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Jul 12, 2022

Cells To Silicon: Your Brain In 2050

Posted by in categories: computing, neuroscience

At present, our brains are mostly dependent on all the stuff below the neck to turn thought into action. But advances in neuroscience are making it easier than ever to hook machines up to minds. See neuroscientists John Donoghue and Sheila Nirenberg, computer scientist Michel Maharbiz, and psychologist Gary Marcus discuss the cutting edge of brain-machine interactions in “Cells to Silicon: Your Brain in 2050,” part of the Big Ideas series at the 2014 World Science Festival.

This program is part of the Big Ideas Series, made possible with support from the John Templeton Foundation.

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Jul 12, 2022

The Most Powerful Computers You’ve Never Heard Of…

Posted by in category: computing

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Jul 12, 2022

Humanity getting lost in the MATRIOSHKA Brain🤖

Posted by in categories: computing, finance, space travel

A Matrioshka Brain is a supermassive structure in space consisting of processors and connected to each other into a massive computer around a sun harnessing its energy completely. So far we haven’t built one as we don’t have the technology for it but when we do the question will be if people will be lost in the vast computing power of the Matrishka brain.

Watch all 3 videos with Brendan Caulfield:
3. Future of Humanity https://youtu.be/XbhWEDhcdFk.
2. The Rockets of SpaceX 🚀https://youtu.be/VPgVS9qgBEM
1. The CAR company that will take us to SPACE🚀 https://youtu.be/Y0jiGkAH-pE

Continue reading “Humanity getting lost in the MATRIOSHKA Brain🤖” »

Jul 11, 2022

Google is Testing a Feature That Reduces CPU Use to Extend Battery Life

Posted by in category: computing

Google is working on a new feature that will help extend battery life, Quick Intensive Throttling.

Google is testing the new feature called “Quick Intensive Throttling,” which cuts the amount of time spent by the CPU by 10%.

Continue reading “Google is Testing a Feature That Reduces CPU Use to Extend Battery Life” »

Jul 11, 2022

Single molecules can work as reproducible transistors—at room temperature

Posted by in categories: computing, engineering, particle physics

A major goal in the field of molecular electronics, which aims to use single molecules as electronic components, is to make a device where a quantized, controllable flow of charge can be achieved at room temperature. A first step in this field is for researchers to demonstrate that single molecules can function as reproducible circuit elements such as transistors or diodes that can easily operate at room temperature.

A team led by Latha Venkataraman, professor of applied physics and chemistry at Columbia Engineering and Xavier Roy, assistant professor of chemistry (Arts & Sciences), published a study in Nature Nanotechnology that is the first to reproducibly demonstrate current blockade—the ability to switch a device from the insulating to the conducting state where charge is added and removed one electron at a time—using atomically precise molecular clusters at .

Bonnie Choi, a graduate student in the Roy group and co-lead author of the work, created a single cluster of geometrically ordered atoms with an inorganic core made of just 14 atoms—resulting in a diameter of about 0.5 nanometers—and positioned linkers that wired the core to two gold electrodes, much as a resistor is soldered to two metal electrodes to form a macroscopic electrical circuit (e.g. the filament in a light bulb).

Jul 11, 2022

Researchers first to create a single-molecule diode

Posted by in categories: computing, engineering, nanotechnology, quantum physics

Under the direction of Latha Venkataraman, associate professor of applied physics at Columbia Engineering, researchers have designed a new technique to create a single-molecule diode, and, in doing so, they have developed molecular diodes that perform 50 times better than all prior designs. Venkataraman’s group is the first to develop a single-molecule diode that may have real-world technological applications for nanoscale devices. Their paper, “Single-Molecule Diodes with High On-Off Ratios through Environmental Control,” is published May 25 in Nature Nanotechnology.

“Our new approach created a single-molecule diode that has a high (250) rectification and a high “on” current (~ 0.1 micro Amps),” says Venkataraman. “Constructing a device where the active elements are only a single molecule has long been a tantalizing dream in nanoscience. This goal, which has been the ‘holy grail’ of molecular electronics ever since its inception with Aviram and Ratner’s 1974 seminal paper, represents the ultimate in functional miniaturization that can be achieved for an electronic device.”

With electronic devices becoming smaller every day, the field of has become ever more critical in solving the problem of further miniaturization, and single molecules represent the limit of miniaturization. The idea of creating a single-molecule diode was suggested by Arieh Aviram and Mark Ratner who theorized in 1974 that a molecule could act as a rectifier, a one-way conductor of electric current. Researchers have since been exploring the charge-transport properties of molecules. They have shown that single-molecules attached to metal electrodes (single-molecule junctions) can be made to act as a variety of circuit elements, including resistors, switches, transistors, and, indeed, diodes. They have learned that it is possible to see quantum mechanical effects, such as interference, manifest in the conductance properties of molecular junctions.

Jul 11, 2022

Quantum Computing for Dummies

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Quantum computers may one day rapidly find solutions to problems no regular computer might ever hope to solve, but there are vanishingly few quantum programmers when compared with the number of conventional programmers in the world. A new beginner’s guide aims to walk would-be quantum programmers.

Jul 10, 2022

D-Wave’s 500-Qubit Machine Hits the Cloud

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

The standard approach toward building quantum computers, called the gate model, involves arranging qubits in circuits and making them interact with each other in a fixed sequence. In contrast, Burnaby, Canada-based D-Wave has long focused on what are called annealing quantum computers.

Jul 10, 2022

Humanity getting lost in the MATRIOSHKA Brain🤖

Posted by in categories: computing, finance, space travel

A Matrioshka Brain is a supermassive structure in space consisting of processors and connected to each other into a massive computer around a sun harnessing its energy completely. So far we haven’t built one as we don’t have the technology for it but when we do the question will be if people will be lost in the vast computing power of the Matrishka brain.

Watch all 3 videos with Brendan Caulfield:
3. Future of Humanity https://youtu.be/XbhWEDhcdFk.
2. The Rockets of SpaceX 🚀https://youtu.be/VPgVS9qgBEM
1. The CAR company that will take us to SPACE🚀 https://youtu.be/Y0jiGkAH-pE

Continue reading “Humanity getting lost in the MATRIOSHKA Brain🤖” »

Jul 10, 2022

Australian scientists put the quantum world on a microchip

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

A first-of-its-kind quantum simulator could lead to the creation of never-before-seen materials powered by quantum phenomena.

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