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Jun 22, 2018

Journal Club June 2018 — Age-related changes to the nuclear membrane

Posted by in categories: futurism, life extension

For the June edition of Journal Club, we will be taking a look at the recent paper entitled “Changes at the nuclear lamina alter binding of pioneer factor Foxa2 in aged liver”.

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/acel.12742

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Jun 22, 2018

Was Thanos Right About Overpopulation!?

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

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Jun 22, 2018

Four cures for automation anxiety

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, robotics/AI

Robert E. Litan introduces four solutions to concerns about automation’s impact on wages.

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Jun 22, 2018

Accurate measurements of sodium intake confirm relationship with mortality

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food

Eating foods high in salt is known to contribute to high blood pressure, but does that linear relationship extend to increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death? Recent cohort studies have contested that relationship, but a new study published in the International Journal of Epidemiology by investigators from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and their colleagues using multiple measurements confirms it. The study suggests that an inaccurate way of estimating sodium intake may help account for the paradoxical findings of others.

“Sodium is notoriously hard to measure,” said Nancy Cook, ScD, a biostatistician in the Department of Medicine at BWH. “Sodium is hidden—you often don’t know how much of it you’re eating, which makes it hard to estimate how much a person has consumed from a dietary questionnaire. Sodium excretions are the best measure, but there are many ways of collecting those. In our work, we used multiple measures to get a more accurate picture.”

Sodium intake can be measured using a spot test to determine how much salt has been excreted in a person’s urine sample. However, in urine can fluctuate throughout the day so an accurate measure of a person’s on a given day requires a full 24-hour sample. In addition, sodium consumption may change from day to day, meaning that the best way to get a full picture of sodium intake is to take samples on multiple days.

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Jun 22, 2018

Report finds only 35% of Canadian youth get the physical activity recommended for brain health

Posted by in categories: health, neuroscience

Only 35 per cent of five- to 17-year-olds and 62 per cent of children ages 3 and 4 are getting the recommended physical-activity levels for their age group (Editor’s note: around 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity daily, including vigorous-intensity activity on at least 3 days per week) and that this may be having an impact on the health of their brains.


___ Getting kids outside and active could help with brain health: Participaction report (The Globe and Mail): The physical benefits of kids leading an active lifestyle, including better heart heal…

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Jun 22, 2018

Is There a Smarter Path to Artificial Intelligence? Some Experts Hope So

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

The danger, some experts warn, is that A.I. will run into a technical wall and eventually face a popular backlash — a familiar pattern in artificial intelligence since that term was coined in the 1950s. With deep learning in particular, researchers said, the concerns are being fueled by the technology’s limits.


A branch of A.I. called deep learning has transformed computer performance in tasks like vision and speech. But meaning, reasoning and common sense remain elusive.

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Jun 22, 2018

Apple, Samsung, BMW, and others are working on a digital car key

Posted by in categories: mobile phones, transportation

A bunch of modern cars already let you unlock your vehicle using your phone, but there isn’t a standard to ensure that the feature will work across devices for years to come. Thankfully, a number of tech firms and automakers are coming together to sort that out.

More than 70 companies, including the likes of Apple, LG, Samsung, Panasonic, Audi, GM, BMW, Hyundai, NXP, Qualcomm, and Volkswagen, have joined hands under the Car Connectivity Consortium to create the Digital Key standard, which is a specification that aims to let you securely unlock and start your vehicle across car and mobile device brands.

The publication of this standard should not only help more companies adopt these features, but also allow owners to share access to their vehicles with others, through their phones.

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Jun 21, 2018

Air Force certifies Falcon Heavy, orders satellite launch for 2020

Posted by in category: satellites

I want to thank the Air Force for certifying Falcon Heavy.

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Jun 21, 2018

New platform will help create designer human proteins in the lab

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, neuroscience

A group of researchers from Yale University and Agilent Technologies have developed a #syntheticbiology technique that turns bacterium E. Coli into a phosphorylated protein factory capable of churning out every known instance of this modification in human proteins.


Proteins, the end product of genes, carry out life functions. Most human proteins are modified by a process called serine phosphorylation — a chemical switch that can alter their structure and function. Malfunctions in this process have been implicated in diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer’s yet are difficult to detect and study. A group of researchers from Yale University and Agilent Technologies have developed a synthetic biology technique that turns bacterium E. Coli into a phosphorylated protein factory capable of churning out every known instance of this modification in human proteins.

“We synthesized over 110,000 phosphoproteins from scratch and we can now study how they all function together,” said Jesse Rinehart, associate professor of cellular and molecular physiology at the Systems Biology Institute and senior author of the research. “This is the future of scientific research — we can build everything we study.”

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Jun 21, 2018

Keystone Virus Makes Jump From Mosquitoes To Human For First Time

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

The first known human case of the virus was identified in a Florida teen after a year of tests. Known symptoms include fever and a severe rash, but it’s unclear if it causes brain inflammation.

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