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Archive for the ‘3D printing’ category

Aug 15, 2019

3D-printed edible pill can scan the gut microbiome

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical, food

A biocompatible and battery-less pill can noninvasively and accurately sample gut microbiome as it passes through the gastrointestinal tract.

Aug 15, 2019

Generative Design: Alien Parts from Natural Evolution

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, energy, evolution, mathematics

We’re only a handful of months away from the year 2020, and with the way parts look and tech acts, it finally feels like we’re entering the future. It’s a future crafted by sophisticated 3D printers and machining centers, using materials provided by global-reaching supply chains and connected to an exponential rate of new superpowered gadgets. Nowadays, there’s really no reason to think any manufacturing feat is impossible. If something doesn’t exist, it’s just that we haven’t figured it out yet.

And this futuristic techtopia brimming with potential wouldn’t be possible if not for engineers—those dedicated, uber-creative folks plotting such a course, continuously improving the world around through the super power of… math.

Mathematics has been the indispensable fuel to make the impossible possible since at least the ancient Egyptians more than four thousand years ago. The Great Pyramid of Giza is the world’s oldest monument to its power. Amazingly, its geometrical elegance was calculated on papyrus scrolls, most of which have turned to dust long ago. Yet the universal language of math still speaks through its dimensions. And it will continue to do so for time immemorial.

Aug 14, 2019

3D-printing organs moves a few more steps closer to commercialization

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical

New successes in printing vascular tissue from living cells point to the accelerating pace of development of 3D-printing tissue — and eventually the ability to manufacture organs from small samples of cells.

Late last month Prellis Biologics announced an $8.7 million round of funding and some significant advancements that point the way forward for 3D-printed organs while a company called Volumetric Bio based on research from a slew of different universities unveiled significant progress of its own earlier this year.

Continue reading “3D-printing organs moves a few more steps closer to commercialization” »

Aug 9, 2019

Revolutionary Military Technology | The Military Tech Show | Spark

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, military

With exclusive access, this eye-opening series reveals the latest military innovations which are shaping the present and future of the armed forces. Each informative episode features must-see inventions and life-saving gadgets.

This episode shows how simulations are giving RAF pilots the winning edge, how the revolutionary X-Plane blends fixed wing and helicopter technology and how 3D printing is becoming a world-changing industry.

Continue reading “Revolutionary Military Technology | The Military Tech Show | Spark” »

Aug 6, 2019

Scientists create blinking human eye replica on a chip

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical

An eye for a 3D-printed eye.

Aug 5, 2019

3D bioprinting breakthrough leads to full-scale, functioning heart parts

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioprinting, biotech/medical

While in its early stages, bioprinting of human tissue is an emerging technology that is opening up some exciting possibilities, including the potential to one day 3D print entire human organs. This scientific objective has now grown a little bit closer, with researchers at Carnegie Mellon University reporting a breakthrough that enabled the printing of full-scale heart components that in some cases functioned similarly to the real thing.

Aug 2, 2019

3D printing the human heart

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioengineering, bioprinting, biotech/medical

Over 4000 patients in the United States alone are waiting for a heart transplant, while millions of others worldwide need hearts but are ineligible for the waitlist. The need for replacement organs is immense, and new approaches are needed to engineer artificial organs that are capable of repairing, supplementing, or replacing long-term organ function.


A team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University has published a paper in Science that details a new technique allowing anyone to 3D bioprint tissue scaffolds out of collagen, the major structural protein in the human body. This first-of-its-kind method brings the field of tissue engineering one step closer to being able to 3D print a full-sized, adult human heart.

The technique, known as Freeform Reversible Embedding of Suspended Hydrogels (FRESH), has allowed the researchers to overcome many challenges associated with existing 3D bioprinting methods, and to achieve unprecedented resolution and fidelity using soft and living materials.

Continue reading “3D printing the human heart” »

Aug 1, 2019

MIT’s Dr. Robert Langer — The “Edison of Medicine” — ideaXme Show — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, aging, bioengineering, biotech/medical, business, disruptive technology, DNA, futurism, health, life extension

Jul 31, 2019

A technique called Hybrid 3D Printing

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, materials

A technique called Hybrid 3D Printing, developed by AFRL researchers in collaboration with the Wyss Institute at Harvard University, uses additive manufacturing to integrate soft, conductive inks with material substrates to create stretchable electronic devices. A potential application is to create sensors to enable better human performance monitoring. (Courtesy photo/Harvard Wyss Institute)

https://www.wpafb.af.mil/…/afrl-harvard-researchers-invent…/

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Jul 28, 2019

A 3D-Printable Mecanum Wheeled Robot Platform

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, robotics/AI

If your interest lies with robotics there are a multitude of different platforms for you to build. [Teemu Laurila] was frustrated with what was on offer, so designed his own with four-wheel double wishbone suspension and mecanum wheels for maximum flexibility.

It’s a design that has been through multiple revisions since its first iteration in 2015, and along the way it’s clear some thought has gone into it. That double wishbone suspension features an angle for a high ground clearance, and is fully sprung. Drive comes from small motor/gearboxes at each axle. The chassis meanwhile has plenty of space for a single-board computer, and has been specifically designed with the BeagleBone Black in mind.

This build isn’t fully DIY, as the mecanum wheels appear to be off-the-shelf items, but the rest of the project makes up for this. If you need to make your own, it’s hardly as though there aren’t any projects from which you can borrow components.

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