Blog

Archive for the ‘3D printing’ category

Aug 13, 2018

3D printed biomaterials for bone tissue engineering

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioengineering, bioprinting, biotech/medical, life extension

When skeletal defects are unable to heal on their own, bone tissue engineering (BTE), a developing field in orthopedics can combine materials science, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine to facilitate bone repair. Materials scientists aim to engineer an ideal biomaterial that can mimic natural bone with cost-effective manufacturing techniques to provide a framework that offers support and biodegrades as new bone forms. Since applications in BTE to restore large bone defects are yet to cross over from the laboratory bench to clinical practice, the field is active with burgeoning research efforts and pioneering technology.

Cost-effective three-dimensional (3D) printing (additive manufacturing) combines economical techniques to create scaffolds with bioinks. Bioengineers at the Pennsylvania State University recently developed a composite ink made of three materials to 3D print porous, -like constructs. The core materials, polycaprolactone (PCL) and poly (D, L-lactic-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA), are two of the most commonly used synthetic, biocompatible biomaterials in BTE. Now published in the Journal of Materials Research, the materials showed biologically favorable interactions in the laboratory, followed by positive outcomes of in an animal model in vivo.

Since bone is a complex structure, Moncal et al. developed a bioink made of biocompatible PCL, PLGA and hydroxyapatite (HAps) particles, combining the properties of bone-like mechanical strength, biodegradation and guided reparative growth (osteoconduction) for assisted natural bone repair. They then engineered a new custom-designed mechanical extrusion system, which was mounted on the Multi-Arm Bioprinter (MABP), previously developed by the same group, to manufacture the 3D constructs.

Continue reading “3D printed biomaterials for bone tissue engineering” »

Aug 12, 2018

UCLan unveils world’s first graphene skinned plane

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, business, engineering, nanotechnology, robotics/AI, transportation

The University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) has unveiled the world’s first graphene skinned plane at an internationally renowned air show. Juno, a three-and-a-half-metre wide graphene skinned aircraft, was revealed on the North West Aerospace Alliance (NWAA) stand as part of the ‘Futures Day’ at Farnborough Air Show 2018.

The University’s aerospace engineering team has worked in partnership with the Sheffield Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC), the University of Manchester’s National Graphene Institute (NGI), Haydale Graphene Industries (Haydale) and a range of other businesses to develop the unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), which also includes graphene batteries and 3D printed parts.

Billy Beggs, UCLan’s Engineering Innovation Manager, said: The industry reaction to Juno at Farnborough was superb with many positive comments about the work we’re doing. Having Juno at one the world’s biggest air shows demonstrates the great strides we’re making in leading a programme to accelerate the uptake of graphene and other nano-materials into industry.

Continue reading “UCLan unveils world’s first graphene skinned plane” »

Aug 10, 2018

3D-Printed Device Could Repair Spinal Damage

Posted by in category: 3D printing

Read more

Aug 4, 2018

Looking at Wind Turbines From a Different Angle

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, sustainability

When we think of wind turbines, the first thing that usually comes to mind is the typical Sim City-esque type – 3 blades, gigantic, and wired into the municipal power grid. In truth, the world of wind power generation is far more varied indeed – as [Vittorio]’s vertical-axis wind turbine shows us.

So what exactly is a vertical-axis wind turbine, you ask? Well, rather than the typical setup with blades rotating about a horizontal axis, as in typical utility turbines or a classic electric fan you might use to cool off on a sunny day, instead a vertical axis is used. This necessitates a very different blade design due to the orientation of the rotational axis relative to the flow, so such turbines can be quite visually striking to those unfamiliar with such designs.

Continue reading “Looking at Wind Turbines From a Different Angle” »

Aug 3, 2018

Joris Column: Printcrime, augmenting humans, nanoconvergence and Segway polo

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical, cyborgs, habitats, transhumanism

Often only a few years separate the tinfoil hats from the millionaires to be. I was writing the piece on the Youbionic arm and thinking of how we will use 3D printing to augment human beings. Clearly augmenting the human body with mechatronics would be a good idea. The flesh is weak but stepper motors are strong! Oh how we will eeck, ooow, brrrr whine in our old stepper augmented age. Machines could very well fill the gaps once our bodies start failing us. But, will old people homes really be filled with Borg grandmas?

Continue reading “Joris Column: Printcrime, augmenting humans, nanoconvergence and Segway polo” »

Jul 30, 2018

Allevi, Made in Space team up to develop first 3D bioprinter in space

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioprinting, education, space

3D bioprinting company Allevi has teamed up with California-based 3D printing and space technology firm Made In Space to develop the Allevi ZeroG – the first 3D bioprinter capable of working in low-gravity conditions.

Allevi (formerly BioBots) was founded in 2014 by University of Pennsylvania graduates Ricardo Solorzano and Daniel Cabrera. At the time, the ambitious duo set out to develop an accessible desktop bioprinting system which could be used for a wide variety of research and educational applications.

Continue reading “Allevi, Made in Space team up to develop first 3D bioprinter in space” »

Jul 30, 2018

Self-healing graphene could make robots that fix themselves with water

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, robotics/AI

Adding graphene to a gel makes a 3D-printable substance that dries to be strong and conductive and heals when wet.

Read more

Jul 29, 2018

This 3D-printed AI construct analyzes

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, mathematics, robotics/AI

Machine learning is everywhere these days, but it’s usually more or less invisible: it sits in the background, optimizing audio or picking out faces in images. But this new system is not only visible, but physical: it performs AI-type analysis not by crunching numbers, but by bending light. It’s weird and unique, but counter-intuitively, it’s an excellent demonstration of how deceptively simple these “artificial intelligence” systems are.

Machine learning systems, which we frequently refer to as a form of artificial intelligence, at their heart are just a series of calculations made on a set of data, each building on the last or feeding back into a loop. The calculations themselves aren’t particularly complex — though they aren’t the kind of math you’d want to do with a pen and paper. Ultimately all that simple math produces a probability that the data going in is a match for various patterns it has “learned” to recognize.

The thing is, though, that once these “layers” have been “trained” and the math finalized, in many ways it’s performing the same calculations over and over again. Usually that just means it can be optimized and won’t take up that much space or CPU power. But researchers from UCLA show that it can literally be solidified, the layers themselves actual 3D-printed layers of transparent material, imprinted with complex diffraction patterns that do to light going through them what the math would have done to numbers.

Continue reading “This 3D-printed AI construct analyzes” »

Jul 28, 2018

4 Billion New Minds Online: The Coming Era of Connectivity

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, internet

As 5G electrifies a world of trillions of sensors and devices, we’re about to live in a world where anyone anywhere can have access to the world’s knowledge, crowdfund ready capital across 8 billion potential investors, and 3D print on the cloud.

And as the population of online users doubles, we’re about to witness perhaps the most historic acceleration of progress and technological innovation known to man.

Abundance Digital Online Community: I have created a digital/online community of bold, abundance-minded entrepreneurs called Abundance Digital. This is my “onramp” for exponential entrepreneurs—those who want to get involved and play at a higher level. Click here to learn more.

Continue reading “4 Billion New Minds Online: The Coming Era of Connectivity” »

Jul 26, 2018

NASA-awarded ‘marsha’, a 3D-printed vertical martian habitat

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, habitats, robotics/AI, space

3D printing refers to various processes used to manufacture three dimensional objects in successive layers of material formed under computer control.

NASA-awarded ‘marsha’, a 3D-printed vertical Martian habitat by AI spacefactory.

Continue reading “NASA-awarded ‘marsha’, a 3D-printed vertical martian habitat” »

Page 1 of 6912345678Last