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Archive for the ‘3D printing’ category

Apr 25, 2019

German scientists create see-through human ORGANS in step toward 3D-printed body parts

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical, neuroscience

German scientists create see-through ORGANS in a step toward 3D-printed parts that could be transplanted in the human body…


Researchers in Germany have created transparent human organs using a new technology that could pave the way to print three-dimensional body parts such as kidneys for transplants.

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Apr 23, 2019

2D stacking method could make 3D-printed organs viable

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioprinting, biotech/medical, robotics/AI

In an effort to scale up the manufacture of biomaterials, researchers at UC Berkeley have combined bioprinting, a robotic arm, and flash freezing in a method that may one day allow living tissue, and even whole organs, to be printed on demand. By printing cells into 2D sheets and then freezing them as assembled, the new technique improves cell survival during both building and storage.

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Apr 20, 2019

3D molding

Posted by in category: 3D printing

Forget 3D-printing, molding is where it’s at.

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Apr 18, 2019

Dr. Doris Taylor — Texas Heart Institute — IdeaXme — Ira Pastor — “How to Build a New Heart”

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, aging, bioengineering, biotech/medical, chemistry, cryonics, DNA, genetics, health, life extension

Apr 18, 2019

Metamaterials Embedded with Geometrical Optics Could Simplify Optical Devices

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, materials

The researchers believe that other MEGOs that absorb, enhance, reflect, or bend waves in new ways could be created using patterned 3D printing. The current Tufts study utilizes stereolithography. Other 3D-printing technologies, such as two-photon polymerization, could provide printing resolution down to 200 nm, which would enable the fabrication of even finer metamaterials that could detect and manipulate electromagnetic signals of even smaller wavelengths, potentially including visible light. As resolution in 3D printing improves, MEGO devices could reach terahertz frequencies.


MEDFORD, Mass., April 9, 2019 — 3D-printed metamaterials developed by a Tufts University engineering team display properties not found in conventional materials. The fabrication methods used by the team demonstrate how stereolithography-based 3D printers can be used to create 3D optical devices through a process that fuses metamaterials with geometrical optics, or MEGO. The MEGO devices can be fabricated at a lower cost than devices made using typical fabrication methods.

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Apr 15, 2019

Israeli scientists unveil world’s first 3D-printed heart with human tissue

Posted by in category: 3D printing

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Apr 9, 2019

3D printed tires and shoes that self-repair

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, chemistry, life extension, robotics/AI

Instead of throwing away your broken boots or cracked toys, why not let them fix themselves? Researchers at the University of Southern California Viterbi School of Engineering have developed 3D-printed rubber materials that can do just that.

Assistant Professor Qiming Wang works in the world of 3D printed materials, creating new functions for a variety of purposes, from flexible electronics to sound control. Now, working with Viterbi students Kunhao Yu, An Xin, and Haixu Du, and University of Connecticut Assistant Professor Ying Li, they have made a new material that can be manufactured quickly and is able to repair itself if it becomes fractured or punctured. This material could be game-changing for industries like shoes, tires, soft robotics, and even electronics, decreasing manufacturing time while increasing product durability and longevity.

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Apr 8, 2019

The Galaxy S10’s fingerprint reader was thwarted by a 3D printer

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, privacy

It could take someone just 15 minutes to print a viable fake biometric marker.

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Apr 7, 2019

3D Printed Implants and Stem Cells Helped Paralyzed Rats Walk Again

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical

The implant acted like scaffolding to bridge over spinal cord injuries.

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Apr 5, 2019

The promise

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical

One of the research’s lead investigators, Michael Hill, said in a press release, “We envision this new technique as a low-cost office procedure done under local anesthesia. The whole process would take about five minutes.”

While currently in the process of arranging licensing for their procedure, the researchers are already looking toward using it with other collagen tissue such as tendons, and even corneas for the correction of vision issues. In animal tests, they’ve already had some success with reshaping a cornea using a 3D-printed contact lens painted with electrodes and to which they applied electrical current to soften the cornea. This is especially exciting due to the structure of its collagen fibers. Says Hill during the presentation, “It turns out that in order to remain transparent, the [layers of] collagen fibers are all perfectly aligned.” Molecular surgery allows correction of the cornea without disrupting that required layering.

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