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Archive for the ‘neuroscience’ category: Page 9

Aug 16, 2021

A New Way to Study Neurodegenerative Diseases

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

The material properties of these protein droplets are important because they play pivotal roles in neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. The basic idea is that liquid droplets of certain proteins can change to clogs, or aggregates of molecules, which are hallmarks of these diseases.


Summary: Researchers have developed a new technique to quantify protein droplets associated with a range of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and ALS.

Source: Rutgers University

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Aug 16, 2021

‘A new low’: TRICARE cuts services for children with autism, concerning military families

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health, military, neuroscience

In March, the Defense Health Agency, which oversees TRICARE, announced that by May, advanced behavioral analysis services outside of clinical settings will no longer be covered by the military insurance.


Registered behavior technicians help implement treatment and behavior plans that teach behaviors and skills universally used.

From April: Autism services for military families could be cut under DoD plan

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Aug 16, 2021

An extra finger rewires the brain to make you feel like it’s part of your body

Posted by in categories: biological, neuroscience

Credit: Dani Clode. #Neuroscience #Research #Biology #Technology

Aug 16, 2021

Chronic pain might affect how your brain processes emotions

Posted by in category: neuroscience

Aug 15, 2021

Brain Cholesterol Regulates Alzheimer’s Plaques

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

“We showed that cholesterol is acting essentially as a signal in neurons that determines how much Aβ gets made—and thus it should be unsurprising that apoE, which carries the cholesterol to neurons, influences Alzheimer’s risk,” says study co-senior author Scott Hansen, PhD, an associate professor in the Department of Molecular Medicine at Scripps Research, Florida.


Summary: A new advanced imaging technique shows how cholesterol regulates the production of Alzheimer’s associated amyloid beta proteins in astrocytes.

Source: Scripps Research Institute

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Aug 15, 2021

Virtual reality boosts brain rhythms crucial for neuroplasticity, learning and memory

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, engineering, neuroscience, virtual reality

This is interesting. 😃


A new discovery in rats shows that the brain responds differently in immersive virtual reality environments versus the real world. The finding could help scientists understand how the brain brings together sensory information from different sources to create a cohesive picture of the world around us. It could also pave the way for “virtual reality therapy” for learning and memory-related disorders ranging including ADHD, Autism, Alzheimer’s disease, epilepsy and depression.

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Aug 14, 2021

Brain-Computer Interfaces Aim to Bring New Therapeutical Advances to Treating Neural Conditions, Paralysis, Speech Problems

Posted by in categories: computing, neuroscience

The research aims to bring the brains to a computer interface to solve its problems.

Aug 14, 2021

Brain-computer interfaces are making big progress this year

Posted by in categories: computing, neuroscience

Eight months in, 2,021 has already become a record year in brain-computer interface (BCI) funding, tripling the $97 million raised in 2019.

Aug 14, 2021

How a Specific Synapse Type Regulates Anxiety-Like Behavior

Posted by in categories: genetics, neuroscience

“Our research may help us understand how abnormalities in anxiety-like behavior occur and design circuit-based therapeutic approaches for correcting them,” remarks Professor Ji Won Um from the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at DGIST, who led the study.


Summary: Study identifies the role a specific protein plays in regulating the development of inhibitory synapses in the hippocampus in the context of anxiety-related behaviors.

Source: DGIST

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Aug 13, 2021

Modeling of emergent memory and voltage spiking in ionic transport through angstrom-scale slits

Posted by in category: neuroscience

Most memory resistor (“memristor”) systems use electrons as the charge carrier, but it may also be possible to use ionic carriers, similar to the way that neurons work. Robin et al. studied an aqueous electrolyte confined into a pseudo two-dimensional gap between two graphite layers (see the Perspective by Hou and Hou). The authors observed a current–voltage relation that exhibits hysteresis, and the conductance depends on the history of the system, also known as the memresistor effect. Using simulations of their system, they can model the emission of voltage spikes characteristic of neuromorphic activity.

Science, abf7923, this issue p. 687; see also abj0437, p. 628

Recent advances in nanofluidics have enabled the confinement of water down to a single molecular layer. Such monolayer electrolytes show promise in achieving bioinspired functionalities through molecular control of ion transport. However, the understanding of ion dynamics in these systems is still scarce. Here, we develop an analytical theory, backed up by molecular dynamics simulations, that predicts strongly nonlinear effects in ion transport across quasi–two-dimensional slits. We show that under an electric field, ions assemble into elongated clusters, whose slow dynamics result in hysteretic conduction. This phenomenon, known as the memristor effect, can be harnessed to build an elementary neuron. As a proof of concept, we carry out molecular simulations of two nanofluidic slits that reproduce the Hodgkin-Huxley model and observe spontaneous emission of voltage spikes characteristic of neuromorphic activity.

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