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Jul 20, 2020

Elon Musk claims his Neuralink chip will allow you to stream music directly to your brain

Posted by in categories: computing, Elon Musk, media & arts, neuroscience

Amazing.


Brain-computer interface could also give people ‘enhanced abilities’.

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Jul 18, 2020

20 Grand Tsakli of Tibet and relaunch of tsakli

Posted by in categories: education, life extension, media & arts

Posthuman Buddhism isn’t restricted to human-era schools or traditions, These (previously unpublished) tsakli are from all Vajrapani schools. Unlike Eastern cultures, in the West we do not require a “Guru” and tsakli can be used for “self-initiation”. Unlike religions that make truth claims for supernatural beings or impossible events, Buddhism sees any deities (peaceful or wrathful) as self-originating. The future surely lies with psychomorphological approaches that are amenable to — and not contradictory — to science.


This new book, 4 in the series, contains fourteen rare and unusual C17th or C18th “Grande Tsaklis”, another four late C18th examples reportedly originating from Tsurphu monastry, plus two extremely large tsakli (giants in tsakli terms) one depicting a wind horse whilst the other shows a figure in historically early clothes with butterlamp, male and female deer and an elephant, C16th to C18th. All fronts and reverse (texts) of tsakli are shown.

These 13 plus (1 from different series of the grandes tsakli) detail rituals to be performed at certain times of the year that promote longevity and ward off evil influences. Astrological and various motifs and ritual implements are shown in the compartments, and crucial text is in the triangles. Some have damage (below missing top part of red border). All 20 are rare.

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Jul 9, 2020

New study detects ringing of the global atmosphere

Posted by in categories: media & arts, physics

A ringing bell vibrates simultaneously at a low-pitched fundamental tone and at many higher-pitched overtones, producing a pleasant musical sound. A recent study, just published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences by scientists at Kyoto University and the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, shows that the Earth’s entire atmosphere vibrates in an analogous manner, in a striking confirmation of theories developed by physicists over the last two centuries.

In the case of the , the “music” comes not as a sound we could hear, but in the form of large-scale waves of spanning the globe and traveling around the equator, some moving east-to-west and others west-to-east. Each of these waves is a resonant vibration of the global atmosphere, analogous to one of the resonant pitches of a bell. The basic understanding of these atmospheric resonances began with seminal insights at the beginning of the 19th century by one of history’s greatest scientists, the French physicist and mathematician Pierre-Simon Laplace. Research by physicists over the subsequent two centuries refined the theory and led to detailed predictions of the wave frequencies that should be present in the atmosphere. However, the actual detection of such waves in the has lagged behind the theory.

Now in a new study by Takatoshi Sakazaki, an assistant professor at the Kyoto University Graduate School of Science, and Kevin Hamilton, an Emeritus Professor in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences and the International Pacific Research Center at the University of Hawai?i at Mānoa, the authors present a detailed analysis of observed atmospheric pressure over the globe every hour for 38 years. The results clearly revealed the presence of dozens of the predicted wave modes.

Jul 5, 2020

Tesla’s $20,000 Compact Car — Coming Soon After Tesla Battery Day Reveals New Batteries

Posted by in categories: Elon Musk, media & arts, sustainability, transportation

Tesla is working on a compact car that will be manufactured in China and distributed worldwide. The battery technologies required for a compact car will be unveiled at Tesla Battery Day that will enable Tesla to make a small car for less than $25,000, possibly close to $20,000 or less. The battery cost is the main factor to drive down the cost of an electric vehicle. The compact car is coming soon after Tesla Battery Day technologies are revealed. The new batteries will allow Tesla to shrink the battery pack’s size while offering enough range for everyday driving. Elon Musk’s speech at the launch event in China suggests the car will be quite unique, just like the Cybertruck.

WATCH NEXT: https://youtu.be/3ni0T6yxJ_U

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Jul 1, 2020

Epic Cycling | Truly Unique Bicycle that Walks

Posted by in categories: media & arts, robotics/AI, transportation

In today’s video I want to show you symbiosis of bicycle and walking robotic creature Strandbeest!

If you like this video don’t forget to sucscribe smile

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Jun 30, 2020

Researchers use quantum teleportation to jam with a quantum AI

Posted by in categories: media & arts, quantum physics, robotics/AI

Dr Alexis Kirke of the University of Plymouth has demonstrated the use of teleportation in music jamming.

Jun 28, 2020

Chris Webby — Our Planet (feat. Bria Lee) [Official Video]

Posted by in category: media & arts

This is a really cool message. Please spread it around.


Welcome to #WebbyWednesday!

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Jun 26, 2020

A Decade of Sun

Posted by in categories: media & arts, space

Click on photo to start video.

In its 10 years observing the Sun, our Solar Dynamics Observatory satellite has gathered over 425 million high-resolution images of our star.

Continue reading “A Decade of Sun” »

Jun 17, 2020

Light bulb vibrations yield eavesdropping data

Posted by in categories: habitats, media & arts

In an era of digital eavesdropping where hackers employ a variety of means to take over built-in video cameras, peruse personal digital data and snoop on cellular conversations, researchers have finally seen the light.

Literally.

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Jun 15, 2020

Cutting-edge research shows that making art benefits the brain

Posted by in categories: biological, health, media & arts, neuroscience

In other words, practicing the arts can be used to build capacity for managing one’s mental and emotional well-being.

Neuroesthetics — With recent advances in biological, cognitive, and neurological science, there are new forms of evidence on the arts and the brain. For example, researchers have used biofeedback to study the effects of visual art on neural circuits and neuroendocrine markers to find biological evidence that visual art promotes health, wellness, and fosters adaptive responses to stress.

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