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Archive for the ‘bioengineering’ category: Page 2

Dec 20, 2022

Kent team creates material that can stop supersonic impacts

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biological, physics, space

A Kent team, led by Professors Ben Goult and Jen Hiscock, has created and patented a ground-breaking new shock-absorbing material that could revolutionise both the defence and planetary science sectors.

This novel protein-based family of materials, named TSAM (Talin Shock Absorbing Materials), represents the first known example of a SynBio (or synthetic biology) material capable of absorbing supersonic projectile impacts. This opens the door for the development of next-generation bullet-proof armour and projectile capture materials to enable the study of hypervelocity impacts in space and the upper atmosphere (astrophysics).

Professor Ben Goult explained: Our work on the protein talin, which is the cells natural shock absorber, has shown that this molecule contains a series of binary switch domains which open under tension and refold again once tension drops. This response to force gives talin its molecular shock absorbing properties, protecting our cells from the effects of large force changes. When we polymerised talin into a TSAM, we found the shock absorbing properties of talin monomers imparted the material with incredible properties.’

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Dec 19, 2022

Stresses and hydrodynamics: Scientists uncover new organizing principles of the genome

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical

A team of scientists has uncovered the physical principles—a series of forces and hydrodynamic flows—that help ensure the proper functioning of life’s blueprint. Its discovery provides new insights into the genome while potentially offering a new means to spot genomic aberrations linked to developmental disorders and human diseases.

“The way in which the is organized and packed inside the nucleus directly affects its biological function, yet the physical principles behind this organization are far from understood,” explains Alexandra Zidovska, an associate professor in New York University’s Department of Physics and an author of the paper, which appears in the journal Physical Review X (PRX). “Our results provide fundamental insights into the biophysical origins of the organization of the genome inside the .”

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Dec 18, 2022

FUTURE OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (2030 — 10,000 A.D.+)

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, bioengineering, biological, genetics, mathematics, physics, Ray Kurzweil, robotics/AI, singularity, space travel

This video explores the timelapse of artificial intelligence from 2030 to 10,000A.D.+. Watch this next video about Super Intelligent AI and why it will be unstoppable: https://youtu.be/xPvo9YYHTjE
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Dec 18, 2022

Transhumanism and Human Genetic Engineering — ROBERT SEPEHR

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, genetics, life extension, nanotechnology, robotics/AI, transhumanism

Transhumanism advocates the use of current and emerging technologies such as genetic engineering, artificial intelligence, and nanotechnology, to augment human capabilities, enhance longevity, and improve cognition. The term “designer baby” refers to a child who would develop from an embryo or sperm or egg that had been genetically altered. Is there a covert political agenda behind this allegedly altruistic scientific movement?

Robert Sepehr is an anthropologist and author.
(books also available through other book outlets)
http://amazon.com/Robert-Sepehr/e/B00XTAB1YC/

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Dec 15, 2022

Algae microrobots fight persistent bacterial infections

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, chemistry

Bioengineers used a modular, step-by-step chemical technique to create algae that carry antibiotic payloads.

Dec 15, 2022

Opinion: Bioethicists Should Not Control Your Body

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, ethics

Well… that’s me uninvited to the bioethicist’s christmas party…


Bioethicists frequently dictate what patients can and cannot do with their own bodies, and yet the general public very rarely questions this. Maybe it’s time we started to question what right bioethicists have to dictate what we can and cannot do with our own bodies?

Dec 15, 2022

Skin bioprinting: the future of burn wound reconstruction?

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioengineering, bioprinting, biotech/medical, robotics/AI

In addition to laser-assisted bioprinting, other light-based 3D bioprinting techniques include digital light processing (DLP) and two-photon polymerization (TPP)-based 3D bioprinting. DLP uses a digital micro-mirror device to project a patterned mask of ultraviolet (UV)/visible range light onto a polymer solution, which in turn results in photopolymerization of the polymer in contact [56, 57]. DLP can achieve high resolution with rapid printing speed regardless of the layer’s complexity and area. In this method of 3D bioprinting, the dynamics of the polymerization can be regulated by modulating the power of the light source, the printing rate, and the type and concentrations of the photoinitiators used. TPP, on the other hand, utilizes a focused near-infrared femtosecond laser of wavelength 800 nm to induce polymerization of the monomer solution [56]. TPP can provide a very high resolution beyond the light diffraction limit since two-photon absorption only happens in the center region of the laser focal spot where the energy is above the threshold to trigger two-photon absorption [56].

The recent development of the integrated tissue and organ printer (ITOP) by our group allows for bioprinting of human scale tissues of any shape [45]. The ITOP facilitates bioprinting with very high precision; it has a resolution of 50 μm for cells and 2 μm for scaffolding materials. This enables recapitulation of heterocellular tissue biology and allows for fabrication of functional tissues. The ITOP is configured to deliver the bioink within a stronger water-soluble gel, Pluronic F-127, that helps the printed cells to maintain their shape during the printing process. Thereafter, the Pluronic F-127 scaffolding is simply washed away from the bioprinted tissue. To ensure adequate oxygen diffusion into the bioprinted tissue, microchannels are created with the biodegradable polymer, polycaprolactone (PCL). Stable human-scale ear cartilage, bone, and skeletal muscle structures were printed with the ITOP, which when implanted in animal models, matured into functional tissue and developed a network of blood vessels and nerves [45]. In addition to the use of materials such as Pluronic F-127 and PCL for support scaffolds, other strategies for improving structural integrity of the 3D bioprinted constructs include the use of suitable thickening agents such as hydroxyapatite particles, nanocellulose, and Xanthan and gellan gum. Further, the use of hydrogel mixtures instead of a single hydrogel is a helpful strategy. For example, the use of gelatin-methacrylamide (GelMA)/hyaluronic acid (HA) mixture instead of GelMA alone shows enhanced printability since HA improves the viscosity of mixture while crosslinking of GelMA retains post-printing structural integrity [58].

To date, several studies have investigated skin bioprinting as a novel approach to reconstruct functional skin tissue [44, 59,60,61,62,63,64,65,66,67]. Some of the advantages of fabrication of skin constructs using bioprinting compared to other conventional tissue engineering strategies are the automation and standardization for clinical application and precision in deposition of cells. Although conventional tissue engineering strategies (i.e., culturing cells on a scaffold and maturation in a bioreactor) might currently achieve similar results to bioprinting, there are still many aspects that require improvements in the production process of the skin, including the long production times to obtain large surfaces required to cover the entire burn wounds [67]. There are two different approaches to skin bioprinting: in situ bioprinting and in vitro bioprinting. Both these approaches are similar except for the site of printing and tissue maturation. In situ bioprinting involves direct printing of pre-cultured cells onto the site of injury for wound closure allowing for skin maturation at the wound site. The use of in situ bioprinting for burn wound reconstruction provides several advantages, including precise deposition of cells on the wound, elimination of the need for expensive and time-consuming in vitro differentiation, and the need for multiple surgeries [68]. In the case of in vitro bioprinting, printing is done in vitro and the bioprinted skin is allowed to mature in a bioreactor, after which it is transplanted to the wound site. Our group is working on developing approaches for in situ bioprinting [69]. An inkjet-based bioprinting system was developed to print primary human keratinocytes and fibroblasts on dorsal full-thickness (3 cm × 2.5 cm) wounds in athymic nude mice. First, fibroblasts (1.0 × 105 cells/cm2) incorporated into fibrinogen/collagen hydrogels were printed on the wounds, followed by a layer of keratinocytes (1.0 × 107 cells/cm2) above the fibroblast layer [69]. Complete re-epithelialization was achieved in these relatively large wounds after 8 weeks. This bioprinting system involves the use of a novel cartridge-based delivery system for deposition of cells at the site of injury. A laser scanner scans the wound and creates a map of the missing skin, and fibroblasts and keratinocytes are printed directly on to this area. These cells then form the dermis and epidermis, respectively. This was further validated in a pig wound model, wherein larger wounds (10 cm × 10 cm) were treated by printing a layer of fibroblasts followed by keratinocytes (10 million cells each) [69]. Wound healing and complete re-epithelialization were observed by 8 weeks. This pivotal work shows the potential of using in situ bioprinting approaches for wound healing and skin regeneration. Clinical studies are currently in progress with this in situ bioprinting system. In another study, amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) were bioprinted directly onto full-thickness dorsal skin wounds (2 cm × 2 cm) of nu/nu mice using a pressure-driven, computer-controlled bioprinting device [44]. AFSCs and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were suspended in fibrin-collagen gel, mixed with thrombin solution (a crosslinking agent), and then printed onto the wound site. Two layers of fibrin-collagen gel and thrombin were printed on the wounds. Bioprinting enabled effective wound closure and re-epithelialization likely through a growth factor-mediated mechanism by the stem cells. These studies indicate the potential of using in situ bioprinting for treatment of large wounds and burns.

Dec 15, 2022

Cornellian-founded company implants 3D-bioprinted ear

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, education

In a first-of-its-kind clinical trial, a human has received a 3D-bioprinted ear implant grown from the patient’s own living cells – thanks to a technology platform developed by a Cornellian-founded startup company.

This bioengineered breakthrough has the potential to significantly improve the lives of the approximately 1,500 children who are born annually in the U.S. with microtia, a congenital ear deformity. The approach could eventually lead to tissue implants for treating other conditions and traumatic injuries, reconstructive and regenerative therapy, and possibly even the biomanufacture of whole organs.

The company, 3DBio Therapeutics, was founded in 2014 by Dan Cohen ‘04, M.S. ‘07, Ph.D. ‘10, along with Lawrence Bonassar, the Daljit S. and Elaine Sarkaria Professor in Biomedical Engineering and in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering in the College of Engineering, and Hod Lipson, who taught at Cornell for 14 years and is now a professor at Columbia University.

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Dec 14, 2022

Elon’s AGILE Takeover (of Twitter) | Experts don’t get Elon bc Experts don’t get AGILE!

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, business, Elon Musk, sustainability, transportation

MSM and Experts fail to see the logic in how Elon Musk is taking over Twitter. They think it’s chaos, a mess, he’s out of his depth. But Elon is just working AGILE, and AGILE always seems like a mess to onlookers used to traditional work!
The video describes Elon’s Agile Takeover of Twitter and shows the opportunity worth BILLION$ that Elon Musk has ALREADY unlocked.

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Dec 13, 2022

4 Mind-Boggling Technology Advances In Store For 2023

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, bioengineering, biological, internet, robotics/AI, space

Kindly see my latest FORBES article:

In the piece I explore some of the emerging tech that will impact our coming year. Thank you for reading and sharing!


2022 was a transformative year for technological innovation and digital transformation. The trend will continue as the pace of innovation and development of potentially disruptive emerging technologies exponentially increases every year. The question arises, what lies ahead for tech for us to learn and experience in 2023?

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