Menu

Blog

Archive for the ‘chemistry’ category: Page 9

Apr 23, 2022

Morgan Levine is interviewed by Rhonda Patrick on Longevity. My picks on it

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, life extension

This is a 10-minute version with my picks on an hour-and-a-half interview on the longevity science made by Rhonda Patrick to Morgan Levine.

The link to the entire interview, which took place on April 12, 2022, is in the description of the video.

Continue reading “Morgan Levine is interviewed by Rhonda Patrick on Longevity. My picks on it” »

Apr 23, 2022

Future Of Aging & Cellular Reprogramming | Eleanor Sheekey Ep 4

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, life extension, media & arts

She gives a great analogy of slowing aging versus reversing aging, and I did not realize Yamanaka Factors were not so perfect in current use.


In this video Eleanor talks about the her view on Longevity Escape Velocity and reprogramming with Yamanaka factors and some of the issues around this technology.

Continue reading “Future Of Aging & Cellular Reprogramming | Eleanor Sheekey Ep 4” »

Apr 22, 2022

Titan’s largest crater might be the perfect cradle for life

Posted by in categories: chemistry, quantum physics, space

Impacts on Saturn’s mysterious moon may have mixed water and organic molecules in a warm environment.


Physicists at the University of California, Irvine have demonstrated the use of a hydrogen molecule as a quantum sensor in a terahertz laser-equipped scanning tunneling microscope, a technique that can measure the chemical properties of materials at unprecedented time and spatial resolutions.

Apr 22, 2022

Scientists turn a hydrogen molecule into a quantum sensor

Posted by in categories: chemistry, computing, particle physics, quantum physics

Physicists at the University of California, Irvine have demonstrated the use of a hydrogen molecule as a quantum sensor in a terahertz laser-equipped scanning tunneling microscope, a technique that can measure the chemical properties of materials at unprecedented time and spatial resolutions.

This new technique can also be applied to analysis of two-dimensional materials which have the potential to play a role in advanced energy systems, electronics and quantum computers.

Today in Science, the researchers in UCI’s Department of Physics & Astronomy and Department of Chemistry describe how they positioned two bound atoms of hydrogen in between the silver tip of the STM and a sample composed of a flat copper surface arrayed with small islands of copper nitride. With pulses of the laser lasting trillionths of a second, the scientists were able to excite the hydrogen molecule and detect changes in its quantum states at and in the ultrahigh vacuum environment of the instrument, rendering atomic-scale, time-lapsed images of the sample.

Apr 22, 2022

Synthetic DNA Manufacturer has the “Write Stuff”

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, economics, genetics

Circa 2021 Synthetic silicon dna storage.


In research, the demand for DNA strands often outpaces supply. To help supply keep up, researchers may set aside traditional molecular cloning techniques and embrace polymerase chain reaction select PCR)-based techniques. Alternatively, researchers may perform gene synthesis, or the de novo chemical synthesis of DNA. Besides accelerating the creation of genetic sequences, gene synthesis avoids the need for template strands and simplifies procedures such as codon optimization and the fabrication of mutant sequences.

Although gene synthesis can be performed in house, many laboratories prefer to focus on their core competencies and outsource their gene synthesis projects to service providers, especially if sequences of over 1,000 base pairs are desired. Outsourcing also allows laboratories to take advantage of service providers’ economies of scale and quick turnaround times. Finally, service providers offer ease of use. Clients can go online, upload the desired sequences, choose the vector, get the price, and place the order. The entire process takes only a few minutes, and the genes can be delivered a few days later.

Continue reading “Synthetic DNA Manufacturer has the ‘Write Stuff’” »

Apr 21, 2022

A biological motor that consumes chiral fuel drives rotation in one direction around a single covalent bond

Posted by in categories: biological, chemistry, internet, nanotechnology, particle physics

Bart Blommaertsif it helps. But don’t cut internet cables with that thing!!

Andreas StürmerFinally. Is it going to be a rail or car tunnel?

Eric KlienAdmin.

Continue reading “A biological motor that consumes chiral fuel drives rotation in one direction around a single covalent bond” »

Apr 21, 2022

Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Spectroscopy Confirms Reversible Water Activation in Mn+(H2O)n, n ≤ 8

Posted by in categories: chemistry, particle physics, quantum physics

Ron FriedmanThink outside the box. Most people don’t need a car for the sake of having a car.

Most people need a comfortable, quick and cheap way of going from A to B. So, Robotaxi could be the ideal solution for most people most of the time.… See more.

Jerry AndersonProbably not, because new batteries that contain other elements, I think they are saying Sulfur-Lithium batteries are more efficient last longer, and don’t require recharging as often… There are bound to be other breakthroughs.

4 Replies.

Continue reading “Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Spectroscopy Confirms Reversible Water Activation in Mn+(H2O)n, n ≤ 8” »

Apr 21, 2022

Revolutionary images of the birth of crystals

Posted by in categories: chemistry, food, physics

Josh SeehermanI don’t think he’s wrong.

Art ToegemannIt’s adjusting to users sharing a password.

Shubham Ghosh Roy shared a link.

Continue reading “Revolutionary images of the birth of crystals” »

Apr 21, 2022

Reversible fuel cells can support grid economically, study finds

Posted by in categories: chemistry, climatology, solar power, sustainability

A major challenge for producers of electricity from solar panels and wind turbines is akin to capturing lightning in a bottle. Both solar and wind increasingly generate electricity amid little demand, when market prices are too low to cover costs. At noon on sunny days, for example, wholesale power prices in areas with high quantities of solar and wind occasionally fall below zero.

Some renewable energy producers store their excess as green , using the electricity to produce hydrogen from water—labeled “green” because the process emits no . Used to create fuels, fertilizer, and other chemicals, the global hydrogen market is about $125 billion, and it’s growing briskly in part due to increased interest in hydrogen as a fuel for buses, trucks, and even ships. The problem is that producing hydrogen with electricity remains fairly expensive, so it’s only profitable to sell at the higher prices paid by lower-volume customers.

But now, researchers at Stanford University and at the University of Mannheim in Germany have found a possible solution: integrated reversible power-to-gas systems that can easily convert hydrogen back to electricity when power prices spike higher.

Apr 19, 2022

Capturing Solar Energy and Converting It to Electricity When Needed — Up to 18 Years Later

Posted by in categories: chemistry, engineering, solar power, sustainability

The researchers behind an energy system that makes it possible to capture solar energy, store it for up to eighteen years, and release it when and where it is needed have now taken the system a step further. After previously demonstrating how the energy can be extracted as heat, they have now succeeded in getting the system to produce electricity, by connecting it to a thermoelectric generator. Eventually, the research – developed at Chalmers University of Technology 0, Sweden – could lead to self-charging electronic gadgets that use stored solar energy on demand.

“This is a radically new way of generating electricity from solar energy. It means that we can use solar energy to produce electricity regardless of weather, time of day, season, or geographical location. It is a closed system that can operate without causing carbon dioxide emissions,” says research leader Kasper Moth-Poulsen, Professor at the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at Chalmers.

Continue reading “Capturing Solar Energy and Converting It to Electricity When Needed — Up to 18 Years Later” »

Page 9 of 147First678910111213Last