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Archive for the ‘energy’ category

Oct 13, 2019

NASA engineer invents physics-breaking new space engine

Posted by in categories: energy, physics, space

Star Trek’s Montgomery Scott famously said “ye cannot change the laws of physics”, but a real-life space engineer says he might have just done that.

David Burns of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama has unveiled what he’s calling the ‘helical engine’, which could potentially power flights across space without using any fuel at all.

There’s just one small problem — it breaks the laws of physics as we know them.

Oct 13, 2019

Marine cultivation technology opening the door to the rich sources of clean energy in our oceans

Posted by in category: energy

New technology plans to tackle the future energy crisis by capturing sunlight and turning it to bioenergy.

Oct 12, 2019

Toyota unveils revamped hydrogen sedan to take on Tesla

Posted by in categories: energy, transportation

TOKYO (Reuters) — Toyota Motor Corp (7203.T) unveiled a completely redesigned hydrogen-powered fuel cell sedan on Friday in its latest attempt to revive demand for the niche technology that it hopes will become mainstream.

Japan’s biggest automaker has been developing fuel-cell vehicles for more than two decades, but the technology has been eclipsed by the rapid rise of rival battery-powered electric vehicles promoted by the likes of Tesla Inc ( TSLA.O ).

Ahead of the Tokyo Motor Show starting on Oct. 24, Toyota unveiled a prototype of the new hydrogen sedan built on the same platform as its luxury Lexus brand’s LS coupe. The new Mirai model boasts longer driving range than its predecessor and completely redesigned fuel cell stack and hydrogen tanks, the company said.

Oct 11, 2019

The Future of Sewage Is Power and Profits

Posted by in categories: energy, futurism

A new treatment plant can make energy, clean water and chemicals.

Oct 11, 2019

NASA engineer’s ‘helical engine’ may violate the laws of physics

Posted by in categories: energy, physics

“It would also need to be big – some 200 metres long and 12 metres in diameter – and powerful, requiring 165 megawatts of power to generate just 1 newton of thrust, which is about the same force you use to type on a keyboard. For that reason, the engine would only be able to reach meaningful speeds in the frictionless environment of space. “The engine itself would be able to get to 99 per cent the speed of light if you had enough time and power,” says Burns.”


A NASA engineer has published plans for an engine that could accelerate a rocket without using propellant. But there are questions over whether it could work.

Oct 9, 2019

Flight of an aeroplane with solid-state propulsion

Posted by in categories: energy, transportation

Circa 2018


Since the first aeroplane flight more than 100 years ago, aeroplanes have been propelled using moving surfaces such as propellers and turbines. Most have been powered by fossil-fuel combustion. Electroaerodynamics, in which electrical forces accelerate ions in a fluid1,2, has been proposed as an alternative method of propelling aeroplanes—without moving parts, nearly silently and without combustion emissions3,4,5,6. However, no aeroplane with such a solid-state propulsion system has yet flown. Here we demonstrate that a solid-state propulsion system can sustain powered flight, by designing and flying an electroaerodynamically propelled heavier-than-air aeroplane. We flew a fixed-wing aeroplane with a five-metre wingspan ten times and showed that it achieved steady-level flight. All batteries and power systems, including a specifically developed ultralight high-voltage (40-kilovolt) power converter, were carried on-board. We show that conventionally accepted limitations in thrust-to-power ratio and thrust density4,6,7, which were previously thought to make electroaerodynamics unfeasible as a method of aeroplane propulsion, are surmountable. We provide a proof of concept for electroaerodynamic aeroplane propulsion, opening up possibilities for aircraft and aerodynamic devices that are quieter, mechanically simpler and do not emit combustion emissions.

Oct 9, 2019

Fastest rc Turbine Model Jet in Action 727KMH 451MPH Flight Training World Record Training Part 2

Posted by in category: energy

Model: RC Speeder “Inferno” full GFK
Engine: Turbine Behotec 180
Fuel: Kerosene
Take-off weight: 7.5Kg
Max Speed: 750 Kmh / 466 Mph
http://guinnessworldrecords.com/world-records/fastest-remote…raft-(rc)/

More videos from this jet you can see my playlist:

Copyright ©: RC MEDIA WORLD

Oct 9, 2019

Forever LED Light

Posted by in category: energy

The first and only full line of energy saving LED lights with a lifetime guarantee. Never change a light bulb again! | Check out ‘Forever LED Light’ on Indiegogo.

Oct 9, 2019

Ekipazh: Russia’s top-secret nuclear-powered satellite

Posted by in categories: energy, military, satellites

There is strong evidence from publicly available sources that a Russian company called KB Arsenal is working on a new type of military satellite equipped with a nuclear power source. Called Ekipazh, its mission may well be to perform electronic warfare from space.

KB Arsenal, based in St. Petersburg, is no newcomer to the development of nuclear-powered satellites. In the Soviet days it built satellites known as US-A (standing for “active controllable satellite”), which carried nuclear reactors to power radars used for ocean reconnaissance (in the West they were known as “radar ocean reconnaissance satellites” or RORSAT for short.) The satellites had been conceived in the early 1960s at the OKB-52 design bureau of Vladimir Chelomei before work on them was transferred to KB Arsenal at the end of that decade. The satellites’ three-kilowatt thermoelectric reactors, known as BES-5 or Buk, were built by the Krasnaya Zvezda (“Red Star”) organization. The US-A satellites operated in low Earth orbits at an altitude of roughly 260 kilometers and, after finishing their mission, the reactors were boosted to storage orbits at an altitude of about 900 kilometers.

Oct 2, 2019

Li-CO2 Batteries Promise 7 Times The Energy Density Of Lithium-Iion

Posted by in categories: energy, sustainability

You may think that lithium-ion batteries are the best man can create, but researchers believe otherwise. There are other combinations of elements that are very promising. What about a cell with potential for seven times more energy density than Li-Ion could ever achieve? State of the art for current batteries would be 256 Wh/kg. Lithium-Carbon Dioxide batteries – or Li-CO2, for short – can theoretically reach 1,876 Wh/kg. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago created the first usable Li-CO2 battery. It was tested to up to 500 cycles, and it worked, which is great news.


Researchers at the University of Illinois in Chicago created the first usable Li-CO2 battery. It has 7 times the energy density of a Li-Ion battery.

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