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Archive for the ‘chemistry’ category: Page 5

Apr 25, 2022

Scientists demonstrate the use of a hydrogen molecule as a quantum sensor

Posted by in categories: chemistry, quantum physics

What if we could use a hydrogen molecule as a quantum sensor in a terahertz laser-equipped scanning tunneling microscope? This would allow us to measure the chemical properties of materials at unprecedented time and spatial resolutions.

This new technique has now been developed by physicists at the University of California, Irvine, according to a statement released by the institution on Friday.

“This project represents an advance in both the measurement technique and the scientific question the approach allowed us to explore,” said in the press release co-author of the new study Wilson Ho, Donald Bren Professor of physics & astronomy and chemistry.

Apr 25, 2022

Spot robot dog can smell airborne gas or chemical hazards in real-time

Posted by in categories: chemistry, robotics/AI

Teledyne FLIR Defense has announced the partnership with MFE Inspection Solutions to integrate the FLIR MUVE C360 multi-gas detector on Boston Dynamics’ Spot robot and commercial unmanned aerial systems (UAS). The integrated solutions will enable remote monitoring of chemical threats in industrial and public safety applications.

The compact multi-gas detector can detect and classify airborne gas or chemical hazards, allowing inspection personnel to perform their job more safely and efficiently with integrated remote sensing capabilities from both the air and ground.

MUVE C360 is designed to operate on Boston Dynamics‘Spot mobile robot, which can autonomously inspect dangerous, inaccessible, or remote environments. It is also compatible with common commercial UAS systems, which allow operators to fly the C360 into a scene to perform hazard assessments in real-time.

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Apr 24, 2022

Reconfigurable halide perovskite nanocrystal memristors for neuromorphic computing

Posted by in categories: chemistry, computing

Existing memristive devices cannot be reconfigured to meet the diverse volatile and non-volatile switching requirements, and hence rely on tailored material designs specific to the targeted application, limiting their universality. “Reconfigurable memristors” that combine both ionic diffusive and drift mechanisms could address these limitations, but they remain elusive. Here we present a reconfigurable halide perovskite nanocrystal memristor that achieves on-demand switching between diffusive/volatile and drift/non-volatile modes by controllable electrochemical reactions. Judicious selection of the perovskite nanocrystals and organic capping ligands enable state-of-the-art endurance performances in both modes – volatile (2 × 106 cycles) and non-volatile (5.6 × 103 cycles). We demonstrate the relevance of such proof-of-concept perovskite devices on a benchmark reservoir network with volatile recurrent and non-volatile readout layers based on 19,900 measurements across 25 dynamically-configured devices.

Apr 24, 2022

Scientists Find an Enzyme That May Stop Brain Activity Getting Out of Control

Posted by in categories: chemistry, neuroscience

Our brains are awash with various unsung chemical heroes, making sure the electrical signals traveling all over the place don’t get out of control.

A new mouse study has now detailed the function of a pair of proteins vital to maintaining this balance – this could help us better understand a range of neurological disorders from epilepsy to schizophrenia.

The two proteins – Rab3-interacting molecule 1 (RIM1) and an enzyme called serine arginine protein kinase 2 (SRPK2) – work together to modify the transmission of information across the gaps between nerves called synapses.

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Apr 23, 2022

Morgan Levine is interviewed by Rhonda Patrick on Longevity. My picks on it

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, life extension

This is a 10-minute version with my picks on an hour-and-a-half interview on the longevity science made by Rhonda Patrick to Morgan Levine.

The link to the entire interview, which took place on April 12, 2022, is in the description of the video.

Continue reading “Morgan Levine is interviewed by Rhonda Patrick on Longevity. My picks on it” »

Apr 23, 2022

Future Of Aging & Cellular Reprogramming | Eleanor Sheekey Ep 4

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, life extension, media & arts

She gives a great analogy of slowing aging versus reversing aging, and I did not realize Yamanaka Factors were not so perfect in current use.


In this video Eleanor talks about the her view on Longevity Escape Velocity and reprogramming with Yamanaka factors and some of the issues around this technology.

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Apr 22, 2022

Titan’s largest crater might be the perfect cradle for life

Posted by in categories: chemistry, quantum physics, space

Impacts on Saturn’s mysterious moon may have mixed water and organic molecules in a warm environment.


Physicists at the University of California, Irvine have demonstrated the use of a hydrogen molecule as a quantum sensor in a terahertz laser-equipped scanning tunneling microscope, a technique that can measure the chemical properties of materials at unprecedented time and spatial resolutions.

Apr 22, 2022

Scientists turn a hydrogen molecule into a quantum sensor

Posted by in categories: chemistry, computing, particle physics, quantum physics

Physicists at the University of California, Irvine have demonstrated the use of a hydrogen molecule as a quantum sensor in a terahertz laser-equipped scanning tunneling microscope, a technique that can measure the chemical properties of materials at unprecedented time and spatial resolutions.

This new technique can also be applied to analysis of two-dimensional materials which have the potential to play a role in advanced energy systems, electronics and quantum computers.

Today in Science, the researchers in UCI’s Department of Physics & Astronomy and Department of Chemistry describe how they positioned two bound atoms of hydrogen in between the silver tip of the STM and a sample composed of a flat copper surface arrayed with small islands of copper nitride. With pulses of the laser lasting trillionths of a second, the scientists were able to excite the hydrogen molecule and detect changes in its quantum states at and in the ultrahigh vacuum environment of the instrument, rendering atomic-scale, time-lapsed images of the sample.

Apr 22, 2022

Synthetic DNA Manufacturer has the “Write Stuff”

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, economics, genetics

Circa 2021 Synthetic silicon dna storage.


In research, the demand for DNA strands often outpaces supply. To help supply keep up, researchers may set aside traditional molecular cloning techniques and embrace polymerase chain reaction select PCR)-based techniques. Alternatively, researchers may perform gene synthesis, or the de novo chemical synthesis of DNA. Besides accelerating the creation of genetic sequences, gene synthesis avoids the need for template strands and simplifies procedures such as codon optimization and the fabrication of mutant sequences.

Although gene synthesis can be performed in house, many laboratories prefer to focus on their core competencies and outsource their gene synthesis projects to service providers, especially if sequences of over 1,000 base pairs are desired. Outsourcing also allows laboratories to take advantage of service providers’ economies of scale and quick turnaround times. Finally, service providers offer ease of use. Clients can go online, upload the desired sequences, choose the vector, get the price, and place the order. The entire process takes only a few minutes, and the genes can be delivered a few days later.

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Apr 21, 2022

A biological motor that consumes chiral fuel drives rotation in one direction around a single covalent bond

Posted by in categories: biological, chemistry, internet, nanotechnology, particle physics

Bart Blommaertsif it helps. But don’t cut internet cables with that thing!!

Andreas StürmerFinally. Is it going to be a rail or car tunnel?

Eric KlienAdmin.

Continue reading “A biological motor that consumes chiral fuel drives rotation in one direction around a single covalent bond” »

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