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Archive for the ‘quantum physics’ category: Page 6

Sep 7, 2019

Dave Bacon: Google Quantum Computing Beyond Swag

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, quantum physics

A talk by Dave Bacon during the Industry session of the 14th Conference on the Theory of Quantum Computation, Communication and Cryptography (TQC 2019), Day 3. TQC 2019 was hosted June 3–5, 2019 by the Joint Center for Quantum Information and Computer Science at the University of Maryland (QuICS). More information about TQC can be found at https://www.tqcconference.org.

Sep 7, 2019

Simulating quantum many-body systems on Amazon Web Services

Posted by in categories: mathematics, particle physics, quantum physics

Quantum many-body systems (QMBs), which are physical systems made up of multiple interacting particles, are among the most challenging structures to reproduce in numerical simulations. In the past, researchers have attempted to simulate these systems using a variety of techniques, including Monte Carlo simulations and even exact diagonalizations.

Methods involving networks (TNs), mathematical concepts that can be applied in a variety of scientific fields, have also shown some potential for the simulation of QMBs. However, so far, these techniques have only been successfully applied to small systems or those with a simple geometry.

In a recent study, researchers at the University of Central Florida were able to simulate QMBs on Amazon Web Services using a TN-based method. Their paper, pre-published on arXiv, highlights some of the potential advantages and implications of using for research purposes.

Sep 7, 2019

Scientists were hunting for dark matter… then this happened

Posted by in categories: cosmology, particle physics, quantum physics

Elements is more than just a science show. It’s your science-loving best friend, tasked with keeping you updated and interested on all the compelling, innovative and groundbreaking science happening all around us. Join our passionate hosts as they help break down and present fascinating science, from quarks to quantum theory and beyond.

Sep 6, 2019

Scientists couple magnetization to superconductivity for quantum discoveries

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Quantum computing promises to revolutionize the ways in which scientists can process and manipulate information. The physical and material underpinnings for quantum technologies are still being explored, and researchers continue to look for new ways in which information can be manipulated and exchanged at the quantum level.

Sep 6, 2019

Building Quantum Skills With Tools For Developers, Researchers and Educators

Posted by in categories: computing, education, quantum physics

Our team is committed to making quantum sciences more approachable by investing heavily in the education to support this growing community and establishing the emerging technology as the next generation of computing. We need more students, educators, developers, and domain experts with “quantum ready” skills. This is why our team is proud to release educational resources and tools, while also increasing the capacity and capability of our IBM Q systems.

Learn Quantum Computing Using Qiskit - textbook title
We are rolling out new systems and a new feature that allows for reserving time on an IBM Q system through the IBM Q Experience. This will initially be available to members of the IBM Q Network. Members will be able to reserve blocks of uninterrupted time for their users to experiment and test ideas using our advanced systems and software. Moreover, educators and academic members can take advantage of scheduling time to dynamically demonstrate quantum computing concepts on our hardware in the classroom. All the while, students can use the IBM Q Experience to follow along directly from a web browser without any additional installation required.

Continue reading “Building Quantum Skills With Tools For Developers, Researchers and Educators” »

Sep 6, 2019

How the United States Is Developing Post-Quantum Cryptography

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, government, information science, internet, quantum physics, security

When practical quantum computing finally arrives, it will have the power to crack the standard digital codes that safeguard online privacy and security for governments, corporations, and virtually everyone who uses the Internet. That’s why a U.S. government agency has challenged researchers to develop a new generation of quantum-resistant cryptographic algorithms.

Many experts don ’t expect a quantum computer capable of performing the complex calculations required to crack modern cryptography standards to become a reality within the next 10 years. But the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) wants to stay ahead by getting new cryptographic standards ready by 2022. The agency is overseeing the second phase of its Post-Quantum Cryptography Standardization Process to narrow down the best candidates for quantum-resistant algorithms that can replace modern cryptography.

“Currently intractable computational problems that protect widely-deployed cryptosystems, such as RSA and Elliptic Curve-based schemes, are expected to become solvable,” says Rafael Misoczki, a cryptographer at the Intel Corporation and a member of two teams (named Bike and Classic McEliece) involved in the NIST process. “This means that quantum computers have the potential to eventually break most secure communications on the planet.”

Sep 6, 2019

James Strole: Advocacy, Education, Awareness About Radical Life Extension

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, education, life extension, quantum physics

Ira Pastor, ideaXme longevity and aging ambassador and founder of Bioquark, interviews James Strole, Co-Founder and Co-Director of People Unlimited and Director of the Coalition For Radical Life Extension.

Ira Pastor Comments:

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Sep 6, 2019

‘Einstein’s Biggest Blunder’ May Have Finally Been Fixed

Posted by in category: quantum physics

The cosmological constant has plagued physicists for more than a century.

Sep 5, 2019

Exotic physics phenomenon is observed for first time

Posted by in categories: computing, mathematics, particle physics, quantum physics

An exotic physical phenomenon, involving optical waves, synthetic magnetic fields, and time reversal, has been directly observed for the first time, following decades of attempts. The new finding could lead to realizations of what are known as topological phases, and eventually to advances toward fault-tolerant quantum computers, the researchers say.

The new finding involves the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm Effect and is reported today in the journal Science by MIT graduate student Yi Yang, MIT visiting scholar Chao Peng (a professor at Peking University), MIT graduate student Di Zhu, Professor Hrvoje Buljan at University of Zagreb in Croatia, Francis Wright Davis Professor of Physics John Joannopoulos at MIT, Professor Bo Zhen at the University of Pennsylvania, and MIT professor of physics Marin Soljacic.

The finding relates to gauge fields, which describe transformations that particles undergo. Gauge fields fall into two classes, known as Abelian and non-Abelian. The Aharonov-Bohm Effect, named after the theorists who predicted it in 1959, confirmed that gauge fields—beyond being a pure mathematical aid—have physical consequences.

Sep 5, 2019

IBM releases quantum computing textbook and video tutorials

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Programming a quantum computer is a rather different discipline than programming on traditional computers.

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