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Archive for the ‘3D printing’ category: Page 15

Nov 29, 2019

3D Bio-Printers for Human Organs and Tissues

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioprinting, biotech/medical

In the future, you could 3D print organ replacements and biological tissues anywhere you want!

Nov 26, 2019

Michelin unveils airless 3D-printed tires that last virtually forever

Posted by in category: 3D printing

The Michelin Vision tire concept does not need to be inflated, is specifically manufactured through 3D printing, and is biodegradable.

Nov 25, 2019

Giant 3D printers for making boats, bridges, buildings and rockets

Posted by in category: 3D printing

Printing bigger and faster

Science and technology Nov 14th 2019 edition.

Nov 20, 2019

You Can Make a Rocket Engine’s Entire Combustion Chamber in One 3D Print

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, space travel

Launcher says one-piece manufacture lowers the cost of its part, compared with those printed in pieces and joined. To do this, the Brooklyn-based startup teamed with 3D printer companies to build a space large enough for its entire copper-alloy part, which itself is a huge investment.

Nov 20, 2019

Within 10 Years, We’ll Travel by Hyperloop, Rockets, and Avatars

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, robotics/AI, transportation

“The Hyperloop exists,” says Josh Giegel, co-founder and chief technology officer of Hyperloop One, “because of the rapid acceleration of power electronics, computational modeling, material sciences, and 3D printing.”

Thanks to these convergences, there are now ten major Hyperloop One projects—in various stages of development—spread across the globe. Chicago to DC in 35 minutes. Pune to Mumbai in 25 minutes. According to Giegel, “Hyperloop is targeting certification in 2023. By 2025, the company plans to have multiple projects under construction and running initial passenger testing.”

So think about this timetable: Autonomous car rollouts by 2020. Hyperloop certification and aerial ridesharing by 2023. By 2025—going on vacation might have a totally different meaning. Going to work most definitely will.

Continue reading “Within 10 Years, We’ll Travel by Hyperloop, Rockets, and Avatars” »

Nov 18, 2019

Scientists 3D Print Skin That Develops Working Blood Vessels

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical

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Nov 17, 2019

Mesmerizing 3D printing technique

Posted by in category: 3D printing

A new 3D printing technique switches between ‘inks’ so fast you can’t even see it.

Nov 14, 2019

Realistic arm prosthetic

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical, cyborgs, robotics/AI

This 3D-printed robotic arm could be the most advanced and most realistic yet.

Nov 14, 2019

The world’s first medically approved 3D-printed bionic arm is now available in the UK, USA, France, Spain and Ireland for children and adults with below-elbow limb differences

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical, cyborgs, transhumanism

More countries coming very soon! Start your bionic journey here: http://

Nov 14, 2019

Engineering biomimetic microvascular meshes for subcutaneous islet transplantation

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioengineering, biotech/medical

To successfully engineer cell or tissue implants, bioengineers must facilitate their metabolic requirements through vascular regeneration. However, it is challenging to develop a broad strategy for stable and functional vascularization. In a recent report on Nature Communications, Wei Song and colleagues in the interdisciplinary departments of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Medicine, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Clinical Sciences and Bioengineering in the U.S. described highly organized, biomimetic and resilient microvascular meshes. The team engineered them using controllable, anchored self-assembly methods to form microvascular meshes that are almost defect-free and transferrable to diverse substrates, for transplantation.

The scientists promoted the formation of functional blood vessels with a density as high as ~200 vessels per mm-2 within the subcutaneous space of SCID-Beige mice. They demonstrated the possibility of engineering microvascular meshes using human induced pluripotent stem-cell (iPSCs) derived (ECs). The technique opens a way to engineer patient-specific type 1 diabetes treatment by combining microvascular meshes for subcutaneous transplantation of rat islets in SCID-beige mice to achieve correction of chemically induced diabetes for 3 months.

Vasculature is an essential component of any organ or tissue, and vascular regeneration is critical to successfully bioengineer implants. For instance, during cell replacement therapy for type 1 diabetes (T1D), transplanted insulin producing cells rely on the vasculature to function and survive. Bioengineers often use vascular endothelial cells such as human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to spontaneously assemble into tubular structures within the extracellular matrix (ECM). But the resulting structures can be random, uncontrollable and less efficient for microvascular regeneration. Scientists have recently developed three-dimensional (3D) printing techniques to engineer controlled cellular constructs with embedded vessels. However, it remains challenging to 3D print resilient and transferrable, high-resolution, microvasculature.

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