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Archive for the ‘bioengineering’ category: Page 6

Feb 5, 2020

Step aside CRISPR, RNA editing is taking off

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics

But CRISPR editing — at least as a therapeutic technique in people — has turned out to be more difficult than initially thought. Researchers have documented ways that Cas9, one of the enzymes used in CRISPR gene editing, could trigger immune responses, or cause accidental changes to the genome that would be permanent. RNA editing, by contrast, could allow clinicians to make temporary fixes that eliminate mutations in proteins, halt their production or change the way that they work in specific organs and tissues. Because cells quickly degrade unused RNAs, any errors introduced by a therapy would be washed out, rather than staying with a person forever.


Making changes to the molecular messengers that create proteins might offer flexible therapies for cancer, pain or high cholesterol, in addition to genetic disorders.

Feb 3, 2020

DR STEPHEN BADYLAK — Regen Med Strategies for Tissue & Organ Replacement (Long Version)

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, life extension

Regenerative medicine and furthermore tissue engineering are realities for some time but well hidden from the public by msm somehow.


Dr. Stephen Badylak, Director of the Center for Pre-Clinical Tissue Engineering, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

Continue reading “DR STEPHEN BADYLAK — Regen Med Strategies for Tissue & Organ Replacement (Long Version)” »

Feb 2, 2020

Scientists Want to Explore Ocean With “Cyborg Jellyfish”

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, cyborgs

In a trial, the scientists were capable of using electrical jolts from microelectronic controllers to make jellyfish swim not only faster but also more efficiently, according to a paper published in Science Advances today.

“We’ve shown that they’re capable of moving much faster than they normally do, without an undue cost on their metabolism,” said co-author and Stanford bioengineering PhD candidate Nicole Xu, in a statement.

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Feb 2, 2020

How one entrepreneur is tackling humanity’s most pressing problems

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, computing, internet, neuroscience, particle physics

Braintree founder Bryan Johnson, MBA’07, invests in bold ventures on the next frontier.

Bryan Johnson is determined to explore the depths of your mind and help save humanity from its direst threats.

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Jan 31, 2020

Genomics and BioPharma Pioneer!! — Dr. William Haseltine — Biologist, entrepreneur and philanthropist, now focusing on the issues of healthcare costs, dementia care, and aging — ideaXme — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biological, biotech/medical, business, DNA, genetics, life extension, posthumanism, transhumanism

Jan 31, 2020

From Blood to Bone (and Back)! — Dr. Rhonda Prisby — University of Texas, Arlington — Fascinating ossification research in the Bone Vascular and Micro-Circulation Laboratory — ideaXme — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biological, biotech/medical, DNA, genetics, health, life extension, science, transhumanism

Jan 29, 2020

Here’s how artificial intelligence could cure disease in the future

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, nanotechnology, robotics/AI

Circa 2016 could cure viruses in no time.


When you get right down to it, developing vaccines is about data and luck. Scientists start with a set of variables—what drugs a virus responds to, how effectively, and for whom—and then it’s a whole lot of trial and error until they stumble upon a cure.

One of the most exciting possibilities in medical research right now is how technology like machine learning could help researchers rapidly process those enormous sets of data, more quickly leading to cures. This is already starting to happen: In a study published Wednesday in the journal Macromolecules, researchers from IBM and Singapore’s Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology reveal a breakthrough that could help prevent deadly virus infections. With the help of IBM super computer Watson, they hope their finding will soon make its way into vaccines.

Continue reading “Here’s how artificial intelligence could cure disease in the future” »

Jan 27, 2020

CRISPR takes on Huntington’s disease

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical

Circa 2018


Gene editing offers the prospect of curing the inherited neurodegenerative condition in a single dose.

Jan 25, 2020

The biohacker who wants to become cyborg to be more perfect

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, computing, cyborgs, life extension, neuroscience, transhumanism

New transhumanism and biohacking story out by one of Asia’s most influential newspapers: South China Morning Post:


From brain supplements to chip implants to nootropics, humans are using technology, medicine and extreme diets to improve their brainpower, health and longevity.

Continue reading “The biohacker who wants to become cyborg to be more perfect” »

Jan 21, 2020

Why Gene Editors Like CRISPR/Cas May Be a Game-Changer for Neuroweapons

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, governance, health, neuroscience, policy, surveillance

This year marks the Eighth Review Conference (RevCon) of the Biological Toxins and Weapons Convention (BWC). At the same time, ongoing international efforts to further and more deeply investigate the brain’s complex neuronal circuitry are creating unprecedented capabilities to both understand and control neurological processes of thought, emotion, and behavior. These advances have tremendous promise for human health, but the potential for their misuse has also been noted, with most discussions centering on research and development of agents that are addressed by existing BWC and Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) proscriptions. In this article, we discuss the dual-use possibilities fostered by employing emergent biotechnologic techniques and tools—specifically, novel gene editors like clustered regular interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)—to produce neuroweapons. Based on our analyses, we posit the strong likelihood that development of genetically modified or created neurotropic substances will advance apace with other gene-based therapeutics, and we assert that this represents a novel—and realizable—path to creating potential neuroweapons. In light of this, we propose that it will be important to re-address current categorizations of weaponizable tools and substances, so as to better inform and generate tractable policy to enable improved surveillance and governance of novel neuroweapons.

Keywords: : CRISPR, Gene editing, Neuroweapon, Neurotherapeutic pathways, Dual-use neuroscience, Biosecurity policy.

T his year marks the Eighth Review Conference (RevCon) of the Biological Toxins and Weapons Convention (BWC), the purpose of which is to ensure that the convened parties’ directives continue to be relevant to and viable for prohibiting the development, production, and stockpiling of biological weapons in the face of newly emerging scientific advancements and biotechnologies. Apropos of issues raised at previous RevCons and elsewhere, there are growing concerns about current and future weaponization of neurobiological agents and tools (ie, “neuroweapons”1–6).

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