for the ‘genetics’ category

Apr 26, 2017

15 books to browse ahead of TED2017

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, employment, genetics, information science, life extension, mathematics

2017 begins on Monday in Vancouver, Canada, and will explore the theme “The Future You.” If the future you is anything like the future us, you are likely curled up in a big cushy chair right now, devouring the contents of a book that flips your thinking. Below, some reading suggestions from the speaker program. Read, enjoy and stay tuned to the TED Blog for beat-by-beat coverage of the conference.


TED2017 begins on Monday in Vancouver, Canada, and will explore the theme “The Future You.” If the future you is anything like the future us, you are likely curled up in a big cushy chair right now, devouring the contents of a book that flips your thinking. Below, some reading suggestions from the speaker program. Read, enjoy and stay tuned to the TED Blog for beat-by-beat coverage of the conference.

Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy by Cathy O’Neil. The decisions that affect our lives are no longer made by humans — they’re made by algorithms. This might sound like a great way around bias and discrimination, but these things are often built right into our mathematical models. When it comes to college admissions, decisions on parole, applications to jobs and the affects of a bad credit score, O’Neil explores the unintended consequences of algorithms. (Read an excerpt.)

Continue reading “15 books to browse ahead of TED2017” »

Apr 21, 2017

Daisy Robinton — The Fight Against Aging

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, business, food, genetics, life extension, neuroscience

Primarily talking about CRISPR.


Daisy Robinton explores bioengineering and its potential to end ageing.

Continue reading “Daisy Robinton — The Fight Against Aging” »

Apr 17, 2017

Are Genetically Modified Astronauts Key To Colonizing Mars?

Posted by in categories: genetics, space

Some think the only way for humans to survive in space is to genetically modify them.

Read more

Apr 17, 2017

We Must Prepare for CRISPR Bioterror Threats

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, government

  • An advisory council has urged the U.S. to establish a new body that creates plans for national biodefense and to set aside a $2 billion standby fund to address emerging bioterror threats.
  • As gene editing technology advances, the potential for its use as a weapon increases, and preparing for such threats before they happen is of the utmost importance.

Though the technology promises seemingly innumerable ways to positively impact human life, gene editing is truly a double-edged sword, with nearly as many potentially negative consequences as benefits. Now, an advisory council to President Obama is urging the government to start creating countermeasures for the negative use of emerging biotechnologies.

This month, the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) wrote a letter to President Obama recommending measures to address this potential for harm using new technologies. It advocates funding new research into antibiotic and antiviral drugs to combat resistance and having a $250 million fund for the stockpiling of vaccines.

Continue reading “We Must Prepare for CRISPR Bioterror Threats” »

Apr 14, 2017

A new CRISPR breakthrough could lead to simpler, cheaper disease diagnosis

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics

The controversial laboratory tool known as CRISPR may have found a whole new world to conquer. Already the favored method of editing genes, CRISPR could soon become a low-cost diagnostic tool that could be used practically anywhere to determine if someone has an infectious disease such as Zika or dengue.


The controversial gene-editing tool may be able to identify infections reliably for pennies in places without electricity.

Read more

Apr 13, 2017

Gene editing opens doors to seedless fruit with no need for bees

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics

Gene-edited seedless tomatoes don’t need pollinating to produce fruit – which could come in useful at a time when bees are on the decline.

Read more

Apr 12, 2017

Octopuses Can Edit Their Own DNA, Which Might Explain Their High Intelligence

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution, genetics, neuroscience

Octopuses are so clever that they can ignore their genetic programming, in turn slowing down their DNA evolution.

Read more

Apr 11, 2017

Liz Parrish — Human of the Future

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, genetics, life extension

New one from Liz.


Full Video ► https://goo.gl/tHvTF5
BioViva ► http://bioviva-science.com

Continue reading “Liz Parrish — Human of the Future” »

Apr 9, 2017

These Species Can Recode Their Own Genetics

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, neuroscience

Technically, an animal could use RNA editing to change the nature of its proteins without completely altering the underlying DNA instructions. This makes the cephalopods’ ability to do it a very interesting phenomenon, but it’s unclear as to why the species requires this much RNA editing. Many of the edited proteins were found in the animals’ brains, which is why scientists think the editing and their brainpower could be linked.


More than any other species on earth, octopuses are particularly smart—they can solve puzzles, use tools, and communicate using color. Now scientists are saying they’re also capable of editing their RNA.

A team of scientists led by Joshua Rosenthal at the Marine Biological Laboratory and Noa Liscovitch-Braur and Eli Eisenberg at Tel Aviv University have discovered that octopuses and squid are capable of a type of genetic alteration called RNA editing. The process is rare among other species, leading scientists to believe that the cephalopods have evolved to follow a special kind of gene recoding.

Continue reading “These Species Can Recode Their Own Genetics” »

Apr 8, 2017

Scientists Have Pinpointed the Annoying Genetic Mutation That Turns Us Into Night Owls

Posted by in category: genetics

Carriers of the mutation are essentially playing catch-up for their entire lives.


Any night owls reading this will be familiar with the struggle of constantly trying to fit into a morning person’s world. And now researchers say they’ve finally identified the genetic typo that causes this social jetlag.

A new study has revealed that many people who stay up late and struggle to wake up in the morning aren’t lazy, their internal clock is simply genetically programmed to run between 2 and 2.5 hours slower than the rest of the population, thanks to a mutation in a body clock gene called CRY1.

Continue reading “Scientists Have Pinpointed the Annoying Genetic Mutation That Turns Us Into Night Owls” »

Page 1 of 6112345678Last