Menu

Blog

Archive for the ‘quantum physics’ category: Page 4

Dec 12, 2021

Breakthrough Proof Clears Path for Quantum AI — Overcoming Threat of “Barren Plateaus”

Posted by in categories: quantum physics, robotics/AI

Novel theorem demonstrates convolutional neural networks can always be trained on quantum computers, overcoming threat of ‘barren plateaus’ in optimization problems.

Convolutional neural networks running on quantum computers have generated significant buzz for their potential to analyze quantum data better than classical computers can. While a fundamental solvability problem known as “barren plateaus” has limited the application of these neural networks for large data sets, new research overcomes that Achilles heel with a rigorous proof that guarantees scalability.

“The way you construct a quantum neural network can lead to a barren plateau—or not,” said Marco Cerezo, coauthor of the paper titled “Absence of Barren Plateaus in Quantum Convolutional Neural Networks,” published recently by a Los Alamos National Laboratory team in Physical Review X. Cerezo is a physicist specializing in quantum computing 0, quantum machine learning, and quantum information at Los Alamos. “We proved the absence of barren plateaus for a special type of quantum neural network. Our work provides trainability guarantees for this architecture, meaning that one can generically train its parameters.”

Continue reading “Breakthrough Proof Clears Path for Quantum AI — Overcoming Threat of ‘Barren Plateaus’” »

Dec 12, 2021

DeepMind debuts a massive language A.I. that beats GPT-3 on some tasks

Posted by in categories: quantum physics, robotics/AI

The company belatedly gets into the race to build bigger, better language models despite ethical concerns.


A team at Harvard has documented a new state of matter which could advance quantum technology.

Dec 12, 2021

Never before seen state of matter could advance quantum tech

Posted by in categories: particle physics, quantum physics

Physicists from Harvard University have documented a new state of matter which could significantly advance quantum technology, according to a new paper published in the peer-reviewed journal Science earlier this month.

The state of matter they found is called quantum spin liquid, which has special properties that produce long-range quantum entanglement — a phenomenon in which particles’ states are connected even when the particles are separated by distance.

Quantum spin liquid was first predicted by physicist Philip W. Anderson about 50 years ago, in 1973, but has never been observed in experiments.

Continue reading “Never before seen state of matter could advance quantum tech” »

Dec 12, 2021

Pitt Scientists who Regrew Retina Cells to Restore Vision in Tiny Fish set their Sights on Humans

Posted by in category: quantum physics

(PhysOrg.com) — By greatly amplifying one photon from an entangled photon pair, physicists have theoretically shown that human eyes can be used as detectors to observe quantum effects. Usually, detecting quantum phenomena requires sensitive photon detectors or similar technology, keeping the quantum world far removed from our everyday experience. By showing that it’s possible to perform quantum optics experiments with human eyes as detectors, the physicists can bring quantum phenomena closer to the macroscopic level and to everyday life.

Dec 12, 2021

Physicists Explain How Human Eyes Can Detect Quantum Effects

Posted by in category: quantum physics

(PhysOrg.com) — By greatly amplifying one photon from an entangled photon pair, physicists have theoretically shown that human eyes can be used as detectors to observe quantum effects. Usually, detecting quantum phenomena requires sensitive photon detectors or similar technology, keeping the quantum world far removed from our everyday experience. By showing that it’s possible to perform quantum optics experiments with human eyes as detectors, the physicists can bring quantum phenomena closer to the macroscopic level and to everyday life.

The group of physicists is from the University of Geneva, and includes Pavel Sekatski, Nicolas Brunner (also from the University of Bristol), Cyril Branciard, Nicolas Gisin, and Christoph Simon. In their study published in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters, the scientists theoretically show how human eyes can be used to detect a large Bell inequality violation, which proves the existence of .

As the physicists explain, the key to achieving detection of quantum effects is to use the process of quantum cloning by stimulated emission. Recently, using quantum cloning, researchers in Rome have experimentally created tens of thousands of clones starting from a single-photon. Then, by amplifying one photon of an entangled pair, the researchers managed to demonstrate entanglement. In order to do this, specific detectors are required, which can distinguish two orthogonal amplified states with a high success rate.

Dec 12, 2021

Towards quantum 2.0 technology: where the best opportunities for business lie

Posted by in categories: business, computing, encryption, mobile phones, quantum physics

James McKenzie is excited about the prospects of firms that are developing technology based on seemingly esoteric fundamental quantum phenomena.

Physicists have long boasted of their success in what’s known as “quantum 1.0” technology – semiconductor junctions, transistors, lasers and so on. Thanks to their efforts over the last 75 years, we have smart phones, computers, laptops and other quantum-enabled devices that have transformed our lives. But the future will increasingly depend on “quantum 2.0” technology, which taps into phenomena like superposition and entanglement to permit everything from quantum computing and cryptography to quantum sensing, timing and imaging.

The incredible possibilities of quantum 2.0 were brought home to me when I attended the UK’s National Quantum Technologies Showcase in central London last month. The event featured more than 60 exhibitors and I was amazed how far things have progressed. In fact, it coincided with two positive developments. One was an announcement by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) of a further £50m to support quantum industrial projects. The other was the UK and US signing a joint “statement of intent” to boost collaboration on quantum science and technologies.

Continue reading “Towards quantum 2.0 technology: where the best opportunities for business lie” »

Dec 12, 2021

Intel targets 30% to 50% logic scaling improvements beyond 2025 with 3D stacked transistors, Foveros Direct

Posted by in categories: mobile phones, quantum physics, robotics/AI

What’s New: In its relentless pursuit of Moore’s Law, Intel is unveiling key packaging, transistor and quantum physics breakthroughs fundamental to advancing and accelerating computing well into the next decade. At IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting (IEDM) 2021, Intel outlined its path toward more than 10x interconnect density improvement in packaging with hybrid bonding, 30% to 50% area improvement in transistor scaling, major breakthroughs in new power and memory technologies, and new concepts in physics that may one day revolutionize computing.

“At Intel, the research and innovation necessary for advancing Moore’s Law never stops. Our Components Research Group is sharing key research breakthroughs at IEDM 2021 in bringing revolutionary process and packaging technologies to meet the insatiable demand for powerful computing that our industry and society depend on. This is the result of our best scientists’ and engineers’ tireless work. They continue to be at the forefront of innovations for continuing Moore’s Law.” –Robert Chau, Intel Senior Fellow and general manager of Components Research

Why It Matters: Moore’s Law has been tracking innovations in computing that meet the demands of every technology generation from mainframes to mobile phones. This evolution is continuing today as we move into a new era of computing with unlimited data and artificial intelligence.

Continue reading “Intel targets 30% to 50% logic scaling improvements beyond 2025 with 3D stacked transistors, Foveros Direct” »

Dec 12, 2021

What can Google’s army of robots do?| Physicists have turned back time | High Tech News

Posted by in categories: cyborgs, drones, Elon Musk, governance, quantum physics, robotics/AI, space, sustainability

✅ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pro_robots.

You are on the PRO Robots channel and in this form we present you with high-tech news. What can Google’s army of robots really do? Can time turn backwards? Catapult rockets and a jet engine powered by plastic waste. All this and much more in one edition of high-tech news! Watch the video until the end and write your impressions about the new army of robots from Google in the comments.

Continue reading “What can Google’s army of robots do?| Physicists have turned back time | High Tech News” »

Dec 11, 2021

A new super-cooled microwave source boosts the scale-up of quantum computers

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Researchers in Finland have developed a circuit that produces the high-quality microwave signals required to control quantum computers while operating at temperatures near absolute zero. This is a key step towards moving the control system closer to the quantum processor, which may make it possible to greatly increase the number of qubits in the processor.

One of the factors limiting the size of quantum computers is the mechanism used to control the qubits in quantum processors. This is normally accomplished using a series of pulses, and because quantum processors operate at temperatures near absolute zero, the control pulses are normally brought into the cooled environment via broadband cables from room temperature.

As the number of qubits grows, so does the number of cables needed. This limits the potential size of a quantum , because the refrigerators cooling the qubits would have to become larger to accommodate more and more cables while also working harder to cool them down—ultimately a losing proposition.

Dec 11, 2021

The US is worried that hackers are stealing data today so quantum computers can crack it in a decade

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, government, information science, quantum physics

While they wrestle with the immediate danger posed by hackers today, US government officials are preparing for another, longer-term threat: attackers who are collecting sensitive, encrypted data now in the hope that they’ll be able to unlock it at some point in the future.

The threat comes from quantum computers, which work very differently from the classical computers we use today. Instead of the traditional bits made of 1s and 0s, they use quantum bits that can represent different values at the same time. The complexity of quantum computers could make them much faster at certain tasks, allowing them to solve problems that remain practically impossible for modern machines—including breaking many of the encryption algorithms currently used to protect sensitive data such as personal, trade, and state secrets.

While quantum computers are still in their infancy, incredibly expensive and fraught with problems, officials say efforts to protect the country from this long-term danger need to begin right now.

Continue reading “The US is worried that hackers are stealing data today so quantum computers can crack it in a decade” »

Page 4 of 41312345678Last