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Archive for the ‘security’ category

Aug 2, 2021

PwnedPiper PTS Security Flaws Threaten 80% of Hospitals in the U.S.

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, security

PwnedPiper pneumatic tube system (PTS) security flaws threaten 80% of Hospitals in the U.S.

Jul 30, 2021

Barry Dean, CEO, LUCI — Making Power Wheelchairs Smarter

Posted by in categories: education, media & arts, security

Making Power Wheelchair Technologies “Smarter” — Barry Dean, CEO, LUCI


Barry Dean is an award-winning songwriter turned smart wheelchair technology company founder.

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Jul 29, 2021

Austin’s Silicon Labs sells business unit for $2.75 billion, shifts focus to Internet of Things

Posted by in categories: business, computing, food, internet, security

Austin-based Silicon Labs has sold its infrastructure and automotive business for $2.75 billion to California-based semiconductor maker Skyworks Solutions. Plans for the all-cash deal was initially announced in April.

Silicon Labs primarily designs semiconductors and other silicon devices. CEO Tyson Tuttle said the deal will allow the company to focus on its growing Internet of Things business. Internet of Things, or IoT as it is known in industry shorthand, refers to a range of non-computing devices —from kitchen devices to security systems — that connect to the Internet.

Silcon Labs’ IoT business already serves tens of thousands of customers and works in thousands of applications, but the deal narrows Silicon Labs focus exclusively to that technology.

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Jul 25, 2021

With jobkeeper back on the table, it’s once again a good time to talk about how we should deal with welfare as a country

Posted by in categories: economics, policy, security

We hand out cash freely to some people, while we plague others with fraudulent debt notices that may cripple financially, with dire ultimate consequences.

There is a case to be made for a universal basic income (UBI) — an unconditional payment to everyone that ensures the basics of life are catered for. It may give people security to leave a bad situation, or freedom to pursue a new future. No conditions means no bureaucracy, which improves productivity and efficiency, and the universal nature of UBI means even conservatives can get on board.

But how to afford such a payment? Surely giving away free money would blow the budget?

Continue reading “With jobkeeper back on the table, it’s once again a good time to talk about how we should deal with welfare as a country” »

Jul 23, 2021

Mind the gap: State-of-the-art technologies and applications for EEG-based brain–computer interfaces

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, education, law, neuroscience, security, wearables

Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) provide bidirectional communication between the brain and output devices that translate user intent into function. Among the different brain imaging techniques used to operate BCIs, electroencephalography (EEG) constitutes the preferred method of choice, owing to its relative low cost, ease of use, high temporal resolution, and noninvasiveness. In recent years, significant progress in wearable technologies and computational intelligence has greatly enhanced the performance and capabilities of EEG-based BCIs (eBCIs) and propelled their migration out of the laboratory and into real-world environments. This rapid translation constitutes a paradigm shift in human–machine interaction that will deeply transform different industries in the near future, including healthcare and wellbeing, entertainment, security, education, and marketing. In this contribution, the state-of-the-art in wearable biosensing is reviewed, focusing on the development of novel electrode interfaces for long term and noninvasive EEG monitoring. Commercially available EEG platforms are surveyed, and a comparative analysis is presented based on the benefits and limitations they provide for eBCI development. Emerging applications in neuroscientific research and future trends related to the widespread implementation of eBCIs for medical and nonmedical uses are discussed. Finally, a commentary on the ethical, social, and legal concerns associated with this increasingly ubiquitous technology is provided, as well as general recommendations to address key issues related to mainstream consumer adoption.

Jul 22, 2021

Apple Issues Urgent iPhone Updates, But Not for Pegasus Zero-Day

Posted by in categories: mobile phones, security

Update now: The ream of bugs includes some remotely exploitable code execution flaws. Still to come: a fix for what makes iPhones easy prey for Pegasus spyware.

IPhone users, drop what you’re doing and update now: Apple has issued a warning about a ream of code-execution vulnerabilities – some of which are remotely exploitable – and experts are emphatically recommending an ASAP update to version 14.7 of iOS and iPadOS.

Unfortunately, you aren’t getting a fix for the flaw that makes your iPhones easy prey for Pegasus spyware. As headlines have focused on all week, a zero-click zero-day in Apple’s iMessage feature is being exploited by NSO Group’s notorious Pegasus mobile spyware: A spyware blitz enabled by a bug that has given the security community pause about the security of Apple’s closed ecosystem.

Jul 17, 2021

China Wants a Chip Machine From the Dutch. The U.S. Said No

Posted by in categories: government, mobile phones, robotics/AI, security

The chip world’s most important machines are made near corn fields in the Netherlands. The U.S. is trying to block China from buying them.


The one-of-a-kind, 180-ton machines are used by companies including Intel Corp., South Korea’s Samsung Electronics Co. and leading Apple Inc. supplier Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. to make the chips in everything from cutting-edge smartphones and 5G cellular equipment to computers used for artificial intelligence.

China wants the $150-million machines for domestic chip makers, so smartphone giant Huawei Technologies Co. and other Chinese tech companies can be less reliant on foreign suppliers. But ASML hasn’t sent a single one because the Netherlands—under pressure from the U.S.—is withholding an export license to China.

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Jul 16, 2021

Quantum random number generator sets benchmark for size, performance

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, quantum physics, security

As pervasive as they are in everyday uses, like encryption and security, randomly generated digital numbers are seldom truly random.

So far, only bulky, relatively slow quantum random generators (QRNGs) can achieve levels of randomness on par with the basic laws of quantum physics, but researchers are looking to make these devices faster and more portable.

In Applied Physics Letters, scientists from China present the fastest real-time QRNG to date to make the devices quicker and more portable. The device combines a state-of-the-art photonic integrated with optimized real-time postprocessing for extracting randomness from quantum entropy source of vacuum states.

Jul 11, 2021

3,800 PS4s found and seized from a cryptocurrency farm in Ukraine

Posted by in categories: computing, cryptocurrencies, security, sustainability

WTF?! On Thursday the Security Service of Ukraine (SSU) reported that they had shut down a cryptomining operation in the city of Vinnytsia, seizing over 500 GPUs and 50 processors — and a bunch of Playstation 4s. Consoles built on 2013-era technology might not be great at mining, but they don’t need to be when you have 3800 of them.

Although the market for GPUs is starting to improve, and dedicated ASICs might be on the way to relieve demand, it seems that one group of enterprising cryptocurrency miners have turned to last-gen console hardware to get things done.

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Jul 10, 2021

Researchers have taught a drone to recognize and hunt down meteorites autonomously

Posted by in categories: drones, robotics/AI, security

Planetary scientists estimate that each year, about 500 meteorites survive the fiery trip through Earth’s atmosphere and fall to our planet’s surface. Most are quite small, and less than 2% of them are ever recovered. While the majority of rocks from space may not be recoverable due to ending up in oceans or remote, inaccessible areas, other meteorite falls are just not witnessed or known about.

But new technology has upped the number known falls in recent years. Doppler radar has detected meteorite falls, as well as all-sky camera networks specifically on the lookout for meteors. Additionally, increased use of dashcams and security cameras have allowed for more serendipitous sightings and data on fireballs and potential meteorite falls.

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