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Archive for the ‘entertainment’ category: Page 6

Sep 10, 2019

🏺That time where it rained for two million years

Posted by in category: entertainment

🏺 That time where it rained for two million years.

Fyodor R.

At the beginning of the Triassic Period, the world was hot, and very dry. But then 234 million years ago, it started to rain and didn €™t stop for two million years. This period of intense rain called the Carnian Pluvial Episode killed of many of the early reptiles and set the stage for the dinosaurs to take over the world.

Sep 9, 2019

2019 Developer Circles from Facebook Community Challenge

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, business, entertainment

Facebook’s Developer Circles are local communities designed to help developers learn and grow. For the 2019 Developer Circles Community Challenge, you are invited to build software applications that use at least one of three featured technologies: React360, Spark AR, and/or HTML5 Games. Your software must also fit into one of three categories: Gaming and Entertainment, Productivity and Utility, or Social Good.


Build software using React360, Spark AR, or HTML5 Games to give people the power to connect with friends and family, find communities and grow businesses.

Sep 8, 2019

Sensory overload: Some people genetically wired to detest bright lights, big sounds

Posted by in categories: entertainment, genetics

The average North American life – which values gregarious personalities, extroverted social styles, clamorous entertainment, bright lights and big sound – is simply too much for many sensitive people.

“This world is not built for sensitive people. In fact, our world is designed perfectly for those who are detached,” wrote Nicole Hollingshead, a Canadian empowerment blogger, in response to a Quora question about the highly sensitive person (HSP) trait. Her statement illustrates the way that most HSPs feel when comparing themselves to their seemingly unfazed non-HSP peers.

The term highly sensitive person was coined in the 1990s by husband and wife psychologist team Elaine Aron and Arthur Aron. The HSP trait is synonymous with the term sensory processing sensitivity (SPS) and is thought to be genetically determined and present at birth. SPS exists in 15–20 percent of the human population, and has been observed in over 100 nonhuman species.

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Sep 5, 2019

VFX Breakdown | Simulation

Posted by in category: entertainment

Of my Sci-Fi short film Simulation.

Sep 4, 2019

Square Enix Shows Real-Time Graphics Of The Future

Posted by in categories: entertainment, futurism

Square Enix studio Luminous Productions has unveiled a new tech demo called “Back Stage” that shows how it uses ray-tracing tech. The demo is rendered in real-time.

Luminous Productions was established last year and staffed with former Final Fantasy XV staff. The game’s director Hajime Tabata initially headed up the studio. He has since left Square Enix.

As Siliconera points out, this tech demo shows off next-gen possibilities for its in-house Luminous Engine. Here, the real-time ray tracing shows the character’s face and emotions reflected in a realistic way that simply isn’t possible in previous real-time rending tech.

Sep 3, 2019

MIT scientists say new skin patch to deliver cancer medication in 60 seconds shows promise in mice

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, entertainment

Researchers from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) developing new method to deliver #cancer medication.


An experimental patch designed to deliver cancer medications through the skin showed promise in mice and human skin samples, according to new research presented Sunday at the American Chemical Society conference in California, San Diego.

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology developed the patch to fight melanoma, a deadly but highly treatable form of skin cancer. The patch is less than a centimeter long and coated with a sticky film, which allows it to be applied and removed from the skin in a minute.

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Aug 31, 2019

Google’s Stadia game service is officially coming November: Everything you need to know

Posted by in categories: entertainment, mobile phones

Today, Google has revealed the key details that were conspicuously missing from its March announcement of the new Stadia game streaming service. Namely, what the heck we’re going to be able to play, how much we’ll pay, and when we can get started with the exciting new service — which beams high-end console and PC games to any Chrome web browser, Chromecast Ultra TV dongle or Pixel 3 smartphone from beefy new Google servers.

The short version: Google Stadia will launch in November, in 14 different territories including the US, UK and Canada, with at least 31 games from 21 different publishers, for an initial “Founder’s Edition” price of $130 for a hardware starter kit with three months of premium service, and $10 a month afterwards. There’s a separate free tier coming in 2020.

Pre-orders for the “Founder’s Edition” are now open, and I’ll explain what it is in a tad, but there’s something important you should know first.

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Aug 31, 2019

The First Human Head Transplant Was Successful? THE TRUTH || DOCTOR SERGIO CANAVERO

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical, entertainment, space travel

This is interesting because it has today type applications, but I wonder, what about a 3D printed body? Remember the movie Starship Troopers when they repaired that guy’s leg in the water tank thing? I’ve seen similar devices in other movies. Could be easier than removing the head completely and safer, when the ability to print human tissues is feasible.


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Aug 30, 2019

Investigating the best features for predicting a movie’s genre and estimated budget

Posted by in categories: computing, entertainment

A team of researchers at the University of Virginia has recently carried out a large-scale analysis aimed at identifying features in film trailers that best predict a movie’s genre and estimated budget. In their study, outlined in a paper pre-published on arXiv, the researchers specifically compared the effectiveness of visual, audio, text, and metadata-based features.

“Video understanding is the next frontier after image understanding,” Vicente Ordonez, one of the researchers who carried out the study, told TechXplore. “However, much work on understanding has so far focused on short clips with a human performing a single action. We wanted something longer, but there is also the issue of computational power. Video trailers seemed like an intermediate compromise, as they display a multitude of things, from scary to funny.”

Movie trailers are short and can easily be paired with movie descriptions. Ordonez and his colleagues realized that these characteristics make them ideal to investigate parallels between video and language.

Aug 30, 2019

Quantum engineering atomically smooth single-crystalline silver films

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, engineering, entertainment, nanotechnology, quantum physics

Ultra-low-loss metal films with high-quality single crystals are in demand as the perfect surface for nanophotonics and quantum information processing applications. Silver is by far the most preferred material due to low-loss at optical and near infrared (near-IR) frequencies. In a recent study now published on Scientific Reports, Ilya A. Rodionov and an interdisciplinary research team in Germany and Russia reported a two-step approach for electronic beam evaporation of atomically smooth single crystalline metal films. They proposed a method to establish thermodynamic control of the film growth kinetics at the atomic level in order to deposit state-of-the-art metal films.

The researchers deposited 35 to 100 nm thick, single-crystalline silver with sub-100 picometer (pm) with theoretically limited optical losses to form ultrahigh-Q nanophotonic devices. They experimentally estimated the contribution of material purity, material grain boundaries, surface roughness and crystallinity to the optical properties of metal films. The team demonstrated a fundamental two-step approach for single-crystalline growth of silver, gold and aluminum films to open new possibilities in nanophotonics, biotechnology and superconductive quantum technologies. The research team intends to adopt the method to synthesize other extremely low-loss single-crystalline metal films.

Optoelectronic devices with plasmonic effects for near-field manipulation, amplification and sub-wavelength integration can open new frontiers in nanophotonics, quantum optics and in quantum information. Yet, the ohmic losses associated in metals are a considerable challenge to develop a variety of useful plasmonic devices. Materials scientists have devoted research efforts to clarify the influence of metal film properties to develop high performance material platforms. Single-crystalline platforms and nanoscale structural alterations can prevent this problem by eliminating material-induced scattering losses. While silver is one of the best known plasmonic metals at optical and near-IR frequencies, the metal can be challenging for single-crystalline film growth.

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