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Archive for the ‘health’ category: Page 2

Jun 20, 2019

Inside Life on the Frontlines of the Ebola Crisis in Congo

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, economics, habitats, health

On the frontlines of the Ebola response are local Congolese workers with temporary job contracts. They are often driven into this work by economic necessity, as well as a desire to help.

Belinda Landu, a tall 28-year-old with long hair who radiates confidence, was making a meager living as a tailor in capital city Kinshasa before the outbreak. While visiting her mother in Beni last August, she spotted an advertisement for a health promoter. Today, she’s passionate about her role: decontaminating the houses of confirmed Ebola patients. “I want to stop the spread of the epidemic,” she said. “My family understand I work here to help people. If we get Ebola people will help us too.”

When she arrives at the scene of a recent diagnosis, Landu changes into a full protective outfit, including a full plastic bodysuit, mask, hairnet, gumboots, and both latex and rubber gloves, and begins the slow process of covering everything — inside and outside a house — with a chlorinated spray. Locals gather around to stare at her. They’re often terrified, she says, though she tries to be kind — speaking to them before she starts, and even stopping to play soccer with children after she changes out of her outfit.

Jun 19, 2019

Survival to Age 90 in Men: The Tromsø Study 1974–2018

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health

https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16112028 The aim of this study was to identify risk factors, individually and in combination, and their impact on reaching up to 90 years of age. The 738 oldest men who participated in the first survey of the population-based Tromsø Study (Tromsø 1) in Norway in 1974 have now had the chance to reach the age of 90 years. The men were also invited to subsequent surveys (Tromsø 2–7, 1979–2016) and have been followed up for all-cause deaths. This study sought to investigate what could be learned from how these men have fared. The men were born in 1925–1928 and similar health-related data from questionnaires, physical examination, and blood samples are available for all surveys. Survival curves over various variable strata were applied to evaluate the impact of individual risk factors and combinations of risk factors on all-cause deaths. At the end of 2018, 118 (16.0%) of the men had reached 90 years of age. Smoking in 1974 was the strongest single risk factor associated with survival, with observed percentages of men reaching 90 years being 26.3, 25.7, and 10.8 for never, former, and current smokers, respectively. Significant effects on survival were also found for physical inactivity, low income, being unmarried, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. For men with 0–4 of these risk factors, the percentages reaching 90 years were 33.3, 24.9, 12.4, 14.4, and 1.5, respectively. Quitting smoking and increasing physical activity before 55 years of age improved survival significantly. Men should refrain from smoking and increase their physical activity, especially those with low income, those who are unmarried, and those with high blood pressure and high cholesterol. A limitation is that data on women not were collected; Quitting smoking and increasing physical activity before 55 years of age improved survival significantly.

Jun 19, 2019

Dr. Dennis McKenna — ideaXme — Psychedelic Drugs in Mainstream Medicine — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biotech/medical, business, chemistry, finance, health, life extension, neuroscience

Jun 19, 2019

New study finds 45,000 deaths annually linked to lack of health coverage

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health

Nearly 45,000 annual deaths are associated with lack of health insurance, according to a new study published online today by the American Journal of Public Health. That figure is about two and a half times higher than an estimate from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 2002.

The study, conducted at Harvard Medical School and Cambridge Health Alliance, found that uninsured, working-age Americans have a 40 percent higher risk of death than their privately insured counterparts, up from a 25 percent excess death rate found in 1993.

“The uninsured have a higher risk of death when compared to the privately insured, even after taking into account socioeconomics, health behaviors, and baseline health,” said lead author Andrew Wilper, M.D., who currently teaches at the University of Washington School of Medicine. “We doctors have many new ways to prevent deaths from hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease — but only if patients can get into our offices and afford their medications.”

Jun 18, 2019

Google backs a bid to use CRISPR to prevent heart disease

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, computing, food, genetics, health

Ever wonder why some fortunate people eat chips, don’t exercise, and still don’t get clogged arteries? It could be because they’ve got lucky genes.

Now Alphabet (Google’s parent company) is bankrolling a startup company that plans to use gene editing to spread fortunate DNA variations with “one-time” injections of the gene-editing tool CRISPR.

Heart doctors involved say the DNA-tweaking injections could “confer lifelong protection” against heart disease.

Jun 18, 2019

One of Earth’s First Cities Suffered the Same Issues Metropolises Face Today

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food, health

“I am committed to the notion that the past predicts the present,” Larsen tells Inverse, “and we need to understand that past to understand the world we live in now.”

Larsen has had a longstanding interest in the health and lifestyle of early farmers — those who were working around the Neolithic transition from hunting and gathering to farming. So when Ian Hodder, Ph.D., an archeologist who leads the Çatalhöyük Research Project, invited him to join the project in 2004, he quickly accepted the opportunity.

This new study is based on 25 years of findings linked to the human remains found in Çatalhöyük. Dating of remains shows that the population there grew to its peak in the period from 6,700 to 6,500 B.C. and then declined rapidly. That decline is likely linked to the evidence of disease and malnutrition Larsen and colleagues found in the remains.

Jun 18, 2019

Can probiotics and other factors be used reliably to benefit health?

Posted by in categories: food, genetics, health

Steven Finkel tells the story of a close family member who had a discomforting health issue—the kind you don’t discuss at the dinner table.

“She went and chose a bunch of yogurts with active culture,” he says. The first yogurt—call it Yogurt A—made her constipated, and Yogurt B gave her diarrhea. “It’s like Goldilocks,” he adds, before concluding her tale of woe with a happy ending: “Yogurt C made her feel great.”

Hoping to understand how three versions of one food could cause such dissimilar reactions, the relative contacted Finkel, who is professor of biological sciences at USC Dornsife and an expert on bacterial physiology, genetics and evolution.

Jun 16, 2019

Phosphorous and calcium in lobster will strengthen your bones

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food, health, neuroscience

There are many nutritional and delicious benefits of eating lobster. Some of them include protecting heart health, increasing energy, decreasing inflammation, speeding healing, promoting growth, boosting brain functioning and building strong bones. Lobsters are shelled marine creatures which are taking parts of crustaceans. They have the scientific name Homarus nephrops. This scientific name is the North Atlantic variety. This undersea creature is having old look and it is considered to be luxury or delicacy food in many parts of the world. Nowadays lobster is exported to many parts of the world. They are particularly popular in North America. Lobsters are delicious food but they have high prices which is a reason why they are not consumed a lot. It is important to know that the lobster has high amounts of cholesterol and sodium. If you suffer from cardiovascular issues, high blood pressure or any other health condition, then you should not consume lobster because it has minerals and nutrients which are not ideal for these conditions. Every food should be consumed in moderation. Lobster is ideal food for people to get many vitamins and minerals that are essential for their health. People who live in North American coasts can have lobster in every time because here the price of it is very low.

Jun 13, 2019

Amazon conference showcases robots and social uses of artificial intelligence

Posted by in categories: business, drones, employment, health, robotics/AI, space travel

Thousands of tech fans descended on the Mojave desert for the conference, a public offshoot of Amazon Chairman Jeff Bezos’ previous invitation-only MARS conferences (the acronym stands for “Machine Learning, Robotics, Automation and Space”).

It resembled a tech summer camp, replete with offerings of cutting-edge technology demos, talks and social events.

Continue reading “Amazon conference showcases robots and social uses of artificial intelligence” »

Jun 12, 2019

AI, Immunology, and Healthcare — Professor Shai Shen-Orr PhD., Associate Professor at Technion — Israel Institute of Technology, and Founder and Chief Scientist CytoReason — ideaXme — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, big data, bioengineering, biotech/medical, business, disruptive technology, DNA, genetics, health, life extension
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