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Dec 6, 2021

A Vortex in a Nanometric Teacup: Researchers Generate a Vortex Beam of Atoms and Molecules

Posted by in categories: employment, particle physics, robotics/AI, space travel

Robots are already in space. From landers on the moon to rovers on Mars and more, robots are the perfect candidates for space exploration: they can bear extreme environments while consistently repeating the same tasks in exactly the same way without tiring. Like robots on Earth, they can accomplish both dangerous and mundane jobs, from space walks to polishing a spacecraft’s surface. With space missions increasing in number and expanding in scientific scope, requiring more equipment, there’s a need for a lightweight robotic arm that can manipulate in environments difficult for humans.

Dec 6, 2021

Lightweight space robot with precise control developed

Posted by in categories: employment, robotics/AI, space travel

Robots are already in space. From landers on the moon to rovers on Mars and more, robots are the perfect candidates for space exploration: they can bear extreme environments while consistently repeating the same tasks in exactly the same way without tiring. Like robots on Earth, they can accomplish both dangerous and mundane jobs, from space walks to polishing a spacecraft’s surface. With space missions increasing in number and expanding in scientific scope, requiring more equipment, there’s a need for a lightweight robotic arm that can manipulate in environments difficult for humans.

However, the control schemes that can move such arms on Earth, where the planes of operation are flat, do not translate to space, where the environment is unpredictable and changeable. To address this issue, researchers in Harbin Institute of Technology’s School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation have developed a robotic arm weighing 9.23 kilograms—about the size of a one-year-old baby—capable of carrying almost a quarter of its own weight, with the ability to adjust its position and speed in real time based on its environment.

They published their results on Sept. 28 in Space: Science & Technology.

Dec 5, 2021

Electric Cars ‘Hundreds of Times’ More Efficient Than Fossil Fuel Cars

Posted by in categories: sustainability, transportation

It’s not just about emissions: new analysis has found that fossil fuel cars use more resources to make and maintain than electric cars do too.

Dec 5, 2021

New lightweight precision robotic arm developed for space applications

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, space

In a new paper published in Space: Science & Technology, a team of researchers have created a new lightweight robotic arm with precision controls.

As missions in space increase in scope and variety, so to will the tools necessary to accomplish them. Robots are already used throughout space, but robotic arms used on Earth do not translate well to space. A flat plane relative to the ground enables Earth-bound robotic arms to articulate freely in a three-dimensional coordinate grid with relatively simple programming. However, with constantly changing environments in space, a robotic arm would struggle to orient itself correctly.

Dec 5, 2021

This Senolytic Antibody Drug Could Combat Aging, and the Diseases It Brings

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

Dubbed an ‘intelligent bomb,’ this biotechnology marks an advance in senolytics, which aims to remove harmful, zombie-like cells from the body.

Dec 5, 2021

Prospects for Automation in Inland Waterway Transport

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

Ports.

Dec 5, 2021

The Fusion Driven Rocket: Nuclear Propulsion

Posted by in category: nuclear energy

😃 circa 2019.


The Fusion Driven Rocket: Nuclear Propulsion through Direct Conversion of Fusion Energy.

Dec 5, 2021

Bulletproof Chainmail: Scientists Created Flexible Fabric That Stiffens On Demand

Posted by in categories: cyborgs, materials

Engineers at California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and the Nanyang Technological University (NTU) in Singapore teamed up to develop a chain mail-inspired fabric that transforms from a fluid malleable material into a solid protective material when under pressure, a press statement reveals.

The material could be used for a host of potentially lifechanging applications, including as smart fabric for exoskeletons, for a cast that becomes more or less rigid when needed to facilitate the healing of an injury, and as a deployable bridge that could be thrown over an obstacle and stiffened so that people can walk across with ease.

Continue reading “Bulletproof Chainmail: Scientists Created Flexible Fabric That Stiffens On Demand” »

Dec 5, 2021

After AIs mastered Go and Super Mario, scientists have taught them how to ‘play’ experiments

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, robotics/AI

Inspired by the mastery of artificial intelligence (AI) over games like Go and Super Mario, scientists at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) trained an AI agent — an autonomous computational program that observes and acts — how to conduct research experiments at superhuman levels by using the same approach. The Brookhaven team published their findings in the journal Machine Learning: Science and Technology and implemented the AI agent as part of the research capabilities at NSLS-II.

As a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility located at DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory, NSLS-II enables scientific studies by more than 2000 researchers each year, offering access to the facility’s ultrabright x-rays. Scientists from all over the world come to the facility to advance their research in areas such as batteries, microelectronics, and drug development. However, time at NSLS-II’s experimental stations — called beamlines — is hard to get because nearly three times as many researchers would like to use them as any one station can handle in a day — despite the facility’s 24/7 operations.

“Since time at our facility is a precious resource, it is our responsibility to be good stewards of that; this means we need to find ways to use this resource more efficiently so that we can enable more science,” said Daniel Olds, beamline scientist at NSLS-II and corresponding author of the study. “One bottleneck is us, the humans who are measuring the samples. We come up with an initial strategy, but adjust it on the fly during the measurement to ensure everything is running smoothly. But we can’t watch the measurement all the time because we also need to eat, sleep and do more than just run the experiment.”

Dec 5, 2021

Wolfgang Pauli’s *Philosophical* Position on Quantum Mechanics and Angels

Posted by in category: quantum physics

The Swiss-American theoretical physicist Wolfgang Pauli (1900–1958) once stated (in a 1954 letter to Max Born) the following often-quoted…

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