Blog

Latest posts

Sep 18, 2019

How Close Are We to Downloading the Human Brain?

Posted by in categories: life extension, nuclear energy, robotics/AI

Downloading your brain may seem like science fiction, but some neuroscientists think it’s not only possible, but that we’ve already started down a path to one day make it a reality. So, how close are we to downloading a human brain?

How Close Are We to Fusion Energy? — https://youtu.be/ZW_YCWLyv6A

Continue reading “How Close Are We to Downloading the Human Brain?” »

Sep 17, 2019

Researchers discover massive neutron star that tests the limits of physics

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics

Astronomers have detected the most massive neutron star ever, and it almost shouldn’t even exist.

Neutron stars are the smallest in the universe, with a diameter comparable to the size of a city like Chicago or Atlanta. They are the leftover remnants of supernovae. But they are incredibly dense, with masses bigger than that of our sun. So think of the sun, compressed into a major city.

In the case of the newly detected neutron star, dubbed J0740+6620, it’s 333,000 times the mass of the Earth and 2.17 times the mass of the sun. But the star is only about 15 miles across. It’s 4,600 light-years from Earth.

Sep 17, 2019

Driverless cars will lead to more sex in cars, study finds

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, sex, transportation

Self-driving vehicles will lead to a rise in car sex, according to a new study.

People will be more likely to eat, sleep and engage in on-the-road hanky-panky when robot cars become the new normal, according to research published in the most recent issue of the journal Annals of Tourism Research.

“People will be sleeping in their vehicles, which has implications for roadside hotels. And people may be eating in vehicles that function as restaurant pods,” Scott Cohen, who led the study, told Fast Company magazine.

Sep 17, 2019

Russian billionaire plans to create floating ‘Noak’s Ark in SPACE’ with 15million Earthlings on board

Posted by in category: space

A RUSSIAN billionaire is bankrolling a bonkers project to build the world’s first country based entirely in space.

The nation of Asgardia plans to send millions of Earthlings up to live on giant orbiting space arks to escape the chaos as humanity “wipes itself out” in the coming decades.

The Sci-Fi community has its own flag and national anthem, and nearly 300,000 people have signed up to become citizens online.

Sep 17, 2019

Like wine in a glass

Posted by in category: cosmology

Like wine in a glass, huge clouds of hot gas are sloshing back and forth in a cluster of galaxies about 480 million light years from Earth! Sloshing motions, like those seen here in Abell 2052, redistribute elements forged in supernova explosions such as iron and oxygen!

Want to learn more? https://s.si.edu/2mkQuwt

Sep 17, 2019

SpaceX’s orbital Starship prototype construction progress detailed in new photos

Posted by in categories: Elon Musk, space travel

SpaceX is making progress assembling its Starship orbital spacecraft prototype, as seen in new photos shared by SpaceX CEO Elon Musk. This full-scale testing version of the Starship will take over for the StarHopper, which was a scaled-down version used to test the Raptor engine initially with low-altitude “hop” flights.

The Starship Mk I Prototype and Mk II prototypes, which are under construction simultaneously at SpaceX facilities in South Texas and Florida, will be used to test flights at higher altitudes and higher speeds, and will use as many as three to six Raptor engines simultaneously, versus the single engine used with the StarHopper.

spacex 2

Sep 17, 2019

Rare 10 million-year-old fossil unearths new view of human evolution

Posted by in category: evolution

Near an old mining town in Central Europe, known for its picturesque turquoise-blue quarry water, lay Rudapithecus. For 10 million years, the fossilized ape waited in Rudabánya, Hungary, to add its story to the origins of how humans evolved.

What Rudabánya yielded was a pelvis—among the most informative bones of a skeleton, but one that is rarely preserved. An international research team led by Carol Ward at the University of Missouri analyzed this new pelvis and discovered that bipedalism—or the ability for people to move on two legs—might possibly have deeper ancestral origins than previously thought.

The Rudapithecus pelvis was discovered by David Begun, a professor of anthropology at the University of Toronto who invited Ward to collaborate with him to study this fossil. Begun’s work on limb bones, jaws and teeth has shown that Rudapithecus was a relative of modern African apes and humans, a surprise given its location in Europe. But information on its posture and locomotion has been limited, so the discovery of a pelvis is important.

Sep 17, 2019

Antibacterial surface mimicking structure of cicada wings to be put to practical use

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, materials

O.o.


SUITA, Osaka — A group of researchers at Kansai University here has developed a material with significant germ-killing effects by copying the structure of cicada wings.

Sep 17, 2019

Google Fi gets a cheaper “unlimited” plan, bundled cloud storage

Posted by in category: futurism

With the cloud storage, you’ll save about $12 over the old Fi unlimited plan.

Sep 17, 2019

Space Talent puts jobs at Blue Origin, SpaceX and elsewhere in one big database

Posted by in categories: Elon Musk, employment, information science, space travel

Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin space venture and Elon Musk’s SpaceX are often at odds, but there’s at least one place where those two space-industry rivals are on the same page: the newly unveiled Space Talent job database.

The search engine for careers in the space industry is a project of Space Angels, a nationwide network designed to link angel investors with space entrepreneurs.

“If you’ve ever considered working in space, this jobs board has 3,000 reasons to make the leap,” Space Angels CEO Chad Anderson said in a tweet.

Page 1 of 3,63112345678Last